View single post by elminero67
 Posted: Sat Jun 30th, 2012 07:09 pm
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elminero67



Joined: Sun Dec 27th, 2009
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I agree, the trackwork looks great, alot of good switching possibilities.

It appears that the good stuff I have on Guaymas and Sonora are buried in the attic...when I was putting the Sonora Narrow Gauge book together I had started doing research on all of the proposed railroads in Sonora and was going to include a chapter on them. I also considered expanding the book to cover all of the railroads in Sonora, similar to the late David Myricks "Railroads of Arizona" or Railroads of Nevada" series.In the end the project was just overwhelming; I was working full time and commuting 200 miles each way to grad school. The Sonora book was intended as the first in a series, but in the end, book sales have not covered the expenses of putting it all together, so there is not likely to be a "Narrow Gauge of Chihuahua" book in the near future, even though there is even better narrow gauge action in Chihuahua.

One of the questions people might ask is why the port of Guaymas is the site of so many schemes. As mentioned, the Gulf of California is the closest Ocean port for locations south and west of Kansas City, including Colorado, Az etc.. But while it appears to be a great destination on maps, it does have limitations: Namely the pesky Sierra Madre mountains and the fact that there are very few good ports in the Gulf of California. Most of the bays and inlets north of Guaymas are sandy and shallow, coupled with the large tides in the Gulf, made them impractical for large ships. While all of the proposed railroads mentioned Guaymas as their destination, there really isnt that much room for railroad yards and shops in Guaymas itself-the Sonora Railroad ended up putting all of the facilities/yards and shops a few miles south of Guaymas at Empalme. Over the course of time Empalme became legandary to railfans as the shops had such a wide variety of equipment and were known for keeping obsolete and rare equipment running long after other railroads had moved onto newer equipment, such as the former D & H PA-1 locos.

Heres a vintage view of Empalme looking accross the bay to Guaymas. As you can see, not much in the way of plants or greenery!



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