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Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.I
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 Posted: Sun May 29th, 2016 08:59 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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Well,

I am learning all kinds of interesting things about Nederland Colorado. Alwin, thank you for pointing origin of the town's name. I need to look up the history of this town.

And Woodie, yes, the "ice man" is still there in Nederland.  Apparently, Nederland was an early recipient of cryogenically frozen deceased. The town fathers were not happy when the first local resident tried to do this. However, the town eventually came around and now, each winter, they celebrate "Frozen Dead Guy Days". The local family that tried to do this could not afford to keep the body in liquid nitrogen, so used regular ice instead. Today, the town regularly loads 3/4 ton of frozen ice each month into the "freezer", since the local originators apparently were deported back to Norway!

What does this have to do with narrow gauge? Well, Nederland is close to Gilpin County, so we'll just leave it at that.

Keith

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 Posted: Sun May 29th, 2016 09:13 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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Today, as part of a Colorado vacation, i spent some time in the town of Silver Plume, nearby in Clear Creek County. Like the mining around Central City, Silver Plume had many precious metal mines at one time.  The town was served by the C&S narrow gauge, and is still served by narrow gauge today!


My wife and I hiked up a local trail above Silver Plume today. This is a a view partway up the trail, overlooking the interesting town of Silver Plume. In the center distance, you can see the yards, shops and depot of the 3' gauge Georgetown Loop Railway, a tourist hauling line that runs over the former C&S railroad grade, including a rebuilt bridge at the loop


The trail we took switchbacks back and forth high above Silver Plume, and we passed over 15 shafts along the way. There are a few of the mining structures left


One of the mine locations had an aerial tramway that ran to Silver Plume, far below. Although the upper tram terminal building has collapsed, all of the tram equipment is still there. I got very interested in aerial trams after seeing the remains of the aerial tramway on Quartz Hill, along the Gilpin Tram


Nearing the end of our hike, we encountered this view - more mining remains, in a very picturesque site


This was today's hike's destination - the Clifford Grififin  Memorial, perched high above the Clear Creek valley below. This hike was well worth it - great views of the Rockies, and interesting mining sites along the way. The trail was also pretty good for wildflowers and wildlife

What was the Clifford Griffen Memorial all about? Apparently, he was the mine manager at the nearby 7:30 Mine, and died in 1887. Information from the Silver Plume town info site gives this information: "Griffin became wealthy from mining gold and silver in the area, but he was always depressed because of the death of his fiancee the night before they were to get married. He was known for playing a violin outside of his mountain cabin at the end of the day. The residents would come together and listen to his mournful songs. One night, after the applause for him had stopped, a shot was heard. The miners hurried to his house and found him dead in a grave that he had prepared for himself.  A note was found requesting that he be left in the grave, and that was the reason for shooting himself while standing near it."

This trip is giving me all kinds of ideas and energy for modeling the Gilpin Tram, and it will be fun to start some new modeling projects.

Keith

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 Posted: Wed Jun 1st, 2016 07:20 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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The Crown Point and Virginia Mine

The May/June Narrow Gauge and Shortline Gazette has a wonderful article on Lind Wickersham's Crown Point and Virginia Mine. Lind is a prolific Gilpin Tram modeler, and his O scale model will be part of his steadily-building On2 layout.



Lind's O scale contest model was entered in the Houston National Narrow Gauge Convention last year, and Lind won the Gazette Award!



The Crown Point and Virginia Mine was located at the head of Virginia Canyon, in Clear Creek County. Although it was not directly served by the Gilpin Tram, there are records showing it received coal shipments on the GT. I assume that the coal cars were dropped off at a spur on Pewabic Mountain, and then the coal drawn by horse-drawn wagon to the mine

Keith

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 Posted: Wed Jun 1st, 2016 07:31 pm
   
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Herb Kephart
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Lot of  work invested in that model--certainly merited a prize.

Herb



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 Posted: Thu Jun 2nd, 2016 12:39 am
   
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Bill U
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The model is great and I can imagine what his layout will look like.

Bill Uffelman

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 Posted: Thu Jun 2nd, 2016 03:54 am
   
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Ray Dunakin
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Yep, excellent model!



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 Posted: Sun Jun 5th, 2016 02:29 am
   
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Salada
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Keith :

Any idea why the Crown Point headgear had such a fancy little cabin (with windows !) on top ?. High snowfall area perhaps ? - but that wouldn't require anything so ornate.

There is an excellent photo at the Denver Library Digital Collection; Call Number X-61513

Regards,                Michael

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 Posted: Sat Jul 9th, 2016 03:18 am
   
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Mark E
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Keith,

  I noticed it's been kindva quiet on this thread, so I thought I would chime in. I'm new on FreeRails, having only joined the other day, but I've been following this thread for quite some time. Generally I would look once in awhile, but not read everything. Finally, earlier this week and being on vacation, I decided to carefully read through the entire thread!! Lots of good information, material, and people too. This thread was one of the reasons why I've joined FreeRail.

  Now, back to the thread. Back in post #308, the subject of the differences between orthochromatic and panchromatic photography came up. I remembered an article I had seen and went to the trouble of photocopying so that I could refer to it quickly when I needed it. I got it out when I got to post #308 and reviewed it again.

  For those who can, the article is in the Mar/Apr 1992 of NGSL Gazette entitled "Refrigerator Cars of the Colorado & Southern, Part 4: Conclusion: Colors, Lettering Styles, and Modeling" and written by Derrell W Poole. Beginning on page 69, he dives right into the color issue, and that is how to discern the various shades of black and white and relating to actual colors. In a nutshell, several statements were made. First and I quote: "Orthochromatic emulsions introduced in the mid-1870s were an improvement over prior emulsions, but they still did not record red (and red mixtures such as orange) 'naturally,' and pure red appeared black." Second and again I quote: "Thus, most photos taken before 1933 used orthochromatic emulsion and show reds and red mix in darker than natural tones." Last quote: "The father of Gazette author and noted C&S modeler, Jim Wild, is a ceramics engineer. According to him, the primary colors of paint readily and cheaply available during the last century (and the first few decades of this one) were: white, black, and red."

  There's alot more in the article and it's a good read, but it's has helped me with discerning what I'm actually seeing in a period B&W photo. Judging from all of the B&W's in this thread, one could say: "The hills are alive with the color red".

Mark

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 Posted: Mon Jul 11th, 2016 04:11 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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Mark, regarding colors - always seems to be an issue with the Gilpin Tram. Since none of the rolling stock or locos lasted into the color film era, and none of them survived, we have only educated guesses about what colors everything was.

Garrie Tufford showed me once a study of Native American beadwork, filmed with different types of films and emulsions. What I remember from it was that unless you knew what exact film emulsion was used in the original photo, many colors would be impossible to determine.

So, I think that any modeling of the Gilpin Tram can involve whatever colors seem to be a reasonable guess. For example, oxide red or mineral brown ore cars, instead of Pullman Green (although, there have been some good discussions as to whether the ore cars were painted black instead of red).

It's a good thing that the Gilpin Tram never had any Tiffany Reefers, or we'd all be puzzling as to what the true color was!

Keith

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 Posted: Mon Jul 11th, 2016 04:11 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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Mark, regarding colors - always seems to be an issue with the Gilpin Tram. Since none of the rolling stock or locos lasted into the color film era, and none of them survived, we have only educated guesses about what colors everything was.

Garrie Tufford showed me once a study of Native American beadwork, filmed with different types of films and emulsions. What I remember from it was that unless you knew what exact film emulsion was used in the original photo, many colors would be impossible to determine.

So, I think that any modeling of the Gilpin Tram can involve whatever colors seem to be a reasonable guess. For example, oxide red or mineral brown ore cars, instead of Pullman Green (although, there have been some good discussions as to whether the ore cars were painted black instead of red).

It's a good thing that the Gilpin Tram never had any Tiffany Reefers, or we'd all be puzzling as to what the true color was!

Keith

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