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Kevin Fall
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Greetings from Moodus, CT (home of eastern micro earthquakes)
I know, where the heck is Moodus anyway?
Moodus is short for the Native American word "machimoodus" which means "the place of bad noises".

Not to worry because we are 3 miles from the fault line and the last major earthquake was on May 16, 1791!
I hope we are not overdue.
Although, we did have a small one in 2015 a half mile away but we slept through it.


Having viewed this forum for several years I bravely decided to add my name to those on the other side of the tracks.


I am modeling a freelanced C&S /Gilpin in the year 1918 which allows me to model one of my favorite stamp mill scenes,
the Iron City/Penn (Rose-City Ore Company) mill in Black Hawk and some mines in the Clear Creek area.
Though freelanced, I am trying to use mostly C&S buildings and bridges to get the general feeling of the area.
I have built a cardboard mockup of the mill as it appeared in 1918 which comes out roughly to 3 feet in HO scale (yikes!).
I imagine the ore cars will be pulled by horses at this point or the Fordson used by the mill.

Rail will be code 55 on handlaid ties for the C&S with Gilpin mill trackage code 40.
I am only at the beginning stages: benchwork done, backdrop painted just blue so far,
and all ties have been laid but only a short section of rail (This winter's project).

The 13 x 21 layout is in the basement and some scenery has been started with foam board and sculptamold.


I have been following Keith's forum on the Gilpin and since he is getting close to my mill I figured now was the best to join.
I partially started and stopped two layouts in my younger years but family life kind of took over.
Now I finally have some spare time to really do something.
Pressure, pressure!
And yes, I am hoping to prove to everyone that HOn3 C&S engines can really run!


Anyway, thanks for letting me join.


Kevin


Si.
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Hi Kevin :wave:



WELCOME ! :bg:



Nothing like a bit of 2' ...

... or even a bit of 3' ! :P



When it comes to Gilpin County, word on the street says Keith is the horses mouth ...

... in fact some say Keith is the horse ! ;)



Keep us posted on how your project is going Kevin.



:)



Si.

Herb Kephart
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Hello Kevin, and welcome to the farm.

Great bunch here,  only a very few bite.

How about posting a few photos of those buildings that you have already built, or started?
We love to see photos.
Some folks have trouble posting them, but at the beginning of Freerails,  there are several different methods outlined.
If, after trying them, you still have problems, we will try to help out.

Herb


Kevin Fall
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Si,

Is there any way I can move this thread I had already started when I first joined?
I wanted it in the "Narrow Gauge" forum and because I didn't know what I was doing it ended up in the "Joining Freerails" forum.
Otherwise, I will have to start a new thread so it will be in the correct place.

Kevin



- - - - - - -



The Iron City/Penn/Frontenac mill.
Here is a colored postcard of the mill that I found several years ago.
After I saw this I knew I had to model it some day.
Several years went by and then The Gilpin Era book came out by Sundance which filled in most of the other views of the complex.





On this postcard it is called the Low Mill which is what I thought it was called before I saw the Sundance book.
Perhaps because it was in lower Black Hawk and the locals called it that? Not sure.
The cladding seems to stand out a bit more on the upper story.
I don't know if that helps identify it more as metal or tarpaper.
Any further guesses?





The trestle was always interesting to me.
The center posts form a V which seemed to be pretty unique to me.
Narrow gauge trestles use 1 foot diameter posts for their trestles.
Any guesses as to what the Gilpin might have used?
Do you think 10" or 8" posts might have been used as they would have had to support less weight although the cars were loaded with ore?
I figure the ties are 5" x 5" as on the rest of the railroad.





I am curious as to what the tall little building at the top of the mill was used for.
There are three windows and no apparent door for personnel to enter.
Maybe it is on the other side closer to the mill where in winter they can make a quick dash back to the mill!
Also there is some sort of horizontal bar on the end with what looks like support posts.
Anybody have any guesses as to what that is?
Can't model it unless I know what it is!





The mill has two tanks.
One tank up on the hill with a pipe leading down to the top of the Gilpin grade.
The other from a tank on the backside of the mill with a pipe leading across the tracks and into the back of the power house.
What were these two tanks used for?
Water for the boiler?
And what size do you think the pipes might have been?
Still lots of questions.
Anyway I am modeling the building as it appeared in 1918,
after the Gilpin had been abandoned but the mill was pulling the ore cars using horses.





The plans for the Penn Mill were from Mike Blazek.
I decided to make a mockup because it looked complex to me and to get a better idea of how to draw the rest of the mill.
His plans are excellent and was a great starting point.
The trestle is to come.





The addition between the two mills was made using a C&S 30 foot boxcar as reference from photos and relying on views in The Gilpin Era.
It was definitely trial and error and constantly comparing views.





The bridge of course was not there in real life but I liked the Clear Creek bridge and a compromise was made.
At least it was a bridge that existed on the C&S.
There's lots of windows and I lost count (or really don't want to count).
You can see a shed now exists on the roof of the addition to the Iron City mill where coal can be loaded that was added sometime in 1912.
Any idea if their would have been freight doors inside of the overhang on the Iron City mill close to the C&S tracks?
Would they have loaded ore from here as it was part of the remodeled Iron City mill?
I'm guessing the coal hatches are 4' x 5'.
They look about the correct size from the photos.





This is the other side of the complex showing the stone walls and the low single story building added later on top of the stone wall.





A view from the top.
Two stub switches have been made from code 40.
You can see one of the vats from behind the building.
I added a C&S style stone wall to the other side of the bank of Clear Creek.
Just couldn't keep going on with the log retaining wall.
Just starting trackwork.
Been avoiding making turnouts for years but found out it wasn't so bad after all.
And there's that H type bracket or whatever it is on the top of the little two story building by the Gilpin tracks.





Well that's it.


I will probably start actually building it this coming winter,
but I've never made a mockup before but found it was extremely useful because of the complexity of the buildings.


Kevin.



Si.
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Si. said :-


Hi Kevin :wave:


That looks about 100 :moose: s AWESOME !



You're gonna HAVE to start a New Thread with that great build underway !

Really want to hear more about it & see how you get on.



It would be great to see all the research photos & stuff in a New Thread as well.

You could probably Paste over what you have put here as a start.



Is your model HO scale Kevin ? ... You didn't actually say.



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.



- - - - - - -



Monte said :-


Kevin,

You have hit a home run with, first you muck up.
How large a space does the complex fill?
I agree Mike’s plans are outstanding.
Do you have the complete set of Gilpin Books from Mike.

Very nice creek retaking wall.

Keep sending photos.

Monte



- - - - - - -



( Canadian ) Ken C said :-


Kevin

Just a guess, but the tall structure above the mill could have been a transformer building.
The H fitting appears to have power lines going to it.
From what I've seen of various mill's, the transformer building or yard were usually located away from the main building's.

Ken



- - - - - - -



Kevin Fall said :-


Thanks guys!

I model in HOn3 with HOn3 for the Gilpin tracks for the mill.
From end to end the model takes up 3 feet 7 inches or a little over 109 cm for the rest of the world.

I will try to post on another thread that I had already started but in the wrong location because I didn't know what I was doing.

I don't have any of the Gilpin books from Mike,
just some plans but am relying on reference from the two Gilpin books and Keith's thread.

Kevin



- - - - - - -



Hi Kevin :wave:



I moved your original Thread into the 'HO Narrow Gauge' Forum HERE. :thumb:

Also pasted your Post with photos in ^^ above for you.

Also pasted in your replies above ^^ here as well.



You can of course EDIT any Posts, if you wish.

I just pasted over what you'd done, as a good start. :cool:



Please Post LOTS MORE as well.

I'm sure we could all stand to see many more angles & descriptions from your ACE mock-up !



If you want to change the TITLE and SUB-TITLE of the Thread, just ask.

You might have some different ideas now.

Personally I like to see full names like 'Colorado & Southern', not just C&S.

Just me though, maybe you think the same, let us know.



Looks good to me !! :)

All the best.



:moose:



Si.


Jason Sanford
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Very nice!!

You have captured the mill perfectly.
I have the Trains of Texas O scale Iron City Mill but it represents the mill as built.
I have yet to start it as I am still debating if I should do a full interior with all of the stamps and machinery.

Where did you get those beautiful rock wall castings?

Jason


Kevin Fall
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Hi Jason,

The answer is I cheated!
I have grouped all steps in the following photo.





I first bought three dry stacked stone walls from New England Brownstone (http://www.nebrownstone.com)
like the small wall in the photo.
All of his products have the most realistic stone castings I have seen.
I used the Dry Stacked Wall (small) for HO but the Dry Stacked Wall (large) has larger stones and would be appropriate for larger scales.

I glued them together in a straight line on a section of track where I intend to have a straight stone retaining wall.
I then filled in the gaps where the pieces joined and carved to make it appear as one wall.

Next I made a latex rubber casting of the long wall in the same way as making a rock mold casting.
I found the radius of the wall I needed for the track which in this case was a 20º curve.
I carved the curve out of foam insulation for a pattern,
making sure I had a slight angle to the wall so I wouldn't have a 90º vertical wall when finally in place.
Hard to see in the photo but the usable part is on the bottom side.
I took the latex casting and placed it on top of the 20º curve,
poured in some Hydrocal and let it set overnight so that it would not break when I took the casting out of the latex mold.





Then I glued a curved section onto the base followed by another curved section and a straight,
and I think another curved section section, patched between sections and done.





There is additional stone wall in front of the higher track wall you can see in some of the photos Keith posted.
The top of the lower wall runs into a large rock.
The top of that wall is not finished with a straight cap like the top of the track wall.

Hope that helps and hope this gets posted before I lose power.
Nor'easter in progress outside with 50 - 60 mph winds.
Power already lost a 1/2 mile away.

Si, you can change the subtitle from C&S/Gilpin to Colorado & Southern/Gilpin.

Happy modeling!

Kevin


Alwin
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Great work Kevin.

The mock up of the mill complex looks huge and a lot of modeling work.
But with the results you showed so far I'm sure it will look great.

Alwin


Jason Sanford
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Thanks Kevin!

I am going to order some of the NE Brownstone walls and see what I can get to work in O scale.
I am looking forward to some more photos of your progress.

Jason


Kevin Fall
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Hello again,

Here is an update on my layout.

I tend to move from one project to another as I get bored and want to see results.
One thing that is not organized is my workbench which is currently on my layout.
This is the main yard area where the roundhouse will be and the largest town, well someday anyway.





I am now working on scenery.
I use foam insulation as a base as it is easily carved although it can make a mess.
Then I cover it with Sculptamold, rock castings or plaster cloth.

Here is a view of two trestles in the distance before being covered with anything.

I'm trying to get a lot of the grunt work done before I start laying track,
which means rough scenery only as long as it won't interfere with any wiring or with building switches.





And after it was covered with Sculptamold.

The track closest to the viewer is the Gilpin HOn30 trackage to the Frontenac mill.
I need to cut back the log ties and the throw bar on the stub turnout as this is not quite working yet.





Here is the large trestle going over what will be a river.
The C&S had no such trestle,
but I liked it as it is a smaller version of what modeler Earl Smallshaw had on his layout which I first saw as a 15 year old.
He lived close by and I made many visits throughout the years.

I made a mockup of the Stanley mine from Harry Brunk's plan in the Gazette.
I originally planned for something else to go here but changed my mind and like this better.

I think that cloud painting is next on the list before I get to the backdrop painting of hills while everything is still accessible.





And here is a closeup from below.

The foundation footings are wood then covered with textured paint from Home Depot,
and will need to be sanded down and then weathered.
They will mostly disappear when covered with rock.





Here is the small trestle.

I am scribing in lines to represent the board forms for the concrete.
After weathering you will barely see them but I can sleep better at night.

Ha! The mine was not on the C&S but I liked it.
It is a Builders in Scale kit from many years ago and is still not complete.
It needs cable to the tower and some other things.

The buildings are just for placement.
This is the smallest village and there will just be some basic stores.





Here is the road leading in to town from over the hill.
I am currently building a retaining wall which was very common to the area.

The coke ovens are from Trains of Texas.
I had been trying to find an HO version of these for at least 20 years.
I just found some on eBay by sheer luck. 





That's it for now.

Happy modeling,

Kevin


Si.
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Hi Kevin  :wave:



WOW ! ... Too much too like !!  :shocked:

( except for your 'workbench' )


;)


The 'Stanley Mine' looks great.

I remember those drawings of Harry Brunks, years ago ...

... now somewhere in that stash of Gazettes   .   .   .   L:



The trestles are totally ACE work Kevin !  :thumb:

The whole picture seems to be coming together really well !!  :)



Did you have some drawings to work from, for the trestle with the central truss ? ? ???

Great design.



:bg:



Si.


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Wow!
That's some seriously nice modeling there.
I'm looking forward to following this thread.


Jason Sanford
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If you want more coke ovens, Southwest Narrow Gauge has some.

https://southwest-narrow-gauge.myshopify.com/collections/modeling-kits?page=31

They also have the run down ones that are pretty cool.

https://southwest-narrow-gauge.myshopify.com/collections/modeling-kits?page=32

I have all of these in O scale for my Gilpin layout.....someday!!!


Kevin Fall
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Here is a shot of Earl Smallshaw's big trestle which I first saw when I was 15 years old.
He was the reason I have stayed in the hobby for so long,
which is why I decided to model a smaller version with the deck truss in the middle.
His was HO and mine is HOn3 so I had to make the drawings to span the space I needed for the river. 








Here is a closeup of mine.





Here is my layout plan.

I model the year 1917 when all three of the following railroads were still in business,
but the C&S was the only one still around by the following year.
The green is the C&S HOn3, The blue is the Gilpin HOn30 and the red is the Colorado Midand HO standard gauge.

I wanted a layout with switching so there are 27 industries.
It is basically a point to loop layout for the narrow gauge.
The standard gauge is just there so I can have a continuous running train if I want.

And yes there are 3 hidden turnouts but all will be accessible.
Two of them are on the standard gauge which won't see much service anyway since the main focus is on the narrow gauge.
Since the C&S didn't have tunnels (except for the Alpine Tunnel),
I tried to disguise them with buildings and an overhead bridge but I will have to have one near the wye at end of track.





I don't know if the plan is legible, but I can't seem to attach just a jpeg of the plan.

Jason, thanks for the link to Southwest.
A lot of kits in there that I didn't know you could still get some of which I have and could never afford now!

Well up at 5:00AM to feed the cats and the big wedding.
Enjoy the celebration!

Happy Modeling,

Kevin


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" I don't know if the plan is legible, but I can't seem to attach just a jpeg of the plan "


Hi Kevin  :wave:



How's this ...  :thumb:






:)



Si.


Kevin Fall
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Si.

How the heck did you do that?
I was getting such crappy results and I was using Photoshop.
I can get any file to a printer for printing but when it comes to web design I'm at a standstill.
I'll have to use one of those little emoji's!
Your reward to come.

:glad:

Thanks,

Kevin


Kevin Fall
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Greetings,

It's been a while since I've posted but I've been making switches, doing track work, and scenery with rock molds. 
I'll try to post those next week. 

In the meantime my friend George Sebastian Coleman made me some bridle bars for my stub switches. 
They are available in two sizes through Shapeways; 

HOn3 code 55
(https://www.shapeways.com/product/D3UL2UPJY/hon3-code-55-stub-switch-bridle?optionId=66393355&li=marketplace) 

and HOn30/N scale code 40
(https://www.shapeways.com/product/MEAQVKA6M/hon30-code-40-stub-switch-bridle?optionId=66393303&li=marketplace).


The example below shows the bridle bars which correctly gauge the HOn3 code 55 rail,
and there is a hole for an operating lever giving it a realistic look.

The plastic bridles keep the rails insulated from each other. 
I am using .032 piano wire through the end hole that is attached to a Tortoise switch machine below.
 
I am also using the HOn30 code 40 bridle bars for my Gilpin track,
but manually operating those switches with a Precision Scale harp switch stand.


The example below shows the HOn3 code 55 stub turnout.

Here is what the bridle bars look like coming from Shapeways.







Here are the bridle bars installed on the stub switch. 
The pc ties need to be painted.







And here is the stub switch with the bridles painted and on the Homosote base. 

The switches operate smoothly with the Tortoise machines. 
I think I will have to add a lever from the switch stand to the long bridle bar. 
Also the wide harp stand tie is too short only clearing a boxcar by about a foot. 
I'm not sure how long these ties were but 14 feet is too short and I will need to make it longer.







Happy modeling, ;)

Kevin


Si.
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" How the heck did you do that ? "


Hi Kevin  :wave:



We have our special top secret methods !  ;)  :P





The stub switches look great !  :thumb:


How's things going with your Gilpin ?  ???



:moose:



Si.


Kevin Fall
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Greetings!

Si reminded me I haven't uploaded much as of late. :slow: I'm slow.
Lots of things going on over the past few months so here is an update.
These are taken with an iPhone and some of my lights are out so excuse the quality.


The Iron City/Penn stamp mill has taken a back seat because I have been building switches and laying track,
but I have done some work on the mill.

I have painted what I believe all of the windows that I need.
Won't be surprised if I missed a few. I count 130 in all. I decided to leave a few open.
Not really looking forward to the glazing all of them but I want to try real glass just to say I did.










And I have managed to get the basic trestle for the mill in place.
I cannot glue any bents to the top or permanently put it in place until I construct the buildings that will establish the final grade level.
It will be on a slight grade. Rock wall not at correct angle yet.





And of course there is the top deck.

In the prototype the ties facing the cliff were of various lengths depending on where the rock face was,
so they will be cut back when the final rock castings are done.

This is HOn30 Gilpin track with code 40 rail.
Since this is nonoperational track the switches are thrown manually with a PSC harp switch stand.
The decking is only partially finished waiting for the ties to be cut.

There is also a fence on the right side of the deck which will be the last thing added out of breakage fears.
You can see where the posts will be, as I have already allowed space for them in the wood deck planking.





The mill from the top.

You can see I have added some rock castings,
and between the rocks I have added some Sculptamold with some color added in as a base for the real dirt.





Moving to the left we can see more rock work and basic landscaping in the distance.





Moving further to the left as seen from the top of the mill more landscaping and a place for the small town.
Track has mostly been laid throughout here.





And finally the curve that goes to the back wall.





Back at track level we start at the mill. Switches made. Some track still be done.

I am using a borrowed N scale boxcar to make sure all of the stub switches work with rolling stock (which they do)
on the code 40 rail for the HOn30 ore cars I haven't built yet.





And looking back at the mill from trackside.
Pretend the N scale boxcar is not really there!  :P

I think this will be an cool view when it's done.
I can compare it to the prototype photos to check my roof angles.





Two switches on the back curve.
The rod sticking up is from the switch machine. It will be cut after everything is tested.

There will be a few houses on the hill with a sawmill below and other local businesses.





Coke ovens.





Someday this might make an interesting photo with the finished town and the road going up over the hill.
The buildings are only placeholders.

Is that a prototypical cobweb at the top of the ladder?





The unfinished mine with an unscaled thumbprint.  Time to dust!





The partially built mine and trestle with one retaining wall and a roughed in mine dump.





The rock cut.





More rock work and Sculptamold.





You can see the mine entrance.
It required two crossings of 18 gauge track over the 3 foot gauge.
One into the mine and one to where the mine dump will be.

Need some more rock castings.
I am finishing up on those and hope to post next week.
Promise, promises.





A look under the table where the Tortoise switch machines will be mounted.





The big rock face with the river in the gorge below.





And the knives for any visitors who says "Those trains are so cute". 





And still no clouds or painted backdrop!


Happy modeling.
Kevin


Si.
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" ... the knives for any visitors who says "Those trains are so cute".

And still no clouds or painted backdrop! "



Hi Kevin  :wave:



Simply AWESOME progress on your VERY ambitious project !  :thumb:



I like the 'knives'.  :w: ;)

But 'still no clouds' ... I guess I'll have to bring my shades then.  :cool:



I agree with Doug, who wouldn't, the bridges & mountainous landscape are looking ACE !  :)



It's great to see, even quite large buildings, dwarfed by the surrounding terrain ...  :shocked:

... just as it was in Gilpin County & possible to achieve in HOn as you've shown.



My only complaint is ...

... don't make us hang on so long for an update !  :time: :P  ;)



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.


Kevin Fall
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Greetings,

I have a place behind the Stanley mine where the 18" gauge track from the mine,
switches into two tracks and crosses over a narrow gauge siding for the Stanley mine building.

One track goes into the main building, and one goes to the mine dump.

In the prototype photo the mine trackage actually does go through a switch, and goes over the 3 foot into the building,
and it is impossible to see if it goes over the track a second time, but for my purposes it does.

The prototype photo shows the crossing in the distance, so no closeup details are available to see what it looks like.

My first question is, would they bother to spend the time using wing rails on the crossing for the 3 foot,
because it is only a siding with a small break in the rail to allow for the 18" gauge flanges on the mine cars going over the siding rail?

As you can see I have not added any wing rails, but there is a smaller cut in the 3 foot rail.

Keep in mind that the siding rail is obviously larger (code 55),
and the mine trackage is smaller (code 40-probably a little big, but that's the smallest size available). 

A series of photographs showing the backside of the Stanley mine is currently on eBay,
where you can see what I am talking about.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/STANLEY-MINE-CLEAR-CREEK-COUNTY-COLORADO-gold-mining-photographs-ca-1890/123631387155?hash=item1cc9014213:g:7M0AAOSwLKhcWgUJ





My switch is a stub switch, which I assume mines would have used at the time (1918) as well as point switches.  Easier for me to build!  ;)

I cannot find any prototype photos of switches for mine trackage that shows how they threw the switch.
I can find photos of diverging tracks, but not the switch stand.
 
A harp switch that might be used for the narrow gauge is way too large for 18" gauge trackage,
so did they use some sort of a ground throw, or a miniature switch stand?

So before I glue the track down I need to figure this out.
I have tried looking through the various posts on Freerails, but to no avail.

Any help would be appreciated.





And rock coloring would be nice someday, that's true!


Plugging along,

Kevin


Ken C
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Kevin

Although I can find numerous mining related photos, the photo of a switch stand I have remains to be found.

Photo is a similar switch stand on a 2 foot mining Rly. in Brazil.

Slightly fancier then the one I came across.
Switch throw should be straight and hinged on cross bars at base of switch.
Had U shaped supports on both sides, spaced for throw.
A chain and pin were attached to the throw to lock it in place when swung over.

Will keep looking for the photos.





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Howdy Kevin, nice work on the crossings.
I assume that there are regular stub switches used on 18"ga. mine trackage,
but most all the switches I have seen on 18" mine tracks are single point "kick switches" which don't have frogs or guard rails.
Just a single rail that is kicked (really!) back & forth to go from one track to another.
I don't have a photo I can get to right now but somebody out here probably has one.
If I can, I will snatch one from somewhere unless one gets posted.
Nice track laying by the way, very nice.

Woodie


Ken C
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Kevin

While looking for another photo,
came across a mine switch stand in one of them.

The drum / dryer was for a small mining operation,
which was used to dry Bog Manganese prior to shipment during WW1.

Production was between 250-1000 ton's.
Powered by a vertical boiler (long gone).





Kevin Fall
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Thanks Ken,

I'm really liking that second switch stand from the bog manganese mine.
And the time period is perfect since I am modeling 1918.

I think I can build that out of styrene.
It is simple and can be made small, which is what I was looking for.

Hope to post some more photos in a few days.

Happy modeling

Kevin


Ken C
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Kevin

I plan to get out West later this month or early July and remeasure both the switch stand and dryer.

Certain I will find my original measurements when I get back!.

Likely the switch stand would have been made by the mines blacksmith as needed.

Si.
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" ... nice work on the crossings "



Hi Kevin  :wave:



I'll 2nd that ... Indeed !  :thumb:



I hope things are going well with the layout.  ???



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.


Wayne Taylor
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Thanks again, Kevin, for the Como roundhouse instructions,

and for alerting me to this forum.

I'll be following it.

Wayne



Ken C
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Kevin

A couple of better photos of the mining switch stand,

will be a day or two before I draw up a rough set of plans to post.





Ken C
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Top end of switch stand.





Tom Harbin
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Wow Kevin,

I can't believe I missed this thread.
Great work.

Really nice track work and your mountains are spectacular. 

Post more.
This is really nice.

Tom


Kevin Fall
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Thanks for the new photos Ken.
That is such a great switchstand.

I wasn't going to post anything for another week or so,
but here is a partial update since Ken posted the two new photos.

I have made two mine dump trestles.
A small one for one of the mines was my first attempt to see how it would turn out.
This is for a newer mine so the mine dump is smaller and will not be that large.
The fence is too beat up for a newer mine so will be replaced.
It's just what I had on hand.
NBW's will hold the tie across the end of track.

I neglected to take an overall view to show the entire dump,
but that will turn up later.

A Sculptamold base is used for the base around the trestle,
and then tailings from Colorado will be used on the top.
Still need to put gravel behind the retaining wall.





The posts are 4 x 4's and I was debating whether to use 2 x 4's or 2 x 6's for the railings.

I finally went for 2 x 6's because I thought if someone was pushing the cart,
they'd want to make sure the railing didn't give away with any kind of bumping.
OSHA for my little guys!





So here is the double crossing again.

I really had the guilts after previously having no guardrails on the mine trackage,
and only on the main narrow gauge trackage.
It just didn't look right.

So hoping it wouldn't all fall apart when I got out the soldering gun,
I added the guard rails to the mine trackage.
It will all show up better once the dirt and tailings are around the trackage.
I was toying with the idea of cutting the long guardrail between the two crossings,
to keep them both independent,
but didn't want to test my luck with it all falling apart.

I don't want to finally attach the mine door until the scenery is painted.
Ken's switchstand will look great outside of the mine entrance.

And I also want to add a light from inside the mine.
I am undecided about using a grain of rice bulb that will burn out eventually,
or using some of that new LED lighting.
It might be time to kiss the old GOW bulb technology goodbye.
I don't know enough about LED lighting for miniatures,
and if there are even LED single bulbs available.
Maybe there are forums on that but I haven't looked yet.





So here is the mine dump trestle for the Stanley mine.

The problem here was that if I came straight out of the mine tunnel to the mine dump,
the trestle would be too short for the size of the mine,
and also the tailings pile would be too small.

I also had the mainline trestle to worry about,
so that the tailings wouldn't crash into the mainline trestle.
The management of the railroad wouldn't like that too much.
So I decided to curve the mine dump trestle so I could have larger tailings piles,
and build retaining walls to keep the tailings away from the main trestle.

No railings on the mine trestle yet.
The trestle will look like is it is slowly being overcome by the tailings.
I tell you the Sculptamold is a blessing since it can be easily cut and added to,
which is what I had to do to fit in the mine trestle.





A better view of the retaining walls keeping it away from the mainline trestle.
There will be a building containing the blacksmith shop and storage as on the prototype.















And still no clouds.

I will post more on the new section in about a week or so.

Happy modeling!

Kevin


W C Greene
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Howdy Kevin, such wonderful work!
Please keep us fascinated with new photos.

I built HOn3 for many years,
but couldn't approach anything like what you have done.
Thank you for showing us your layout,
it is indeed something special.

Woodie


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Kevin

A quick sketch of the switch stand,
hope you find it of value.

Liked the progress photo of the mine.










Kevin Fall
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Dang it Ken, 1/2" offsets on the horizontal bar in HO scale!
That would be an accomplishment.
I think I'll leave that part up to the imagination.

This should be a challenge for my eyes!
It looks from the photo as though the feet are splayed at the bottom of the stand,
and that was bolted to the bottom two U pieces, correct?

Thanks for the drawing,
this looks like a winter project out of brass or styrene.
Cutting out the curved piece at the top is the real challenge.


And thanks Tom and Woodie.

When I get to building some structures, that will bring things more to life,
as I have been watching both of your forums for structure weathering ideas,
as I haven't done any of that in probably 20 years.

The big stamp mill is this winter's major project, to bring it out of mockup land.
 
I never thought I would enjoy hand laying track and put it off for many years,
but I kind of had no choice with the double crossing near the mine,
so I figured I might as well go with it and it really went faster than I thought,
especially building switches.


Happy modeling!

Kevin


Ken C
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Kevin

The side's of the switch were made from a single length of 1/2 Inch by 2 Inch bar,
with the two 90 degree bends for the feet, they were spiked into the ties.

Not sure if the leg's were somewhat splayed out at the bottom,
or this happened when being salvaged.

Have seen straight sided stands at one of the mines in the area.

There are two 1/2 inch by 2 x 3 inch spacer's mounted between the horizontal bars,
I forgot to add to the sketch.


Si.
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Hi Kevin  :wave:



Wonderful little scene & great detailing !  :thumb:

Miniature mining never looked so good !!  :)


I must try & get around to a DIY switchstand BASH myself sometime.  :time:





Thanks for sharing your photos & sketches Ken.  :cool:


Keep up the good Gilpin work Kevin.  :mex:



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.


elminero67
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That is some fine modeling!

Kevin Fall
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Greetings,

Here is the latest update on my layout progress.


This view is from after the high trestle,
to what will be my medium sized town on the layout and the end of track.

All of the track has been laid and I am in the process of wiring.
Wiring is entirely new to me but with some help from friends I am plugging along.
All of the the track feeds have been attached and are being tested on the track switch by switch.
So far so good.

There is a retaining wall on the right and the river is far below the cliff.
Not landscaped until the track wiring is all complete.





Getting closer to the town the spur on the left will service a mine.
Another mine is up higher on the mountain to the left and will be serviced by a road from the town.
In the foreground the railroad will go over the road with a combination strain truss bridge.





Now we are coming into town.

I cannot take credit for Perkins Produce.
It was built by the late Earl Smallshaw,
and the subject of a Model Railroader article back in December 1974.
A manufacturer eventually made this into an HO kit.

I first saw this building on Earl's layout over 47 years ago when I was in high school,
and it was my favorite building for the way it was built into the hill.
I was fortunate that Earl's family let me have some of his buildings,
and this one is very special to me.
A few things need minor repair but overall it is in great shape.

There is a small yard below town,
and the main road to the town goes to the right of the building and up the hill.

Oh, and the colored balls are where my track feeders are attached,
so I will remember to connect them below the tabletop before I remove them.





You can better see here that the town will be above the railroad yard up on the hill.
I have placed cardboard cutouts of where I think the buildings will be.





Looking back you can see from where the railroad came from the high trestle, along the cliff and into town.





Another view. 
Note the two trestles in the background to get a better idea of where we came from.





Next an overall view of the yard from a balloon that was flying overhead yesterday.
You can better see where the town buildings will be.





Two of the four stub switches in the yard.
Switchstands are not attached to the switches yet.

I don't know if they will be operable,
but there will at least be a connection to the bridle bar.





A closer look at the stub switch and the retaining wall.
There will be an ice house and a town coal house above the retaining wall.





Another look at the wall and yard.  Track will need to be painted.  You can see some of the wires.





A view from the yard to the small town built on the hill above.

A small service road will go up the hill to the mine above the town.
Not every one can be serviced by a railroad!

Three homes will be on the right and the stone retaining wall will continue to the left,
getting smaller as it goes down the hill.
A few smaller worker homes may be on the hill behind the town buildings.

You can see part of "Knife Mountain" in the background!

One tail end of the wye will go into a tunnel,
to give the impression that the railroad continues further on.





This view is from the end of the wye track.
And a great view of the pole holding up my house!
I will use some tall pine trees to help disguise the pole, which will be painted blue to match the sky.

I will install some overhead directional LED lighting sometime this winter, for better lighting.

Control panel will be in the cutout on the front with all of the turnouts for this area.
As much as I would like to hand throw the switches,
reaching over all of the buildings would surely create a scale earthquake,
and the buildings in 1918 just didn't have the building codes we have today.





Thanks for looking.

Happy modeling!

Kevin


Si.
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Hi Kevin  :wave:


Awesome lookin' stub switches & stands ^^ ...  :thumb:

... & impressive vista !  :shocked:


How's things going on The Gilpin ?  L:


:cool:


Si.


Steven B
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Wow Kevin.

I certainly like the flow of your town,
it is very logical and the retaining walls seem to be part of the town,
not built to make the model. 

The shelf of your railroad looks "High Linish" from the Animas River,
and the approach reminds me of Silverton.

Great Job. 
Looking forward to more.

:2t:


Si.
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" I certainly like the flow of your town,
it is very logical and the retaining walls seem to be part of the town,
not built to make the model. "






Hi Kevin  :wave:


I agree with Steven.  :)

The town looks to be a great feature on the layout.


I like the way the 'wye' ^^ is kinda done in a clever 'space saving' way.  :thumb:


Seasons Greetings ... in snowy ? Colorado !


:java::moose: :dt:


Si.



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