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Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II
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 Posted: Sat Nov 4th, 2017 06:27 pm
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Keith Pashina
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The Gilpin Hotel kind of, sort of survives today. Following the 1991 casino boom in Black Hawk, most of the building was demolished, but the front wall and maybe "a bit more" were saved, cleaned, and resulted in the red brick shown here. The buildings at the left are part of modern casino construction interconnected with the Gilpin Hotel shell. Sigh, progress, I guess

Keith




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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 01:12 am
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Alwin
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Great photo's of the old town Keith. Much appreciated.

At the end of post 189 you showed an old end new photo of two buildings. But I doubt that the left building is original. First the roof comes above the front wall.
But also it looks like the whole building is raised. Compare the height difference between the two buildings in the old and new situation.
Maybe parts of the front wall are re-used in the new build. L:

Alwin

Last edited on Sun Nov 5th, 2017 01:12 am by Alwin

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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 06:39 am
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Keith Pashina
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Alain,
You are correct - the building on the left in the contemporary photo has been raised relative to the brick building on the right. The older photo shows the two-story wooden building about 1' or more lower than it is today. I assumed it was the same building, but I was looking at the front facade - the windows, siding, and trim, and overlooked the overall building height. Also, the building roof today is higher than it was in older days - the roof peak sticks up above the front wall cornice - it wasn't that way 100 years ago.

Thanks for pointing this out. I wonder if the building was remodeled into apartments or something, or if the foundation was modified to raise the building - this was in this condition when Harry Brunk wrote his article in 1981, so it's not a new change that came in with the casino gambling.

A mystery as to what happened with this building between 100 years ago and today!

Keith

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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 06:57 am
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Keith Pashina
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The Other Side of Main Street




We looked previously at part of Gregory Street and the west side of Main Street. This post will look at the east side, which was closer to the railroad and creek. The white arrow points to the Boiler Works Building




This is an enlargement of the 1910 photo showing the C&S track laid up Main Street to clean up mud and debris. This is George Stroehle's Black Hawk Boiler and Sheet Iron Works building. This building replaced an earlier structure, and was built after 1899. This building is a nice combination of native stone walls, wood on upper walls, and corrugated metal siding. Harry Brunk wrote an article on this facility in the January/February 1981 Gazette, including drawings and photos of his model. This building has offered as a kit in the past in HO and O, and maybe other scales



This wooden structure was the previous Boiler Works building, and was a lot simpler  structure than the succeeding one. It looks to be clad with flat tin siding and a metal roof. What makes this structure so interesting are all the boilers laying around the industry yard. This would make a great model for my layout - I wonder if I have room for it?

Note some of the neat details in this scene - Two small outbuildings add a lot of character, but also there are power or phone line poles, neat skylights on the roof (a common detail in pre-electric era), at least two empty wagons, and all kinds of other "junk."




It's a good time to repost this map, showing where some of the buildings are that I have been talking about



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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 07:13 am
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Keith Pashina
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By the time I started exploring Black Hawk in 1986, the Boiler Works building was long gone. The boiler works operated for many years, into the 1950s. In later years it apparently was used by the local highway department. I was told, but couldn't find this in writing, that the building eventually burned down. By the 1980s, all that remained were some stone wall remnants

However, what does remain is the adjacent "Bull Durham" building




This building was originally built as Fick's Carriage Shop, and they manufactured ore wagons and carriages, and blacksmith work. The business later evolved into auto repair, and this ceased by the early 1920s, according to Hollenback's "Central City and Black Hawk Then and Now", published in 1961 by Sage Books. After the auto trade, the building was used for storage by various parties

It's most endearing feature may be the painted advertising on the front. I don't know when this was applied to the building, but here's proof it was there in the 1950s. Harry Brunk had an article and drawings of this building in the March/April Gazette

Fick's Carriage Work was owned by the same Mayor Fick who battled the Gilpin Tram when it attempted to construct it's line down Clear Creek to the lower Black Hawk Mills. Since Mayor Fick was in business to supply ore wagons to teamsters, he was not too thrilled with the railroad competition that threatened his livelihood




The front of Fick's Carriage Works is a nice brick structure with typical details such as arched windows, elaborate cornice and wooden sidewalk out front. The rear and side walls are stone construction




This is the backside of Fick's Carriage Works (2-story stone building at upper right)

Also note the little wood building at center. Obviously a lumber yard, it is as a simple of an operation as it could possibly be - the lumber is stored outside in simple racks




This photo was taken in the 1980s by Bob Axsum. A lot has changed, but Fick's Carriage Works is still there. The boiler works plant is long-gone, but the little lumber yard office is still standing





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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 07:28 am
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Keith Pashina
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This image is from the Colorado Historical Society, their image X4691. Lots of details to be seen here - the railroad yard area, downtown Black Hawk, the Gilpin Mill, and the lumber yard, Carriage Works, and Boiler Works near the center. The Gilpin Hotel is prominent at left center. Note the boxcar at lower left...




Enlarging the same photo above, we see a Union Pacific, Denver and Gulf boxcar on a short spur. From the shape, I assume this is a coal shed. That figure standing by the boxcar looks almost exactly like one of the painted HO figures that I have!



From further enlargement of the same image, more details pop up about this industry south of the lumber yard, Carriage Works, and Boiler Works. This industry was doing well enough to have its own 3' gauge spur, and there is a boxcar spotted at the siding (you can see it just above the shed roof at lower left). There is a  sizable  wood yard - I don't know if this is mine props or something else. There are some lengthy poles stored on the ground just south of the lumber yard, too. That shed next to the mine props is rather rustic looking, and the walls have several paper posters plastered to them




Jumping back a bit, look at this small wood shed at the rear of the Ficks' Carriage Works building. This is something I should model - it's a simple shed, but it has its own lean-to, and 3 or more smaller sheds next to it. Even this building appears to have paper advertisements tacked to the sidewall. There's a crude fence separating it from the railroad tracks, and a C&S switch stand can be seen near lower left. I wonder what all the protruding things are on the peaked roof wall of this shed?



The same area today is mostly unrecognizable. We'r looking south along Main Street - the parking lot is the former boiler works side, and this is the modernized north wall of Fick's Carriage Works

There still is a lot more for me to investigate, as I continue planning and scheming for my model of Black Hawk.

Until then,

Keith

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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 08:09 am
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Ken C
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Kieth
Re the before and today photo of the Cafe & Saloon, it appears that the roof had a change in pitch, when the two
metal stove stacks were redone with brick stack,s, in a different locations. Note also the wood sidewalk in front of the Saloon has been lowered from it's original height, which was level with Saloon foundation. Now needs two step's to enter Saloon.

I will admit something did not look right, took a while to figure out, overlooked the sidewalk height.

Ken C
GWN



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Kootenay Railway & Navigation Co.
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 Posted: Sun Nov 5th, 2017 04:25 pm
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Steven B
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Keith, great photos of town.  
Flooding was always a problem for these towns.  I remember a trip in the early 1980s the Fire Dept was out hosing gravels from a rain down the street in Central.  Your photo of the tracks on Main reminded me of that.  I thought, wow, just like the photos of days gone by.

I also liked the photo of the brick building with the iron shutters.  Must be an early photo. Iron shutters, used primarily for fire protection, were common in western buildings in the 1850s/60s.  I was wondering if they had been used in the Gregory.  I didn't remember seeing them in my multiple visits and they are absent in modern photos, but BAM there  hey are.  

I suspect that the "clocked" building was a jeweler/watch repair business.  Love the detail!  I am going to have to find a small clock for a jeweler and create a similar thing.  

Thanks!  



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 Posted: Thu Nov 9th, 2017 07:39 am
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Keith Pashina
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Steven,
That's a great concept - modeling a jeweler's shop with a clock sign out front. Something more to consider to possibly include in my Black Hawk town scene



Black Hawk, Again!



This colorized post card may or may not be accurate, but it could be. One would hope the photographers coloring this photo would have tried to depict the actual colors of the buildings. If correct, this shows some interesting things - the green mill building at right, the black roof on the boiler works building, and some hints of green plant growth on the treeless hillsides



This image came from the Colorado Historical Society shows an interesting blacksmith building, and is their image X4695. The image notes say it was taken between 1870 and 1890 - railroad tracks can be seen behind the building. I do not where in Black Hawk this building was located - I wonder if it disappeared fairly early?



Speaking of changes, Black Hawk has had its share of changes, even before the casino boom accelerated development. This image is looking north, up Clear Creek. Many interesting buildings can be seen here - some we looked at previously, and some we will examine more closely in future posts



Compare this contemporary photo to the previous one - I would say a lot has changed. The most glaring example is the 40-story hotel tower at right, but much of the original town is gone, too. Progress strikes again!







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 Posted: Thu Nov 9th, 2017 07:58 am
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Keith Pashina
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The Gilpin Mill




The Gilpin Mill was more or less located at the end of Gregory Street, across the tracks, and just north of the C&S depot. This mill seems to have been modified several times over the years. The wood-framed peak building was built next to and on top of a stone building that was built much earlier. Note the painted crest and signage on the peaked roof - a neat detail to model




The 1900 Sunburn Fire Insurance Map shows this layout for the Gilpin Mill - it does appear similar to the previous photo. I assume the two small buildings next to the tracks were for coal. This mill did not receive shipments via rail - it was wagon served only. The Sunburn map shows 50 stamps in the mill. Also, the mill was noted as being "iron clad" - which would have likely been painted flat tin siding



This image looks a bit different than the 1900 Sunburn map - the older stone mill building clearly shows, along with the unloading doors on the wall, where wagons hand-shoveled their ores into the mill. The wooden peaked roof building at left apparently must be a barn



In this photo, the building at the south (left side of mill), has changed again - the barn seems to have been torn down, and replaced this structure. Some sources note this as an ore sampler. I have not been able to find out much about this sampler, but being next to the C&S tracks, it could have shipped ores out by rail



This image now shows a painted sign on the end of the sampler, and perhaps an active shipping spur next to it. The sign seems to say " ?????? Smelting and Refining Co." Anyone care to hypothesize what the full name painted on this building was?
















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