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Steam Donkey - For The 'T.C.B.' - 1:24 Scale
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 Posted: Sun Jun 11th, 2006 08:30 pm
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Dave D
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I will be needing at least 3 donkey engines for the TCB.

2 working the loading area (
McLean's Landing)
and 1 as a load.


I said earlier that I would scratchbuild everything.

Well... As I look down the road a bit...
That could mean adding a few YEARS to this build.

I don't want that.
But I do want to scratchbuild one of them...

I'll use kits for the others,
to speed the process up a bit.


So... Here I go...

First the boiler.
I started with a hardwood dowel.






I picked up a cheesy hobby wood lathe,
from Harbor Freight Tools.

Not the most powerful, but it was not built to be.
Just enough power to struggle through this though.


I downloaded an image of a boiler, and printed it out.

Then  I started messing with it in a
photo editing program, to get the size I wanted.

Once that was done...

I extended critical outline lines to the edge of the paper,
so I could transfer them to the round dowel blank.

Like this...


 


Then I just whittled away,
till I had the stack near the size I wanted...

Then just cut the angle,
from the boiler top to the base of the stack.

This was the result...






From there I used an idea I had, after I built
the boiler for the Class-A, I did a while back.

I used a wooden bit like this,
inserted into a brass tube.

Then I used pin heads to simulate rivets.
This was much easier and I like the look better.


I took some medium thickness embossing sheetmetal,
and wrapped it around the blank.

Then I marked off the overlap I wanted... About 1/8"






Then flattened the piece out, and cut it to length and width,
on a paper-shear, to be sure it was square.


Then, I drew 3 lines on it in pencil...


I then placed it on a hobby cutting-mat, this is important,
because you want to be able to press into it.
 
You want a firm surface underneath,
that will give a little, but not too much.

Then I used a metal-scribe... Not a sharp one,
but fairly dull, so as not to poke through the sheet.

I lined my O-scale rule with the first line,
and pressed with the tip of the scribe at 3" intervals.


I have Ponce Wheels,
but I only use those for 1 line of rivets.

Here I will have 3, and those are offset.


I did the first row, then I moved to the next line,
offset the rule marks by 1/2 the length of the spaces,
and did this line.

Then, I moved the rule to the 3rd line,
and again offset the marks to match the first row.

This is the result of that...





After I did these 3 rows,
I did the same to the top and bottom.

I also cut a stack the same way,
and I did the main body of the boiler,
and small strip, to simulate rivets on the angled piece.


So you know... I messed up the first set of metal covers,
when using epoxy, to glue them to the blank... It was a mess.

So, the ones you see attached to the blank,
are actually a different set I redid.


I used these pics. because I had already taken them,
and did not care to re-shoot them.

This is where it is at right now,
before paint and weathering.


If I were to do it again...
I would etch the parts before gluing them on.

Maybe I still can do it... We'll see.





I will add more details to this later...
Piping and fire door, valves and gauges etc.

Now on to the framework for the winches...

:moose:




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My father worked in profanity the way other artists might work in oils or clay. It was his true medium, a master.
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 Posted: Sun Jun 11th, 2006 10:26 pm
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Damien
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Very nice work Dave !

:thumb:  :apl:  :thumb:  :apl:  :thumb:  :apl:  :thumb:  :apl:


We seem to have A LOT of Masters here !!

And a few apprentices coming on as well Sir.

:thumb:  :thumb:  :thumb: 


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 Posted: Mon Jun 12th, 2006 12:49 am
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Dave D
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Thanks big D !

I don't know about that Master stuff.

:doh:

I think of myself as a Jack of all trades,

And... Well... You know the rest !!

:moose:



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 Posted: Mon Jun 12th, 2006 02:54 am
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Paladin
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Looks very good Dave !

I always follow your builds with great interest.


The 'How To' is easy to follow,

and you are good enough to tell us of your bloopers.


Saves others from the same fate.


Many thanks.

Paladin




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Don McL
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 Posted: Mon Jun 12th, 2006 04:56 pm
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Dave D
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Thanks guys !


I worked on a spool for it this morning.
This was done on the mini lathe too.

After I shaped it and sanded it,
I brushed CA over the whole thing...

And then sanded it again,
to keep any wood-grain from showing.





I dug through my parts jar...

And found a gear I could work with.
A plastic one I harvested from a junk clock.


I sanded it thin, and then I snipped it once,
to slide it over the spool shaft.

Then I glued it in place with some CA.





I will mount it with that space hidden.





Here are the mounts I built for it, using styrene,
and some thin bands of the embossing sheet material.





This is where I am going with it...

I built that frame, by the seat of my pants,
just to get the feel of it.

I see it will be too small.

I will either enlarge that one, or just start again,
and this time I will do a scale drawing, to get it right.







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 Posted: Wed Jun 14th, 2006 01:09 pm
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Dave D
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Well, I reworked the frame...

I made it 1/2" wider, and 1" longer.

Also not happy with the mount for the front spool,
so going to try and come up with something else.





I also built a keg type water-tank for it.





Okay... So the riveted bands are not right.

Sometimes your eyes are opened a bit more,
when you see things larger in the photos.

That's one of the reasons I call my digital camera,
one of my favorite modeling tools.


All was not lost...

Because now, I know how to make longer bands,
should I want them in the future.

I did redo those.





I like those bands much better.


And finally I made the other spool.

This one took a little longer,
because I had to make it match the first one.


Here it is mocked up so far...





I see I must have bumped the base,
and threw the front spool out of whack.

There is no bottom in that area.


I am thinking of using a brace,
that will run the width of the frame.

With 2 tube "hangers" rising up from that,
on either side of the spool, to hold it.




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 Posted: Thu Jun 15th, 2006 04:01 am
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Paladin
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That is coming along a treat !

One question :-

How did you form the barrel ?

Paladin




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Don McL
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 Posted: Thu Jun 15th, 2006 03:05 pm
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Dave D
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Don

I did the barrel like this...





1) Cut a length of round stock (dowel)
    the height you want the barrel.

2) Round over the ends a bit.

3) Draw a centerline on both ends.

4) After staining stripwood the color you want, cut pieces,
    to cover the ends, a little longer than the stock is wide,
    and using the center line, glue the first on... I used CA.

5) Using that one to keep the others in line,
    add them until the end is covered on one half.

6) Then do the other side of the end.

7) Turn it over, so the boards are on the bottom,
    and the dowel is standing up on them.

8) Using an Exacto knife... A sharp one !
    Cut stuff that is sticking out from the dowel edges off,
    till there is a small ridge left.

9) Take sandpaper... Round them to the shape of the stock,
    and repeat the process on the other side.

10) Now draw a center line down the side of the blank.

11) Now cut your stripwood bits a hair longer than the blank,
      so they will form a ridge past the ends,
      and glue the first one on along the center line,
      making sure to center the piece, so that there is close
      to the same amount of overhang on each side.

12) I apply the CA to the strip... Center it along the line...
      Holding the ends down so it stays formed to the blank.
      You only need hold it till the count of 10, and it is done.

13) Using the first strip... Glue the others butting them
      up to the preceding strip as you go around.

14) When you get to the end... If you are real lucky...
      You wont be... The last will fit in perfectly.

15) As I said you wont be... So trim the last bit
      to the width needed, glue that in place, and BINGO !


Now you just need to add the strips of brass,
or whatever you decide to use with the basic barrel.

I took a break today to do this little 'How To',
and have to do some extra stuff for work.

So no modeling for me today.

:( Grrrrrr !




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My father worked in profanity the way other artists might work in oils or clay. It was his true medium, a master.
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 Posted: Sat Jun 17th, 2006 08:41 am
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Paladin
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Thanks Dave.

You always make what could be difficult,

seem so easy.

Paladin




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Don McL
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 Posted: Sun Jun 25th, 2006 08:43 pm
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Dave D
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It's rainy and windy here,
so I was able to do some modeling today.

I started yesterday afternoon,
but there was a storm moving through,
and we lost power from 4 pm till 11:30 pm,
so that crushed that plan.

I did get some more done this morning though,
and hope to do more this afternoon.


FYI... If some of  it looks crooked in the pics.
it is because I have not glued anything together yet.

The only thing glued tight,
are the pieces forming the framework sitting on the skids...





That center support needs to be stained yet.

I had a different set in there,
but decided I wanted it wider,
so had to make new ones.





It's getting there, slow but sure.




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My father worked in profanity the way other artists might work in oils or clay. It was his true medium, a master.
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