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Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II
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 Posted: Thu Nov 9th, 2017 08:20 am
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Keith Pashina
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A Little More Gilpin Mill




This enlargement of a Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image shows parts of the south and west sides if the mill. The C&S Black depot is at the front right edge of the photo




This enlargement of another Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image shows the shop building on the north side of the Gilpin Mill. I do not know if this was part of the mill, or the adjacent MacFarlane Foundry on the other side (north side) if it. Several interesting things of note here. One is the general compactness of the scene - buildings and roads are closely spaced together. There is a horse tied up to a railing in front of the building. A little more detail shows up on the wagon unloading ore doors on the stone mill building, at left. The two-story building has an odd shape to it, with additions on the south side, an open stairway. A lot of detail to study here and potentially model



Here is that C&S track map of Black Hawk again, to show where the Gilpin Mill and MacFarlane Foundry were located. The building we previously observed is not shown in this map. Note the C&S depot trackage and the Black Hawk yard tracks



The C&S depot was constructed of stone, which was a readily available material. The track closest to the camera would eventually be laid with the third rail for the Gilpin Tram, once the tramway finished battling Mayor Fick for rights to build down through town


Keith

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 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2017 08:34 am
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elminero67
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The masonry on the C&S depot is similar to the rockwork on the Polar Star and a few other mills in the area. Really a distinct style



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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 08:22 am
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Keith Pashina
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Black Hawk Depot Area



Black Hawk depot, looking north


The second Black Hawk depot was a single story station built from local rubble stone that was mortared together.  This 38' by 80' station was built in 1878, and replaced an early station built in 1872, which was found to be unsatisfactory. The new station ended up being closer to the main retail and business districts of Black Hawk, and the "yard" was built around the station, also. I won't go into more detail here - Harry Brunk wrote about his station and published drawings of it in the July/August 1980 Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette, so I'll steer you there for more information. 

The Gilpin Tram ran past this station, on dual-gauge track shared with the Colorado & Southern 3' gauge. From what I can tell, there were no spurs here diverging off the three rail - the trackage here was used by the Gilpin Tram to access the mills located further south down Clear Creek Canyon.

Some Gilpin Tram references refer to the "depot". The Tram did not have a separate structure, and may have utilized part of the Black Hawk station, but how and when I have no good information. It seems that when large excursions came into town, the C&S transported them further up the canyon to the Gilpin Tram - C&S Railway transfer was located - here, the two different gauge tracks were side by side. There is photographic information showing the 1908 Democratic National Convention excursion loaded in the Black Hawk freight transfer area, and not at the stone depot.



This C&S trackage map shows the 1920s vintage trackage around the C&S depot (shaded in blue). There were several tracks here. In earlier days, there was a turntable located behind the depot, but this was later relocated further south. There was quite a bit of industry track and yard tracks that needed to be switched



I am not all that knowledgable about the Colorado Central and C&S in Black Hawk. However, one website that has a lot of excellent information on the 3' gauge is Darel Leedy's C&Sn3 blog. The Discussion Forum section of the website has page after page of prototype and modeling information. I will defer to the authors of those pages for the authoritative discussion of what happened here on the 3' gauge

Beginning wth the 28th post of Modeling the Gilpin Tram Part II, we began looking at the ore processing mills north of the Gilpin Tram's Black Hawk engine house and yards, and started working our way south. The map shown below is worth taking a look and a get a perspective of what we have looked at so far and what is still to come.

Of the 17 mills and ore handling facilities shown on the map below, we have so far looked at 12 of these mills and facilities, so there is a lot more to look at. 








This photo is an enlargement of a Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image of Black Hawk. This shows the cross buck for the dual gauge trackage at Gregory Street. Note the dual gauge track at the bottom of the photo. The ballast obscures the crossties. The railroad crossing sign (cross buck) is unusual. Usually, we see black lettering on a white post, but this crossbuck instead has white letters on a black (or maybe dark red or some other color?) background. This would be fun to model, being different from what we usually see. Also, the white on dark background would be easy to print on a laser or inkjet printer. So, my Black Hawk model should probably have one of these, too

Next, we will look at the State Ore Sampler as we stumble, er, travel further down Clear Creek Canyon.

Keith







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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 07:37 pm
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CBryars2
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Some great detail on Black Hawk. Very interested in your next post on Stse Ore Sampler, only pictures I have on that one were from your presentation in KC hoping you have some more "gold" to share with us.

Do you have anymore imagesof Fifty gold Mine\Bobtail Mill showing section looking from Polar Star towards Black Hawk? That area seems to have some serious detail to model.

Thanks for all your postings!!!



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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 06:41 am
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Keith Pashina
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Cameron,
You're right about the Bobtail/Fifty Gold Mines Mill - there is a lot of interesting information there that could be modeled or used for inspiration for freelanced models.  So before looking at the State Ore Sampler, let's take another look at the 


Bobtail/Fifty Gold Mines Redux



This is an enlargement of Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2049. It's a view looking southward along Clear Creek. It's blurry because it is enlarged from the original image. This shows the complex in later years, I think when rebuilt as the Fifty Gold Mines Mill - the typical mill structure shape can be seen here



Contrast this image with the previous one. This image was taken earlier than the previous one, and may be showing what was then the Bobtail Mill. Dating these gets hard because the archive often gives a range of years the photo may have been taken. The sloping mill structure is not built yet - instead, there is a squat stone mill structure. This is from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2022



Enlarging the previous image, the building in the front was the former Rocky Mountain Machine Works, which apparently was acquired by the Bobtail Mill and repurposed as a shop building. Note the lengthy sheds parallel to the C&S  spur. They kind of look like coal sheds, but may have been used for ore deliveries, too

Chris of Tonopah Mine fame and a reader of the blog, sent some interesting observations and raised some questions. He noted that the C&S map I had previously referred to shows the Bobtail Mill, and not the Fifty Gold Mines Mill, so it's more likely dating from UP,D,&G days. I went back to check the map, and it’s titled “Colorado and Southern Railway Station Grounds at Black Hawk”, and dated “May A.D. 1898”.  Chris notes that the Fifty Gold Mines Mill was built in 1898 and didn't have a structure at the end of the siding as shown on the map I had posted. 
 
Chris wondered if the Gilpin Tram also served the Bobtail/Fifty Gold Mines Mill?  He noted that there were ore bins on the upper siding and also an incline for 2’ gauge mine track up to the electric tram from the Bobtail adit, so ore was delivered by the C&S.  
 
I wondered about that, too, and about 20 years ago, when I first got a copy of the C&S Black Hawk map from the Colorado Historical Society, I thought I may have had some evidence that the Tram served this mill. The original map was drawn on linen, and the draftsmens’ erasures could be clearly seen, on both the original and the copy I had. You could see where the draftsmen had erased the Gilpin Tram trackage, leaving faint marks on the drawing. I think this drawing was periodically updated over the years. Anyway, when I saw similar erasure marks at the Bobtail Mill, I assumed the Gilpin Tram may have served it. Now, I think the erasure marks were an update of the C&S trackage at the mill, and not showing any three-rail track.
 
Chris also noted that the Gilpin Tram had a three-rail trackage draw at the Eagle Mill and wondered if anyone had made offered any further comments on the location of the draw, particularly since there was another three-rail trackage draw between the Bobtail/Fiftysiding switch and the road crossing of Selak St? My opinion is the  draw by the Eagle Mill was to get the two foot gauge “middle rail” changed from the west to east side, to clear the turnout to the Central City Branch, then, another draw was used after passing this turnout, to get the Tram two foot center rail back to the west side, for the turnout that would lead to the Rocky Mountain Concentrator. This is my speculation only, and if anyone else has thoughts on this, please chime in.
 
Chris, thanks for your comments. If you have any further information about the Bobtail/Fifty Cold Mines Mill, please post it!





Here's a view from an enlargement of Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2032. The stone walled Bobtail Mill (building with the large stack) can be better seen here




The Bobtail Mill handled ore in several interesting ways. The tunnel opening was up Gregory Street, several hundred feet west of the mill. The electrified mine tram exited the mine tunnel opening (as shown here), crossed Gregory Street at grade, then ducked into another tunnel to pass through the hillside to exit again at the mill. This image is from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image L-200






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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 06:49 am
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Keith Pashina
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The Bobtail Mine used these uncommon (at least to me) two-trucked mine ore cars. The two halves latched together in the middle, and could be split apart for unloading. Wow, what an interesting model these would make



So, after the Bobtail Mine tram crossed Gregory Street and ducked back into the hill, it re-emerged on this wooden trestle to enter the top of the mill. This is from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2064




In this image, the trestle entering the top of the mill can be seen, along with some ore cars and the supports for the overhead electric wire. Is the Bobtail or Fifty Gold Mines Mill? Based on what Chris (Tonopah Mine) wrote me, this could now be the rebuilt mill from 1989 now known as the Fifty Gold Mines Mill. Whatever this mill is in this photo, the image is from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-61785



To helo reacquaint ourselves with where we are, I'll repost this C&S 1989 track map showing what I think would be the Bobtail Mill version of this site




And here is a different version of the mill site, from the 1900 Sanborn Map, so I think this would be what I have been calling the Fifty Gold Mines Mill, rebuilt on the same site as the Bobtail Mill and much large in size






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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 07:04 am
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Keith Pashina
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The rebuilt mill that became the Fifty Gold Mines Mill was much larger in capacity than the earlier Bobtail Mill. This shows the boiler plant for the mill, taken in 1942 long after the mill had been shut down. This image is from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-60651






A unique feature of this mill was the multiple mine tunnels and shafts served by the imill complex. This is "about the middle" of the Fifty Gold Mines complex. This image is from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-61709. That inclined structure is an incline descending down into mine tunnels below, where 2' gauge ore cars were hauled up the incline for unloading





From Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2008, we see the south end of the Bobtail  Mill. Once again, this image emphasizes how crowded Black Hawk was. Gregory Street is at the left, and the street on the right is Selak Street. The UPD&G track is not yet third-rail, so that would date this photo to prior to 1898, and probably before 1888 (when the tram was fighting to get the City's permission). The store at front left is the "Colorado Shoe" building, which was modeled by and drawings drawn up for by Harry Brunk in the Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette



Enlarging that same photo, we see this, the south end of the mill. This is another enlargement of parts of the same photo shown previously. There is lots to see here - the CC/UPD&G track is crossing right to left over the bridge over Gregory Street. Is that a 3' gauge spur going out over what looks like the roof of the flat-roofed building? Just to the right of the lattice bridge over Gregory Street, there is a short span bridge over a covered-over structure. That structure is yet another Bobtail Mine shaft entrance into the mill




That same photo reveals more details. The top arrow points to the well-known 3' bridge over Gregory Street. The 2nd arrow from top  points out what appears to be a 3' gauge spur. Was this actually a spur? Was it built into the building, or is there a concealed trestle behind it? (if anyone knows, please post here!)  Also, that building that seems to be under the 3' gauge spur seems odd. Is it an older store building reused for the mining operation? The 3rd arrow from top points to what looks like an abandoned stairway. The building appears to either be under construction, or being modified. Last, the bottom arrow points to mine trackage that seems to have exited from the sloped and covered mine tunnel/shaft, run through the flat-topped building, then curves and enters the mill

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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 07:11 am
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Keith Pashina
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The lower part of that same photo shows the 3' gauge CC/UPD&G tracks (it is not three-rail yet). The older Bobtail Mill building has an unusual doorway near the roof, where an empty mine car exits out onto a very short trestle The building in front, next to the tracks, is a great example of the "wrinkly" look buildings covered with tarpaper show. If this was flat tine siding, it would look flatter. The wagon at far left is being loaded or unloaded on Selak Street. Note the wooden sidewalk next to the street. The boards run parallel to the street - not perpendicular as most sidewalks seem to in Black Hawk



This further enlargement of the same photo shows that short little trestle with ore car on it, and what appears to be a well-weathered metal or asphalt roof on the mill building



Here is yet another enlargement of that same photo, showing more details of that two-truck, ore car, similar to what we saw exiting the Bobtail Tunnel 













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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 07:28 am
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Keith Pashina
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The last few photos were enlargements of Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2008. At the bottom of Selak Street, we see this little scene. The right hand margin is the wagon road bridge across Clear Creek. The creek itself has been lined with wood timbered and stone retaining walls to reduce flooding and obtain more space. There are two outhouses sitting on a trestle over the creek - no need to ever clean out the outhouse pit! On the CC/UPD&G track, note the little depression between two crosswise, shoveled out to make a small water drainage path across the track. All of these little details, if I can find room to model them, would really bring a model of Black Hawk to life


A Little More Black Hawk Town



We saw the front of the building before, but here is an enlargement of Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2008, showing the track side of the Colorado Shoe retail building. The "Smoke Little Joker Tobacco" sign painted on the wall is awesome - that would make a great model. The remainder of this wall has its share of posters and signs, too. Also, note that there are at least 3 glass window panes broken. From the time frame of this photo, I assume this building was occupied and in use. So, I think I should model some broken windows in my Black Hawk scene, too!




This building fronted Gregory Street, and we're looking at the rear, across Selak Street. This is from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2060. What is interesting to me are the two small trusses supporting the roof - modeling this would add a lot of interest to a model





Here's a view of the west side of the C&S bridge across Gregory Street, from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2032. This view is not commonly photographed, and is an interesting view





This image from Denver Public Library, Western History Collection image X-2008 shows the intersection of Gregory and Main Streets. In the center of the intersection is this little structure, which looks like a wagon scale. The flat wooden platform would cover the weighing mechanism, and the balance and weights for measure would be housed in the little wooden structure. The tall pole is used as a flagpole. The sidewalk is built of the more-common boards perpendicular to the street. There is a drainage ditch in front of the sidewalk


So, yes, there is a LOT of interesting detail to model in Black Hawk. And, there is much more to come in future posts.


Keith

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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 08:29 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Really great photos Keith--and pointing out the little details is very useful.
Keep up the super work. Even though I don't model Colorado, all those little
details, and the buildings, are useful in almost any area, and time frame


Herb



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