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Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.I
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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2016 09:26 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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The Druid Mine site would have been somewhere in the tree-covered hillside to the left. This view is looking west up Willis Gulch, and the Frontenac Mine can be seen at the far rear

DRUID MINE

The Druid Mine was a successor to the Searle Mine, and also operated the Kokomo Mine. The 1909 Engineering and Mining Journal reported, “Druid - in Willis gulch, a new shaft house is to be erected at the Searle shaft and additional equipment is to be installed under the direction of Max Boehmer, consulting engineer, formerly of Leadville.”
On March 7, 1907, the the Mining News magazine reported “4 cars of smelting ore and 2 cars of tailings” were shipped. In 1922, the American Mining Journal reported 15 men were employed at this mine.

The USGS 1961 Economic Geology Report, stated “the property is an old one and was probably opened prior to 1880; it was last worked in 1904.” The Kokomo  Mine was a shipper on the Gilpin Tram, and the January 1911 Mining Science magazine reported, contradictory to the USGS report, that “The Kokomo Mine in Willis Gulch, operated by James Chellew & Co., is producing a good grade of ore from the 500-ft. level. Six cars of smelling ore were shipped to the Golden smelter during last month and brought returns of $25 at one and since cars treated in the Iron City mill brought returns of $9 a ton.”


Some building ruins where the branch grade crosses Willis Gulch

This mine did not have a spur laid directly to it - it may have shipped from the Searle Mine spur that was located between the Twoton Mine and Hazeltine Mine, as that would have been very close to the mine shaft. The November 24, 1913 Mining Investor magazine reported “Work has been resumed on the Kokomo mine in Willis Gulch, Gilpin County, owned by the Druid Mining company.” The Engineering and Mining Journal, in August 1908 reported “Druid Mining Company - Arrangements are being made for the installation of a larger hoisting plant at the Searle Mine, and the Gilpin Tramway Company will build a switch for handling the ores.”

The 1899 Colorado State Bureau of Mines report indicated the Searle operation had several different workings, , and was being worked with 5 men. Other records notes the Druid was a very prolific shipper at times. In October 1907, this mine shipped 28 cars - 1 to the Chamberlain Sampling Works, 17 to the New York Mill, and 4 to the Tucker Mill. The next month, they shipped 26 cars - 19 to the Tucker Mill, and 7 to the C&S transfer ore chutes. The Druid Mine also received water shipments, from the tram’s water tank car. Other records show traffic from this mine at least until 1914.

Colorado and Southern correspondence from 1904 states that the “Missouri Switch” location was the ore loading point for both the Searle and Druid Mines.


This view is looking east, and down Willis Gulch. The mine waste dump i the center rear is the Anchor Mine site

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2016 09:32 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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This map, drawn by Dan Abbott, shows the lower half of the Anchor Mine branch

M.P. 45.13    SWITCHBACK No. 1

Continuing on eastward, we wind around Willis Gulch, getting lower in elevation, and passing some mine ruins, now lying flat on the ground. The hillside here is not rocky, just moderately sloped, and tree covered.  The Anchor Branch dead ends on the hillside, immediately above the Hazeltine Mine.

M.P. 45.20    SWITCHBACK No. 2

The grade now heads westward, and less than 400’ later, reaches the turnout for the second switchback.

M.P. 45.22    SWITCHBACK NO. 2 END OF TAIL TRACK

This switchback tail track is 105’ long - maybe long enough for a shay and four ore cars.


Along the way to the Hazeltine and Anchor Mines, this small bridge and dry-laid stone walls remain where the Gilpin Tram crosse a small drainage ditch


Another view of the same bridge


Heading east, we approach the site of the Hazeltine Mine ruins. In this view, the stone wall remains can be seen




Last edited on Wed May 11th, 2016 09:32 am by Keith Pashina

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2016 09:40 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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The Hazeltine Mine around 1908. This is the only view I have ever seen of this mine from when the Gilpin Tram was running

M.P. 45.29    HAZELTINE MINE

This is one of those mines I have never been able to find much information. Although the mine is sandwiched between the 1st and 2nd switchbacks, there are no records indicating this mine was a Gilpin Tram shipper. In 1896, the Hazeltine Mine was being operated by the Hamilton Mining and Milling Company, and being worked by 35 men. There was a mill connected to the mine, and had a forty tons per day capacity, using rolls, jigs, and amalgamators. Unusually, the amalgamating plates were electrified, being powered by an on-site Edison dynamo.


Some nice stone wall ruins remain at the Hazeltine Mine


On the north side of the mine, the shaft is mostly collapsed and filled in. The timber structure is the remains of a Cornish pump, used for dewatering the mine


The Cornish pump had a large steam cylinder at the surface. This cylinder pulled down one side of the wood frame, which was hinged at the center. Then, on the backstroke, the other side of the wood framed fulcrum descended down the shaft. This end was connected to a pump rod that extended to the bottom of the shaft, to a pump box. The heavy weight of the rod pushed down on the plunger in the pump box, forcing water up piping to the surface.

These simple machines could pump an enormous amount of water in a 24-hour period. The Saratoga Mine also was reported to have had a Cornish pump

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2016 09:47 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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Here is a good view of the Cornish pump remains at the Hazeltine Mine


The top of the collapsed shaft had some very precise, dry laid stone work, typical of the "Cousin Jack" Cornish miners who once worked here. The Cousin Jack  moniker referred to mine owners, who, when asking a Cornishmen if he knew of others seeking employment, always seemed to have a Cousin named Jack who was available. I heard similar things in the copper mining country in Upper Michigan, too


Also in the vicinity of the Hazeltine Mine was this jig box, perhaps from the long-demolished mill section of this mining operation

M.P. 45.60    SWITCHBACK No. 3

After leaving the Hazeltine Mine, the branch grade levels out somewhat, and extends about 1,500’ out to  near the end of the line.

M.P. 45.65    SWITCHBACK No. 3 END OF TRAIL TRACK

The grade here is more or less flat, on a gentle, tree-covered hillside. The grade is set into the ground, and not elevated above the surrounding terrain.


This is how the Hazeltine Mine site looks today. About 3 or 4 years ago, the EPA did some cleanup of the waste rock dump, leaving the former dump condition looking like this today



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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2016 09:52 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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This is one of two images I have seen of the Anchor Mine, taken about 1908 for a local souvenir booklet. A better picture can be found on page 202 of Dan Abbott's "The Gilpin Railroad Era", published by Sundance Books

M.P. 45.69    ANCHOR MINE SHAFT HOUSE

Information about the Anchor Mine is hard to come by. It appeared to have been opened in 1890, and operated to about 1910. Dan Abbott’s research showed there may have been two spurs located here. Some references refer to this mine as the “Anchor Mine and Mill”, and the one clear photo of this mine shows a shaft house with a building that looks like a typical Colorado stamp mill. The Anchor Mine was opened in about 1890, and first worked no later than 1902. In 1902, the mine was reopened, and was worked until 1945. Surviving  Gilpin Railroad reports show that in 1908, 6 cars of ore were shipped on August 5, 2 more on August 13, 1 car on August 21. Surviving records show 1909 was the best year, with 2,925 tons of ore shipped. It appears the mine may have shipped its last ore in 1911.There may have been a lot more shipments, but those records have not survived.

This was the end of the Anchor Mine Branch.


This is how the Anchor Mine site looks like today - all of the structures have been torn down, except for one very important one


Hidden in the trees, next to the former Gilpin branch grade, is this two-holer outhouse


The end

Keith

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 Posted: Wed May 11th, 2016 10:04 am
   
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Ray Dunakin
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That outhouse looks to be in better condition than most of the actual mine and mill ruins.

Thanks for the great pics and info!



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Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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 Posted: Thu May 12th, 2016 08:54 pm
   
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Herb Kephart
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Thank you Keith!

A lot of work involved in what you have generously given us.

Herb



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 Posted: Fri May 13th, 2016 06:44 am
   
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NevadaBlue
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Thanks Keith! Nice work.



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 Posted: Sun May 15th, 2016 12:40 am
   
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Salada
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The photographed remains at the Hazeltine Mine are a little more complicated than a simple Cornish pump. I could bore for hours if required......

Thanks Keith for a fascinating, interesting & informative subject. Where next ??!!

Regards,       Michael

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 Posted: Sun May 15th, 2016 01:27 am
   
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Keith Pashina
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Michael,

I would be very interested in what other information you have about the mine ruins and artifacts at the Hazeltine Mine, and I would guess others would, too.

As for the next stop? Why, Black Hawk and the yards and mills, of course. That will take a while to poke through. I'll likely start at the engine house area and head up to the Wheeler Mill, then back down Clear Creek towards the Iron City Mill.

Keith

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