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Southern Pacific & Other N.G. Ramblings - 1:48
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 Posted: Mon Feb 19th, 2018 04:01 am
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chasv
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Well done.


I have seen a few of those corrals in real life,

and they look just like yours,

and it does look like the Owens Valley.
 



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 Posted: Mon Feb 19th, 2018 07:05 pm
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elminero67
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Thanks Charles, that was the effect I was going for.
Hope ya'll don't mind if I slow down a bit and take a closer look at the corral, and corrals in general. 

The Southern Pacific narrow gauge did do a fair amount of stock traffic in Owens Valley,
however, the prototype corral for the model is found on the Magdalena Branch of the Santa Fe in a remote area of western New Mexico.
I wanted to model a "cowboy corral", not a straight and square "corporate" stockyard or shipping pen constructed of milled lumber.
Those are interesting too, but not what I was looking for.  

What I find interesting is that no two cowboy corrals are alike, each one is unique.
They were built by Ma and Pa cattle operators who didn't have a lot of cash, but knew their cattle and weren't afraid of hard work.
Materials for the cowboy corral are whatever the cowboys could drag from the nearby hills rather than purchased materials.
For example, in New Mexico where the prototype was located,
the only wood available for miles was stunted oaks and junipers, so they used them.
In more northern climates, they often used Lodgepole or Ponderosa pine,
which were easier to work with, but don't tend to last very long.
In some areas, like the Hill Country of Texas, I've seen corrals made of carefully stacked stone,
or more commonly, a combination of wood and stone: 
  






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 Posted: Thu Feb 22nd, 2018 05:18 am
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elminero67
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And a pic of the corral that inspired the model,
this one still stands along the abandoned right-of-way to the Magdalena branch of the AT&SF.
Safe to say there are more cattle than folks in that area. 

Attachment: IMG_0113 resized.jpg (Downloaded 319 times)



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 Posted: Thu Feb 22nd, 2018 05:32 am
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elminero67
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I wasn't going to post this pic as it was an earlier effort to Photoshop a background in,
and it has lots of booboos... like the lighting is wrong...
but some things do work: Like matching the dusty, sun-bleached alkili soil (the road is real).
This is near the old Dolomite siding on the Southern Pacific narrow gauge a few miles north of Keeler.

Attachment: Dolomite siding resized.jpg (Downloaded 110 times)



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 Posted: Thu Feb 22nd, 2018 06:43 am
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Steven B
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I like the composition.
Glad you posted it even though it looks as if we're on Luke Skywalker's planet with two suns. 
Hehehehehe. 
Thanks for sharing!



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Steven B.
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 Posted: Fri Feb 23rd, 2018 08:00 am
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elminero67
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I thought this one came out a bit better:







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 Posted: Fri Feb 23rd, 2018 08:19 am
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Steven B
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:bow: Excellent!



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 Posted: Fri Feb 23rd, 2018 09:22 am
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W C Greene
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Duane, simply wonderful work. The corral is mui excellente.

Woodie



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 Posted: Fri Feb 23rd, 2018 07:45 pm
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slateworks
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Photos are definite candidates for "is it real or a model" thread! Most impressive Duane.



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 Posted: Fri Feb 23rd, 2018 08:24 pm
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Michael M
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Great scenery!

Liking your soil or dirt (I collect dirt).

How about some 'how-to' descriptions?



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