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Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II
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 Posted: Wed Nov 1st, 2017 08:02 am
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Keith Pashina
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On the uphill (west side of the previous three buildings we looked at, was the Black Hawk Bakery. This interesting wooden structure has a lot of details that would make it fun to model. This photo is also an enlargement of a photo from the Western History Collection, Denver Public Library. The same archive has an earlier photo showing this business to be the "Black Hawk Cracker Works" and a delivery wagon parked in front, custom-painted to advertise the bakery. This building has large signs painted on the front - these would make a great model. The small second story porch is a nice detail



Selak Street was parallel to Gregory Street, just behind or north of the stores we previously looked at. This building was located on this street, near the rear of the Bakery. This structure was originally the Black Hawk City Hall, built in 1877. The lower floor housed the fire department. This nice brick building has published drawings by Joe Crea in his Structures of the Early West book. If you don't have a copy of this book, what's wrong with you?;) Seriously, this is a great book of building drawings that I think is out of print, but can still be found from resellers. Note the shadow on the street, and the bridge above, of the C&S 3' branch crossing Selak Street - this is the Central City branch



The former Black Hawk City Hall stands today. This is a small structure - the doors on this building are smaller than doorways of today. The star washers strengthening the floors, arched windows and doors, and cornice would make a model of this building well worth my time to build. Let's see if I have room for it




Just to keep things in perspective, let's take a view of the end of Gregory Street. This image is from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection. Note the dual gauge track (to the right of the smokestack at the front of this image. This photo emphasizes how the stores were just across a narrow street from the Bobtail Ore Mill. This crowdedness would look great in a narrow gauge town scene

Next, we'll look at some of the buildings along Main Street and alongside the tracks.  
Until then,
Keith







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 Posted: Thu Nov 2nd, 2017 05:06 am
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Monte
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Keith, a great collection of town photos. You have a interesting point about modeling a section of the town and mills. Have given this a thought before. Now with the photos will or could make this possible.



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 Posted: Thu Nov 2nd, 2017 05:39 pm
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Herb Kephart
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That Bakery is a great building, for any  time frame that will "support" a false front. Doesn't need to be a bakery, could be any sort of a retail store, although much of its charm is in the lettering as it is.

Keep going Keith!

Herb



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 Posted: Thu Nov 2nd, 2017 06:46 pm
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elminero67
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Drooling over the architecture...



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 Posted: Thu Nov 2nd, 2017 08:33 pm
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CBryars2
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Just got caught up with posts - great work. Keith was great to see you in Denver. Got to spend time with Rev and his lovely wife.



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 Posted: Fri Nov 3rd, 2017 12:01 am
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Keith Pashina
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Cameron,
It was good to see you again at the NNGC in Denver in September. I had a great time, and came back from the trip re-enthused about modeling and research. Hopefully you'll be coming to the Narrow Gauge Convention in 2018, which is in Minneapolis, which coincidentally is where I live!


More on the Black Hawk Bakery




The Black Hawk Bakery is a classic western town building. I think you could model it easily by modifying one of the several building kits offered in several scales. I'll find out, as I intend to model this on my HOn30 layout, and probably will do it by kit bashing one of the Wild West Scale Model Builders kits. 


Here is another photo of the Bakery, and this was taken between 1869 and 1879, so it predates the previous Bakery photo that I posted. This image is also from the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection, and is image X-18666 if you want to study the original.


The Bakery has a different painted front from that in the previous photo. The lettering is two color, with white or other light color shadowing. That second floor railing used in many buildings always has puzzled me - it is purely decorative, because if you walked into it, it's about knee-high, and likely to trip you and flip you over the side!  It definitely would not meet today's building codes.

Also, this image shows the neat little wagon I previously told you about. It seems to be painted up similar to the front of the building. I have a kit of this wagon - it was designed by Jerry Wilson, and laser cut by GME (Grizzly Mountain Engineering). They make other must-scale wagon kits, but if you go to their site, it is not listed. I think you'd need to contact the GME owner and make a special request to cut you a kit from their CAD files


Well, next I'll post photos of the businesses along Main Street. 

 With this image, I note that this is the 1,279th image I have posted to FreeRails over the years. 95% were posted on this thread, with the rest posted here and there. FreeRails is a wonderful resource for we modelers - a great place to share information, digitally meet other modelers, and get some inspiration. 


I have noticed on certain other forums several threads where the photos disappear due to the photo-hosting changes made recently. Yet another reason to appreciate FreeRails and to thank the hosts of this site!
Until then,
Keith





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 Posted: Fri Nov 3rd, 2017 09:15 pm
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Si.
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" I note that this is the 1,279th image I have posted to FreeRails over the years "



Hi Keith :wave:



I see you've nearly reached your 1,500 image limit then. L:


It's $399 Dollars a year after that. :bg:



:P



Si.



Just kiddin' yer ! ;)



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 Posted: Fri Nov 3rd, 2017 10:32 pm
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Keith Pashina
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Si,

Only $399 per year? It must be that new FreeRailsBucket service that's being offered!

I won't say what the contents of the bucket is, though.[whack]

Keith

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 Posted: Sat Nov 4th, 2017 07:54 am
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Keith Pashina
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Main Street in Black Hawk



Main Street in Black Hawk ran parallel to Clear Creek and the railroad, and intersected Gregory Street at the north end. In 1910, a flood washed large amounts of mud and debris down Gregory Gulch and left a mess on the streets. The C&S laid a temporary track up Main Street to aid in hauling the mud and debris away. This image is looking south, and several interesting buildings can be seen on both sides of the street



This one-story brick building would be an interesting model project. I like the arched brick window and door openings, and the brick cornice. Also, the building is angled at the corner where Gregory and Main Streets meet. I have not been able to find out any good information about what this building was used for




To the south of the building shown in the previous photo was this neat little livery stable. This structure disappeared several decades ago, but can be seen in image L-213 in the Denver Public Library, Western History Collection. I like the swaybacked wood shingled roof, the weathered vertical board siding, and advertising signs that paper the side and front of the building




Moving south along the west side of Main Street, we come to this nice looking cluster of buildings. I do not know what the left hand building was used for, but note the wood steps up to the first floor and addition on the back. The center building was used as a bakery (Holdback, "Central CIty Then and Now, published 1961 by Sage Books), and then as a cafe (Harry Brunk in the October 1981 Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette). The building at right was Ben Olson's saloon. The upper floor was used by the I.O.O.F (Odd Fellows) about a century ago. The sloping Main Street required the wooden sidewalks also follow the sloping street. The doorway openings at adjacent buildings are at different heights - another nice detail to model. Harry Brunk published drawings of the cafe and saloon




Two of the three buildings have survived  - the cafe and saloon. I like the combination of wood lap siding on the front of the cafe and the flat tin sheets on the sidewall. This contrasts nicely with the more elegant brick saloon building


Keith






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 Posted: Sat Nov 4th, 2017 06:24 pm
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Keith Pashina
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In this view, we're at the intersection of Main Street and Gregory Street, looking west up Gregory. The bridge is the Colorado Centra;/Colorado & Southern Central City Branch, heading upgrade to the first switchback. If I were to model this, the bridge nicely frames the scene, and is a nice divider between the foreground and background buildings. Like today's towns, there are several vehicles parked on the side of the unpaved street. Notice those white stones just in front of the wagon parked at right - these stones were strategically laid across the street for pedestrians to have sound footing when crossing the street, and when the road was muddy. Yet another nice detail to model




On the left side of the previous picture, you can see this building, named the Rohling Block, and it's still there today, 155+ years later. The lower floor housed shoe and clothing stores at various times, and the upstairs contained apartments. It is thought Baby Doe of Horace Tabor fame may have roomed here t one time
These and other photos we have looked are also show the different architectural periods for Black Hawk (and Central City) buildings. As Frank Hollenback wrote in "Central City Then and Now" (published 1961 by Sage Books): "Here are examples of three distinct building periods. The half-circle arches are typical of Central City and Black Hawk (and Denver) buildings of the 1860's; the slightly rounded ones, the 1870's. Those with the rectangular form date from the 80's and 90's to the present."



At this street intersection, the other side was just as interesting. Again, there is a combination of wooden and brick masonry buildings side by side, all squeezed into the narrow gulch with the mountainside nearby. The wooden building has a fancy painted front with clapboard siding, but the sidewall appears to unpainted vertical boards (also, note the neat covered stairway, which is also partly covered with paper advertising posters). The same store also has a clock hanging over this sidewalk. The more I look at this building, the more I am tempted to build a model of it



Back on Main Street, we come across the Gilpin Hotel. The brick version shown here was built to the original wood building (which became the kitchen addition, according to Hollenback). The hotel was built in 1896, and was run by several different operators until it inevitably closed. This building has been memorialized in Harry Brunk's drawings and article in the November/December 1981 Gazette, and some kits in different scales have been offered of this building. It's large (for Black Hawk, anyway) three-story front, prominent name painted at the cornice, and position in the middle of Main Street make it yet another iconic structure for anyone modeling Black Hawk




The Gilpin Hotel was a survivor into the 1980s as a business, then seemed to close. This image was taken by Bob Axsum I think in the early 1980s, when the building was still in use. I peered into the windows the first time I saw it in 1986, and it was gutted an appeared there may even had been a fire at one time












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