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Steven B
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Hi all,

I have been a lurker for over a year, only commenting occasionally.  I have been inspired by so many of you here.  I am in the process of building a layout inspired by the Nevada Central.  I have been a fan for many years, and Mr. Ferrell's fairly recent book was the kick start.

I had a pretty respectable HO layout that was under construction, it too was based in Nevada around Wells, NV and the beginning of the paired track running on the SP/WP to the connection with the Nevada Northern and designed for operations.  But... my wife decided it was time to move near her mother... 2500 miles east.  So down came the layout and I tried to find people in the area who play trains.  Seems that the closest that I can find are an hour or better in any direction.  Hmmm, looks like I am basically YOYO (yer on yer own) for the most part.  There are those who will visit, but construction has to be downsized.  So I upsized to On30.

When I was a child my parents took me to Virginia City, NV and I fell in love with wood burning, ballon stacked American locomotives and drew them constantly with my crayons.  So, On30 represents a regression to my childhood. :bg:  I am all the happier for it.  HO was too small to do this, the locos could hardly pull themselves, so in the words of Goldilocks, "On30 is juuust right."  The NC burned coal, so there there won't be many ballon stacks, ok two.  I refuse to be constricted by history this time and am going freelance with a prototype base.  Meaning that I want to model certain equipment like Carter Bros. and Billmeyer Small, but realize that NOTHING was On30 and that the NC didn't really do anything for operations, so I am mixing it up.  I will model places that may or may not have existed as well as places that were never even close to the NC.  Some of these being Mono Mills on the Bodie Railway,  Brown's Canyon Trestle in the NPC, Ledlie, NV which will have a dock for the "Reese River Navigation Company" (a 1940s lie and pretty funny story - look it up) and Ophir (for my son a huge Goose fan), CO.  Now there was an Ophir on the east side of the Toiyabe's just south east of Austin, true story, think I full of it? (Work speak for "no lie"), so that is where it will be.
Anyway, that is why it will be called the Humboldt & Toiyabe.

The layout will eventually be housed in what I call "Eastern Nevada" a 12x28 shed, and will be double decked.  I have yet to run electricity to it and get all of the stored stuff out of it.  We bought an old farmhouse for my wife and the house is a priority.  Once that is done, Katy bar the door.

In the meantime, I can't sit on my hands.  I have begun work on items for the layout and I hope that this forum will document what I am doing, like so many other great inspirations that I have have been given on this forum.

I have been having problems posting photos.  It seems that my files are too big! So I may have to adjust the camera and try again.  Just tried again with the same error message, so I'll get it.  But I wanted to get started, so, here we go! 
Enjoy the ride... "Tickets Please." :pop:


Steven B
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Here we try again to upload a photo or two as an experiment.
If it works, then I'll talk about it.





Steven B
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Jumpin' Jehosephat!  It worked!  Dang, just like downtown. :shocked: Only issue was that I tried to post two at once.... only one shows.  No worries, I can make more posts if that is what it takes.
So, this is a Deerfield River Laser kit that I picked up to play with.  My goal is to replicate a car similar to the Monterey & Salinas Valley Combine in the California State Railroad Museum.  This one comes closest, without a complete scratch build which I will do someday, but it has nine windows and some frilly engraving to give it a bit of glam.  The prototype saw service not he NC for most of its life and was rebuilt to a seven window car later.  I got half way into the kit and decided that I could do it differently, so I'll get another and do it the way that I think I should have from the start.
Not sure what I will do with this one, but the kit and instructions were great.  It went together easily and smoothly.  It fit right over the Bachamnn frame without a hitch.  I added some seats from another car because it was short in the seating section.
In the next one, I will completely redo the interior with Grandt Seats some people and a little freight.  But I am so happy that I could make the photos load.  I have other things to post, but they will have to wait until I get a little time to retake pictures of them at a smaller format.  Yippee skippy we're on our way . :glad:

Herb Kephart
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Congratulations,  Steven!!

With all the different combinations of Server, IP, browser--etc, it's a magical that anything works anymore.

"Fix it again, it still works"


Herb, Head Luddite

Steven B
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No kidding Herb!  I have stuff lined up for pictures.  If I get a day where the wind doesn't blow everything down the hill, I'll get some images up... one at a time!

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Hi Steven :wave:


Lookin' good !


It should be possible for you to 'resize' your existing photos, using software.


For example, I believe you can do this with Microsoft 'Paint' which comes as standard with most versions of Windows.


If 'resized' to 800x--- ( looks like you are 4:3 ratio on the coach photo, so 800x600 ) which we recommend ...


... the photo SHOULD then be under 0.5 MegaBytes in size & can be Posted on Freerails.


It's worth figuring out the 'resizing' thing, since only 1 lot of hi-rez photos need be taken.


All the best.


:moose:


Si.

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As might be said at NASA, "You are cleared to go YOYO."
Equipment from that era makes for good looking trains when well kept.

Bill U
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Steve B where are you located? After 10 years in Nevada we retired to our beach house in Ocean View Delaware in 2014. I chased the NG railroads and early SG all over Nevada and eastern California during those 10 years so I know what you are up to. There are more model railroaders and On3ers in the area than you think.

Bill Uffelman

Steven B
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Thanks Si, I dunno, the mosheens are furrin to me.  I tried to figure this out a year ago, and it has been killing me to get this up and running.  I see so many great modelers here, this is a great forum.  :bow:
Bytes bite.  I'm like Herb, I am lucky I can just get on line somedays.  I use a MAC so I don't have Paint.  But there has to be sumpthin on this thing that does it.  I found that if I made my camera take small low res images I could do it.  That made my day.  I know on my old MS machine I could compress, I tried it here and it was still too big. I'm not a fast learner, not a slow learner, kind of half fast. :slow:
I just have to play with it and eventually I'll just keep pushing buttons until it works or breaks!  Thanks, and I'll see what I can find.  Maybe I'll get some sun tomorrow with a slow enough wind speed that I won't have to pick my models up in Richmond when I try to photograph them. :f:

Steven B
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Forrest, that was my thought too.  Short trains too!  Make layouts look bigger!

Steven B
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Hi Bill, I have met a few and we get together occasionally.  Each is about an hour from here.  I live in the Blue Ridge about an hour east of Roanoke.  Speaking of which we have a meet the first Saturday in April.  It's called the Great Eastern Divide.  I'm about the only western guy there!
I work summers, well April-December and am dying to get to some of the other NG meets that I have heard of, as well as getting to places like Timonium or Amherst.  
There are some great explorations out there in NV and Eastern CA.  I've had a love of mining and railroads forever.  I hope to really interpret the operations of such places in my models.  Industrial archeology I guess.

Steven B
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Hi All-
The weather has not cooperated very well, but I managed to get a few pictures of one of my projects.  This was last year's big project.  I have been disposing of my HO fleet and I needed to DO SOMETHING to get the creative juices flowing.  So I found these wall kits on eBay and picked up one that looked something like I would find in 1880s Nevada.  Because I can't leave well enough alone, I modified the walls and added an awning based on ones that I have seen in restored California Gold Rush Towns.  So what should it be? L:

Like Doug in Updah Creek, I had some fellas who are hard working miners and to tell the truth, they don't like looking' too rough.  So some quick research yielded Austin Baths. Now this establishment shared a building as close as I can figure and changed owners and locations a few times, but it lasted a good 20 years, from the ads in the Reese River Reveille.  So the Austin Baths and Hair Saloon (can't have enough saloons in a silver town!) was born.;)

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Steven B
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The Austin Baths advertised "steam and water baths".  I hand lettered the doors in keeping with the period tradition.:cool:

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Steven B
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Now why'd it do that?  I guess you gotta walk in sideways, maybe be a little sideways to let Floyd shave you?

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Steven B
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Did up the interior too.  Found some nice details from Berkshire Valley, and some cheap stuff on eBay.  Searched high and low, not so high and sober for a barbers chair, love the one in Updah, but I ended up just putting a smock on Freddie while he got his cut.:us:

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Steven B
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You can see the steam room and the bath tub... after all both "steam and water baths" are advertised.  I added a curtain to give a feller in the tub some privacy.  I haven't put the chimneys for the stoves on yet, 'cause they'll just get broken before the layout is built.:!:
Not that I have had that happen before or anything.  The roof is shingles from Builders in Scale.  I also put an sm LED in it to give it a glow at night.  One of my buddies said, "Nobody can see in there anyway. " I replied, "But I know what's in there.":)


That's what we got for today.  My next project, the one on the bench now is coming along great and I hope to start writing about it soon.

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Bill U
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Very nice!

Bill Uffelman

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Very nicely done Steven. The interior is very well conceived with the spittoon and the smock on the customer and some day I must try your brick, stone and plaster exterior style. On NGRM Online (and sometimes on here), Daniel Caso gives a regular master-class in scribing foam material with the buildings he produces and it would be interesting to hear how you went about getting your excellent result.

Steven B
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Thank you guys, I appreciate your comments.  Doug, I didn't carve this building.  The walls came from a fellow who offers kits in California.  You can find him on eBay.  This was his "Assay Office."  I decided to diverge because I lacked a brick chimney for the actual "assay" process. ???
However, I did, change the side walls and rear corners to "interlock" them.  I felt that if I had assembled the kit as designed, the walls would fall down.  So I brought in some stone masons and they rebuilt the building using some more bricks and stone.;)
All I did was fill in some of the block lines with plaster and "recarve" rock into the sides.  I did the same on the rear corners to make corners that interlocked.  I changed the capstones to brick as well, I didn't want the facade and dental cornicing falling on someone if the door slammed shut!  I did this with a metal ruler and a dental pick, slowly scribing the bricks to try and match the size of the dental cornicing on the front.  It was tough going trying to hold everything while doing this and there are irregularities
I had some chips when I did this and have since learned that :!:I can get it a little wet and it goes easier.  The chips didn't bother me too much because the building is supposed to represent a building built 20 years or so earlier.  The railroad was a late arrival in my world.  In future projects, not that I know how get images up on this site, I hope to document the steps a little better.  I like how you have done that, Doug, and that was the impetus for me to try and do the same.
Thank you again!

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Thanks for the very clear explanation Steven and your "adaptations" have certainly worked well. I use Flickr to host all my photos and it's a doddle getting them into the posts. I just

select the photo
select the share (bent arrow) symbol
select BBCode and then size (I choose Medium 800 x 600 or thereabouts) from the drop down box below
copy the code on the blue box and
paste that into the post.

Simples!

Last edited on Tue Feb 21st, 2017 06:01 pm by slateworks

Steven B
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Thanks Doug, I have to say, I am a Luddite and really have problems with this here computer crap.  :bang:   Not my cuppa tea.  I am lucky somedays just to sign on.  Here is a try at this flickr stuff.  I'm not seeing all the neat stuff that you outline.  If this works, then we'll talk about it.  If it doesn't then I'll save it for the one photo posts.  Here goes nuthin'.

33002246846_fb79d51e89_b.jpg
33002324066_b9e9b74e41_b.jpg32228844693_571d0c0144_b.jpg33043916115_afd593cfed_b.jpg

Steven B
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Ok so that was a bust.  I'll do it the hard way later.  grrrr:f:

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Hi Steven


The 'sideways' picture attachment is actually fine

Sometimes 'smart' phone type cameras dont know which way up they are

So images can appear sideways

You often see it online since 'smart' phones were invented


I'm sticking with my DynaTAC !


:f:


Eddie

W C Greene
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I wish that I knew or help out with posting photos. I use the Freerails gallery here and it works every time, except when MicroS$%%T "updates" some computer crap that goofs with my program...but I digress. I don't know a thing about smart phones, I phones, pole phones or any other doo dad like that but my po' old laptop gets me to the gallery and if I have the photo(s) on my desktop, it will send them to the gallery, thence to any posts. One click without any http//234567$%^^&.com BS. I encourage all to try the gallery, it beats the hell outta Photobucket and the others.

Woodie-Luddite DeLuxe

Steven B
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Well, thank you Woodie.













Oh My!  Look it worked!  :glad:
Whatever shall I do?!!!  So, now I can do this the easy way.  :shocked:
So this is my latest project.  I am building a tent saloon for a camp.  Placer gold was being discovered in many places, in what would many call a "late" timeframe.  Most people associate placer or free gold with the California Gold Rush, where miners panned and used water to wash the gold from the sands and gravels of stream beds and ancient rivers.

Nevada was no different.  The Comstock was actually discovered by the Grolsch (think I spelled that right... probably not, I am too lazy to look it up) brothers in 1859, about the same time they were panning Clear Creek in Colorado.  Manhattan, NV was also a large placer operation as was Oseola, NV among others.  My story is this, while the railroad was building up the Toiyabes in 1881, the grade builders unearthed a large sand bar loaded with free gold on Big Creek and a rush began.  While there were mines up in this area, they didn't last long and were most likely prospects, but in my world, the area exploded.

Tent towns were built throughout the "wild west" mining days of Nevada all the way up into the 1920 at Leadfield outside of Death Valley.  Places like Rawhide, Manhattan and others began as tent towns, mostly centered around a few merchants and of course as many saloons as could be mustered.   You can search UNR archives on line and many tents pop up, and many tent saloons are the subject matter.

The Star Spangled Banner is a hat tip to some friends of mine from back in my historic interpretive days.  But, in the photos that I found, there were many saloons and businesses that just painted their signs right on the canvas.
I was sitting in a pizza restaurant one night during the time that I was envisioning this project and we were given napkins by the waitress, and BAM! these were perfect for O Scale heavy canvas :thumb:, so I asked for a couple of more... she obliged.  I left a big tip!  I commenced to build the floor and framework out of styrene, distressing it and using a myriad of acrylic colors to make the "wood" feel like wood.  I cut and wrapped my new found canvas on the structure and painted it a thinned "sand".  I use thread for the ropes and gave the whole thing a wash of very thinned black.  

It is the Star Spangled Banner, so my story is Antone is the owner and keep, came 'round the horn in '50 to try his luck in the mines.  He struck out as a miner, but was able to get a job at a restaurant in Sacramento.  He quickly became the head cook, and there was a rumor, which he refuses to confirm or deny that he used to work in DelMonico's.  Never-the-Less, he was successful enough to open his own restaurant and made a small pile.  His partner, Carson, tried to talk him into going to San Francisco, this was about the time of the Washoe excitement, and he opted for adventure instead.  Packed up his pots and pans, and his beloved bar and back bar (also shipped 'round the horn in '57) and headed off.  

Washoe was just what he wanted and just about the time things got routine, he lit out for White Pine and ran a place on Treasure Hill.  When that petered out he headed to Austin and worked there for a time, always restless.  Then... Big Creek just over yonder, exploded, being so close, he was about the first on scene.  The SSB is his latest.  Always loving the American dream and being able to be as successful as he was willing to work, he fostered a deep love of American History and has collected a number of prints of historical note.  One, his favorite, being the copy of Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze (1851), the second is one of General Grant (before all the messiness of President Grant). He also has collected some copies of some "traditional" saloon art for his patrons who demand it.  You will notice that President Garfield is dropped in black crepe.  It is late September, and he has just been assassinated.  Antone is deep mourning, he liked Garfield's policies and doesn't feel that Chester Arthur is up to the task.  "We shall see," he says.

Here we are at the beginning of this project.  Antone has plans to build an addition for cooking food.  Right now he is serving up pork, beans and biscuits as that is all he has time to cook with building the establishment.
More to come!  Thanks Woodie for getting me into the Gallery.  It was a tough find!:cool:


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First the bar.  The bar is a little more elegant than many pictured in tent saloons.  I built it piece by piece basing it loosely on one that I used to sling beers on in Columbia, California. While many bars did not have a brass foot rail, this came "'round the Horn."

This is the bar I scratch built it from Evergreen.  I found it easy to bend the thin parts.  I would glue one side, let it dry and then glue it to the other side, like a veneer and then over laid it with trim.  I did the rail the same way.


You can see the construction on the bottom that I did not paint.


I built it to detail the back, but I am not sure that I will do that, nobody will be able to see it... not even a little bit.

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The back bar I wanted to be ornate.  I had a couple of greco-roman columns from my HO days that have been languishing in a parts box.  There was this very nice back bar in Sonora, California that I thought might be black walnut.  It was DARK.  And... it had two columns.  There you go...



The base was two el cheapo parts from 1/48 dollhouse set.  I think they were supposed to be side boards. I filed one side of each and glued them together.  Bammo, now I needed a mirror.  I liked Doug's mirror in his barbershop so I ordered up some "BareMetal" Chrome and cut it to fit, finished out the top and there you have it, a back bar.  I added a beer barrel with a tap.  
Keep in mind this is "steam" beer.  Your history lesson - Steam beer is a western tradition.  and is basically a lager style of beer, that is brewed and stored in "warm" conditions.  "Lager" means "to store."  Lagers were stored in cool to cold places in the east and Germany.  This was a challenge in the west.  So it was brewed like a lager but was much more excitable because of the temperature.  There is no real reason that can be found as to why it was called "steam beer" except that it developed a better head due to the temperature situation.  It had a pressure like steam.  When tapped the tap was driven into the keg with a hammer.  For the uninitiated who stayed at the bar, they could get a dousing of suds.  Lo the bar keep who missed!  Steam Beer was killed by the 18th Amendment.  Today there is only one "Steam Beer" as the name was trademarked by a San Francisco brewer.  However!  We brewed a "western" beer on numerous occasions.  It was bottled and lacked the excitement of a wooden keg.



Antone, loves his bar and back bar.


More later as I progress.  Thanks for looking!

slateworks
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Good stuff Steven. Now you want lots of bright coloured liquor bottles to go with the barrel. I see the bar-keep's already found one.

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Very nice! That's a real saloon you are building.

Woodie

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Don't forget the shotgun under the counter...
Jose.

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Steam beer, I learned yet another new thing here! :)

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Thanks Guys!  Yes, I've researched a few saloons. ;)   I have some bottles from Stewart Dollhouses.  I will be working them up.  And, yes Jose... I have a scatter gun!:cb:  Thank you very much, I'm working up some more stuff and hope to have more in the next few days.  This posting is fun!

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Steven B wrote:  

Oh My!  Look it worked!  :glad:


GREAT work, how'd you do the seams in the 'canvas'? Did you just alow for the paint to dry to harden and make the shape hold?
I would love to make a few WW2 'wall' tents, using you methods!

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Hi Lee, I think WWII walls would be a bit easier on the framework.  It was easy, sewing 1A, but with CA not thread.  I figured out what size I wanted and I sketched a pattern basically like the one below.  I cut out the pattern and lightly traced it on the napkin material.  I cut the ends out of the material that I used with a razor blade.  I then measured the length of the middle (roof and walls), cut it out.

I folded the roof & walls in half for the ridge, then folded it again to create the walls.  Then I folded the "tabs" on the front and back to 90 degrees and CAed the tabs to the wall and roof sections accordingly.  Bango, you've got the wall tent.  You can then wash it OD to make it military.  Easy peasy.  Obviously with your other hobby you are familiar with the framing of a wall tent.  Good to go.  If you need further clarification, just ask.
 

Attachment: IMG_1583.JPG (Downloaded 117 times)

Steven B
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Antone has been busy.  Had a freighter come up from Austin and brought a load of refreshments, Champagne, Kentucky Bourbon, Sazarac, and more beer.  There were even seegars!  :mex:


The bar was stocked, a pail of wash water brought in, a clean towel and extra cases of Sarsaparilla and Champagne were stowed underneath.  And yes, Jose, there is a piece ready for come what may.


I didn't fill the shelves, I would have put glasses there, but there is no way anyone could see them.  They would be an invisible version of Lee's corn...$$$$.




Open for business!

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Steven B wrote:





























They would be an invisible version of Lee's corn...$$$$.





I'm sure the Ensor ladies over at the corn field on my layout would be just fine with some of the product of their Victory garden being transported back in time for such a use. My layout takes place where there were a lot of moonshiners, so they can appreciate good, "corn squeezins'" as well as the residents of your layout!

That is amazing work. I'd award you a veritable herd of moose for that, but somehow I'm having problems adding emoticons to my posts, in any of the board themes...
By the way, where did the bottles come from? They look amazing!





Last edited on Fri Feb 24th, 2017 11:46 pm by Lee B

slateworks
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Great stuff Steve. it's looking real user friendly now.

pipopak
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Congrats!. Great model!
Jose.

Steven B
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Thank you very much guys. 
Lee, the bottles come from two sources, the first is like your cornfield and are 3D printed, this also gave us the beer mugs and glasses.  It is called Stewart Dollhouse Creations, they are on the web.  The second, where the barrels and boxes also came from is Black Dog, a military modelers source.  I have bought these off eBay and they are 1/48.  For most of the bottles I searched out labels from my many years of saloon research and used authentic labels, some are too big, but printing them any smaller would make them blobs on paper.  The Stewart bottles some with some labels if you don't want to search.  But it used to be my job to find this stuff and recreate 1:1 scale.
So let's get this thing started, some of the locals are just getting in and are finding the selection rather nice.


Let's take a look inside, shall we?



Looks like business is picking up.  Antone's wife, Juanita, is helping out with the clientele.

Steven B
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William McIntosh, has come in to camp to buy some flour and other needed provisions for he and Patty Karnahan working their claim on Big Creek.  He stopped in to have a small draught and ran into Johan "Slim" Chance.  Slim is about the tallest feller in camp and skinny as a bean pole, but he likes his beer after washing gravel all day.  Antone is putting up a new stock of Kentucky Bourbon just in from the Transcontinental railway.

Elliot and the boys have taken up a game of cards to while away the afternoon.  Being up this high the sun can be very brutal and the mid afternoon can wear a man down, so many wait until a little later to resume work, when the steep canyon starts to shade the diggin's again.  Elliot is a bit of a cheat, his partners aren't quite yet aware of this.  I didn't model a regular saloon game because space was tight.  I have a larger more permanent building that I will interpret the leased space games like Pharo or Monte.

Charlie Wilson has just come into the saloon for supper, he took a cup of coffee, and has asked Juanita for a shot of something a bit stronger.  Jack Moore never bothered to wash a pan today.  He had a very good day yesterday and has been in the saloon since last night, he is barely on his feet now, and is quite nearly falling down.

Being at nearly 7000', as warm as it is during the day, it gets pretty chilly at night, and Antone brought his stove.  He remembers well the nights on Treasure Hill in White Pine, and swore that he would never be without heat again.  He sewed wool strips around the hole in the tent for the stove pipe to keep it from catching fire.  As much as he likes the camps, he knows that fire can be the death of them, so he fashioned a sandbox underneath the stove to catch cinders too.  That's all from Big Creek for now.  The next wagon hopefully will bring Antone's lamps that he ordered.  The candles scare him, especially when Jack gets in his cups.

Steven B
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You light up my life...

While we haven't filled the reservoirs or trimmed the wicks, we got the lights hung!  I am using SMD LEDs that are yellow to stave off the "blue" or "incandescent" glow.  I know that this isn't my idea, I saw this somewhere and have spent the last 1/2 hour looking for where I got the idea.  Might have been Doug's but I can't seem to find it.  I want to give credit where credit is due, so if anyone knows where this came from, please post and take the credit.
How did I build mine, I started with the following: 0.12 brass wire, a couple of jewelry beads from a local craft store, an SMD LED, and earring back, and a couple of drills.

Next I enlarged the hole in the earring back with a drill bit, then took a rat tail file to it until it fit the conical plastic bead, so that the bead just struck through, then I drilled two #76 holes across from each other on the earring back.




Then I glued the conical bead to the hole.

In the other little silver bead, I drilled two #80 holes across from each other. I then bent some of the 0.12 wire around a fatter paintbrush.



Here glued the ends of two pieces of 0.12 wire into those holes, keep the wire somewhat long.  I used two pieces of long wire. 

I fed the LED through the fat end of the conical bead, DON'T pull too hard, don't ask me why, but there were at least 3 choice words chains used!  Then feed the two 0.12 wires through the holes on the sides.



Get the wires centered, I didn't push the chimney all the way down thinking that maybe I'll get more light that way.  The gap is about 1/32.  The bring the brass wires together and twist a couple of times.  Secure the shade and twist with a little CA.  I left a tail on one of the brass wires to hang the lamp.  I will run the electrical wires over the ridge and down behind the bar when I next get time to work on it.  Baddabing! Kerosene lights.

slateworks
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Super lamps Steve. I like the use of jewellery beads. I used them for the lit globes in Updah's gas station pumps.

W C Greene
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Yes, really nice lamps! Ahhh, the jewelry section at the local "craft" store...That's where my links & pins are found for my couplers. And phone pole insulators, and power line insulators, and......so on. It pays to look everywhere you go, I have even found "details" at the grocery store.

Woodie
Again, the lamps are great, I will purloin your methods also.

Reg H
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W C Greene wrote: Yes, really nice lamps! Ahhh, the jewelry section at the local "craft" store...That's where my links & pins are found for my couplers. And phone pole insulators, and power line insulators, and......so on. It pays to look everywhere you go, I have even found "details" at the grocery store.

Woodie
Again, the lamps are great, I will purloin your methods also.

I once was complimented by a nice lady that it was considerate of me to accompany my wife to the craft store.
Hunh?
Reg

Lee B
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Steven B wrote: Lee, the bottles come from two sources, the first is like your cornfield and are 3D printed, this also gave us the beer mugs and glasses.  It is called Stewart Dollhouse Creations, they are on the web.  The second, where the barrels and boxes also came from is Black Dog, a military modelers source.






Thanks, Steven! I just looked up the first
website and they do have a lot of stuff. The bottles aren’t cheap but it’s
something hardly anyone models. I’d love to scatter a few ‘empties’ around the
layout, for people to find.




As for my cornfield, that isn’t 3D printed.
They’re individual stalks, made from wire, plastic and paper (I think) by JTT
Scenics: http://www.jttmicroscale.com/viewcategory.asp?DirID=162 I bought a
pack of them every time I was at the (somewhat) local hobby shop and/or Hobby
Lobby, stockpiling them over time. There are just about exactly 400 of them in
that field, each one hand-placed in tight rows.

Steven B
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Thanks guys.  This has been fun.  And I am no where near done.  But my time is running short before I have to go back to work.  I have to pay for this hobby somehow.
My wife accompanied me to the craft store.  I think she is my ticket to get in.  There is some kind of secret handshake or something, I certainly know how she feels when she goes to the train store!
Lee, 400 stalks!  See what I mean about bottles.... bottles - corn all very expensive, but very cool details.  This was why I had to put lighting in this thing.  :)  Be sure to through a few of those bottles down the outhouse!  Maybe in a few years we can dig 'em up and make some money :bg: to pay for them.
I knew that I had seen the idea somewhere Doug, thank you.
I hope to work quite a bit more next week.  I am trying to finish it for the "Great Divide Meet" in Roanoke in April.
Steve

Steven B
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I've been back to work for a while now.  I don't get to model much if at all.  It was 69 days before I got my first few hours off... whew.  But, I read all of the new posts and model vicariously through y'all.

I was looking through some photos and found some that I thought would make a great story and allow me to share some of my work done last year... This is the story of Reuel C. Gridley and the Sanitary Sack of Flour.



Reuel was chronicled by none other than the fabulous Mark Twain in Roughing It.  You see Mr. Gridley ran for mayor of Austin, Nevada in 1864.  Mr. Gridley, a resident of "Upper" Austin, was the Democratic candidate and he made a bet with the Republican candidate that the looser would carry a 50 pound sack of flour from one residence to the other.  Mr. Gridely lost the election (and the bet) and thus was to carry the sack.
To much fanfare, a band to accompany him, and a lively crowd, Mr. Gridley set off with the sack of flour on his shoulder.  When he had reached his destination he made the decision to auction it off as a benefit to the United States Sanitary Commission.  This was a forerunner of the American Red Cross during the American Civil War.  So with quite rowdy bidding the bag fetched a resounding $250!  When asked where the man who won it wanted it delivered, he cried, "Auction it again!"  The crowd grew and grew, fueled by drink and the excitement of the moment.  And, so the lowly sack was auctioned over and over 300 times until the bag had raised over $8000 and the sun had set.:rah:


The Gridley store still stands and it will be modeled eventually.
When word reached Virginia City, he was invited to sell it there.  When he arrived and the auction ended, the metropolis was humiliated, raising a mere $5,000, much less than the dramatically smaller city of Austin.  A call went out and the auction resumed the next day in Gold Hill down the road from Virginia.  When the first bid came in the morning, the Yellow Jacket Mine opened with a $1000 bid.  By the time everything was done and Virginia finally got back into the picture $40,000 dollars had been raised.  Twain claims this was about $3 for every man, woman and child in the Comstock.:2t:

Gridley was asked to tour California and the rest of the United States.  He ended up raising over $275,000, a massive sum in that era.  When he returned to Austin, his business was in ruins and he was ill.  He and his family moved to Stockton, California nearly penniless.  When it was found that he was destitute, $1400 was raised to buy him a small house and a small farm.  He died in 1871 and is buried today in Stockton.  In this day of division, I thought that I would share the story of Reuel to show that politics can, if allowed, be good natured and come to a classy resolution.  ;) 
I model a time 10 years after the passing of Mr. Gridley, but... who am I to stand in the way of a good story?  I mentioned on another forum about how I modified my western fighters by removing their guns and employing them in more peaceful pursuits.  This was the example that I found.  This fellow was carrying a shotgun and a hog leg on his hip, I removed all of them, repositioned his arm and added a sack.



The photo at the beginning shows Mr. Gridley in dark trousers, but I wanted him to be a little more vibrant so I gave him some plaid trousers.  The figure also got a beard, the fighter did not have one.  I then painted him to be my version of Mr. Gridley.  I am looking forward to getting him a store someday soon.  I think that I have some fellows for a band and I know that I have people to cheer him on.

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Hi Steven :wave:

Great stuff as usual !

:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:

Si.


Steven B
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Thanks Si, you are quite generous with moosies!  I have more but I have to search photos in my down time.  If time allows I'll get some more cool stuff up this week.

Steven B
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Well I got home for a couple of hours today.  Not for great reasons, had a broken pipe in the bathroom. Argh... fortunately insurance will ease the pain.

Delays in getting the house done for the CFO have necessitated the storage of household items in "Eastern" Nevada.  The broken pipe just pushes out "ground breaking" on the H&T Rwy.  :time: But the CFO must have her house before the railroad can be brought to fruition (the stuff stored out in Nevada awaits... and the RR waits).  We are working on a 1940 farmhouse and it has had its challenges for certain, the broken pipe moving up the bathroom remodel, and putting the dining room on hold.  Sigh.

At any rate there was advancement in the last month, the Rural Lectrikfrication Act got us lektrik out to our new railway house (thanks to a buddy).  Look at the beautiful conduit bringing 60 amps to our operation! :!: Of course now I have to wire, insulate, rock, light and hook up the panel.  Not to mention getting that STUFF that belongs in the house out of Nevada.  I think of those old wagon trains abandoning their stuff as they moved across the Great Basin... that's what my RR building has in it... abandoned stuff.  Looks like I need to weed whack too... sheesh all this extra stuff just to get 'em rolling.  It's a helluva way to run a railroad.

Steven B
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Hey everyone!  
I am finally back home!  I left my former employment (_!_) and that is what I think of that.

I have some time to model again, in between rebuilding the CFOs house and getting a late summer garden in.  I think everyone is happy.
I have been motivated to get a project off the ground.  I need a small project that can easily be moved.  


This image and another come from Railroad in the Sky by Wanda & Richard Canton through the Friends of Bodie Railway & Lumber Company.  I have loved the Mono Basin forever. Bodie is a part of that.  My lumbering portion of the layout will be based on the Bodie Railway & Lumber Company.
I am also a huge fan of the Jeffrey Pine.  For those unfamiliar, the Jeffrey is kin to the Ponderosa, grows pretty big and when the wind blows through them they waft a wonderful vanilla smell that you will never forget.  To tell a Jeffrey from a Ponderosa, put your nose in the bark and sniff!  The Jeffrey was the primary tree cut and milled by the BR&LC.  Through the help of the book and the FBR&LC I found Dan Kieft of Oregon who has made extensive drawings of the BR&LC equipment, facilities, and structures.  To him I am grateful and this project was his latest drawing.
The hardest part is modeling the chassis.  The photos of this caboose are vague and fuzzy at best.  It obviously had pedestal mounts for two axles and was spartan at best.  Aside from trying to adapt an HO scale bobber, I thought I might try to modify Grandt Line C&S pedestal mounts to fit.  
There were no springs on the cab like the GL mounts, so I omitted them and built a "block" and rubber cushion style system that were prevalent in the early days of railroading.  I did this by mounting strip styrene to the inside of the pedestal.  I then took a piece of styrene tube and cut it to fit.  It is a little tall, but I think it is acceptable.  The frame will also sit higher than the drawing, but I would like to use IMRC Semi-scale 36" wheels which will be about 18" and bring the car height down to what I think will be acceptable for the look.
While I am a rivet counter in recovery, the "look" and "flavor" are important to me.  


I don't know, but I think due to the lack of detailed pictures Mr. Kieft was vague with the under frame.  This allows me to "make it up" and use conjecture to build it the way that it will work for operations.


I will probably shave off the "C&S" casting marks as these were most likely cast by the Virginia & Truckee's Carson City shops.  This may not be visible anyway when I am done, but details sometimes matter.  As I build the frame I may find that the IMRC wheels don't work the way that I hope... this is a build and fit as I go project.L:
So much for now, it is sure good to be back.

Herb Kephart
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Steven

Under certain circumstances, telling the boss to "shove it" is the thing to do. Working under conditions that make you consider quitting is bad for the health and spirit.

Glad to see you are back. Do you know where Jeffery pine seedlings can be obtained? Haven't done an extensive search myself, and unless they grow about 3 foot a year I won't get to see them as mature trees, but the kids will. Might not be cold enough in Pennsylvania.

Model on!!!!!!!

Herb

W C Greene
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I was fortunate that the last job I would ever have (outside of stuff that I do for myself), I was able to tell the boss off and give him the "finger salute". And after all that, he wanted me to come back for "the holidays"! Whatta maroon!

On the hack's wheel pedestals...the old photos are fuzzy (and OK for modeling) and I don't believe that there are any folks alive who could pick nit the plan you have. Besides, pickers love to tell others what to do while they sit on their butts and don't (or won't) build anything.
Now, whar's that scale ruler...somewhere around here...
Woodie

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Welcome home, Steven:

I have had a couple of those jobs myself. 

It seems the real cure is to become the boss.  Not an option for everybody.  And it sure makes telling the boss to "stuff it" difficult.   :)

Your theme looks both intriguing and challenging.  

Reg

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Hey guys,  I don't know where Jeffreys can be obtained.  I imagine that they can be found on the inner tube.  Probably Amazon, they have everything.  I know that we planted a few when we lived out in CA.  We lived near Yosemite and they seemed to be doing ok, but that was years ago.  Yes, they like it cold and well drained Sierra soil.  Not sure if they could make it in PA.  But if you ever get out there to the east side, do make it a point to seek these out.  Late afternoon breeze is a plus.  I hear they built a kiosk at the old Mono Mill site just off US 395.  We used to camp there with the boys when there was nothing to mark it.  Found the turntable foundation and all kinds of cool stuff.  Even took pictures with us to locate the buildings.

I have been thinking of starting something of my own.  But I wonder if that would be akin to representing yourself in court.  "If you represent yourself, you have a fool for an attorney" kind of thing.  And truthfully, if I did do that, I think the boss would understand if I told him to take a flying leap.  :cool:  He is tough to work for and knows it.  But I am old enough now not to care and at this point becoming rich is a pipe dream.  I'll be happy with enough to finish the lady's house and build a layout while watching my fruit trees come in.  

Worked a bit on the under frame tonight and will post more photos when I get some real progress.  I am kind building it "from the hip."  Using typical car fabrication ideas and making changes to suit the photos to some degree.  So it is taking a bit of time to flesh it out.  The pedestals are really very tall, even with the HO 36" wheels.  I might have to put more than one step on the platform.  :f:  I'll play with it some more.  Thanks for watching!

Steven B
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So, after a tumultifying year, the shops in Ledlie are building again.  As posted in another forum, I need to hire me a Wolfie to get some of this work done.  It just ain't gettin' done by it sitting on the bench.  

I am working up the cab by laminating sheets of styrene together with the idea that I might detail and light the interior.  "Might" being the key word there...

This being the image of where we last left our heroes.  


This is the image of cutting out windows one hole at a time though each layer.  Pay no heed to the not so square openings.  We have ordered pre-hung windows. ;)  They should arrive soon and then I can fix the openings.  I left them a little small.  I was greatly relieved to find that Grandt Line #21 (I think that is the number) windows were a perfect fit for the drawings.  More to come as I go.

Reg H
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Steven:


I love working in styrene.  A lot can be done with an exacto knife, a straight edge, and a little bottle of MEK.   

Your crummy is looking good.

A little tool I have found very useful for "inside" cuts, like window and door openings, is a "nibbler".  This is a tool that is on the workbench of everyone who works with electronics chassis.  But it works great for styrene.

I got mine at Radio Shack.  Not an option anymore.  Micro Mark carries the variety I have, the manual one, which works just fine.  But I just noticed they have a power nibbler.  It is a bit pricey, but very tempting.

I just did considerable "nibbling" in sheet steel for a small project recently and my hand was pretty tuckered out by the time I got finished.  That power nibbler would have been mighty handy.

Reg


pipopak
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FWIW, nibblers are not designed to cut perfect 90 angles, just good enough.
Jose.

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pipopak wrote: FWIW, nibblers are not designed to cut perfect 90 angles, just good enough.
Jose.


With a little care, the nibbler can certainly cut 90 degree angles.  The window openings on this depot were cut with a nibbler. 
Reg

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Hmmmm.  Might be a little easier.  I used a square and a straight edge and still they weren't!  Now, after 20 minutes here and 20 minutes there, they are.  The windows arrived yesterday and I have the next three days off.  If the weather is as good as they say it will be, there is a very good chance my only chore will to be bring in firewood!  

Might have to retire to my lurkem and do some lurking around that cab.  I'll look up a nibbler.  Maybe I can find one that comes with cookies!  I still have to do the ends and doors.

More pitchurs by Monday.  Thanks!

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Got a few hours to work on the caboose today.  I cleaned up the sides and fitted the windows.  They are not glued in yet because I am building this by the seat of my pants. Meaning I don't know what I am doing until I do it.  I am using the plans and the two photos as my guide.  

When I got to the letter boards I was trying to figure out a radius and, golly, my knife handle was pretty close.  Good thing I have a few.  

I then cut the ends.  I found that I was too fargone lazy to build doors and I had a set of Grandt DR&G caboose doors.  They be the ones, looked great.  I cut out the four pane windows and making them single pane windows.  I used a compass to draw and cut the radius for the roof.  Started trimming it out, but got to the point where I was starting to stare at it.  Time to quit.  Found out a long time ago, don't try to do "that last little thing" before quitting.  I usually screw it up...  :doh:



Temp is dropping!  Snow flurries now!!  Come on climate change, do your thing... keep me from doing anything that looks like chores tomorrow.  Although there are those kitchen uppers that she keeps asking about (she got the parts for me today... gee thanks) and then there's that drywall work... Sigh.:y:

Last edited on Sun Dec 31st, 2017 07:25 am by Steven B

Michael M
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Steven,

Where did you find those pedestals?  Thinking they would be great in 1/35 scale.

Steven B
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Michael, They are Grandt Line C&S Caboose pedestals.  I built them without the leaf spring and modified them by taking out the "spring" and putting in a "rubber" shock absorber, as used on early trucks.  But otherwise it is right out of the kit.

Last edited on Sun Dec 31st, 2017 05:21 pm by Steven B

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Moving right along.  I have begun to paint this rig.  My hope is to recreate the look in the photos of this caboose.  But, maybe not too much as it is supposed to be fairly new.  The whole idea is to do a few "washes".  "EGADS!  Is he going to brush paint this thing?!"   Yup.  It is too cold to break out the airbrush, and truthfully I want a "stained" look.  So washes it will be.  I need to mention that I lightly distressed all of the styrene to give it a light wood grain.  I used a #11 knife and a wire brush.  I first washed with a Model Master Acryl Raw Sienna. The frame and deck are done.

Now I go for a darker but red color.  I supposed that the siding is fir. and it has a red tone to it.  I used a wash of Earth Red.  On the deck and frame I also went with some dark browns too.  Then I dry brushed a Panzer Interior (a yellowish white) to give it the "wood" look that I wanted.  If you ever looked at pictures of Bodie's wooden structures, that was the color/effect that I as shooting for on the frame and deck.

I also put some paint on the Grandt casting so that they might accept color a little better.  The hardest part of all of this is finding the ding dang patience to let it all dry and not wipe the previous color off.:f:  Don't ask me how I know.  Notice how dark the one side at the top is in the upper photo.
The photos of the prototype are black and white and there are only two known.  One is in winter and the other is in summer.  Best thing is that they are different sides.   So, the cab is a very light color and my first thought is paint it white.  But then I thought, I want a colorful railroad.  White won't cut it.  So I am opting for a light cream.  I am mixing a GLB Yellow with a Panzer Interior.



To quote an old Buck Owens song, "It's drying time again..."

Last edited on Tue Jan 2nd, 2018 02:43 am by Steven B

Steven B
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So I pulled out the Patented Impatient Car Dryer.:)  They are acrylics and dry fast.



Getting so far and waiting I looked at the photos.  the undercarriage is very dark.  Like, black dark, and I didn't like that.  The doors were also very dark.  Having worked with old photos in a past life, I knew that red could interpret dark.  And the snow being very white in one picture could be just enough contrast to make the color seem black.  I decided that since late photos (almost all photos of the BR&LCo were late, 1900 and on, photos) show the flats to be what appears to be a lead (boxcar) red with white letters.  This is also what the car at June Lake was painted, it was found out on the line.  I made a command decision, the underframe would be red.  I mixed a "lead" red and made sure that is had some blue in it, for dark interpretation.  And since the doors were dark too, so be it, the doors are red.


The unpainted white is raw plastic and is a glue edge for when I assemble the car.  But the doors kinda look nice in the red.  And with the last dry brush of "buff" the boards can sorta be seen and gives it the pre-peeling look that I was hoping for.  Remember winters and summers are tough at over 8,000' (2450m for you folks outside of the Great Basin area) in the desert.  So wood takes a licking, and keeps on shrinking.  I may hit it with some dullcote, even though the shine is probably correct, most folks can't make the model leap and think it looks "toylike".  Argh... "cute."  Next we go indoors.

Last edited on Tue Jan 2nd, 2018 05:01 am by Steven B

Si.
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Hi Steven :wave:



I'm pleased to hear the weather is really bad there for you ... ;)

... so you've got lots of time for modeling ! :)



Thanks for the step-by-step. :thumb:

It looks like the final layers of colour are pretty nice ! :bg:

Plus the RUST ! down bellow of course. :P



:cb:



Si.

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Really looking good.

Two observations...yeah that concept of quitting before trying to squeeze in that last little task is a great tip.  I adopted that more recently than I care to admit. I have screwed up a lot of project by trying to rush that one last step before dinner.


And...I like your approach of working things out as you go.  I used to try and plan out every step, only to find out that not infrequently a planned step simply would not work as planned. 

My recent plate girder project was tackled that way.  I simply started cutting, hacking and gluing things together until I got the result I wanted.  Projects don't always work out that way.  But a lot of times you just gotta figure things out as you go.

Regarding the second observation...I fell victim in a recent machine shop project.   I had 12 6-32 holes to tap, and it was getting close to bed time.

Wanting to get all 12 tapped before quitting for the evening I kinda hustled the tapping.  Until I broke the tap.  

All efforts to remove the broken tap have failed.

So I get to build that part all over again.

Reg

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Ugh!  I hate when that happens.  I had some time today and thought, "I know the prototype wasn't lettered (at least in the later 1910s and only two images), but the tenders of the locos were quite snazzy in the early days of 1881.  So why wouldn't they letter the caboose?!"

The flats had Roman Style lettering.  I thought, "I'll do some cool shadowing and keep it simple."  Yeah, right.  I was in a "rush" and the decals that I was trying to use were ANCIENT, read: falling apart.  I burned through all the spares and had a number of them set on the model... ugh!  I ended up scrubbing the good ones off as I didn't have enough to finish the project.  I'll do something later... maybe.  I'll have to buy more decals and I'm not a fan of shipping costs right now for a single sheet of decals.  I can always revisit that later, even after the model is completed structurally.

So, no, I didn't start the interior yet, but wasted a epoch of time on the project today.  Yes, Reg, there is a stopping point, recognizing them when they come along is the tough part.:bang:  No picts today because there is nothing to see here, move along.  

Well Si, it was warmer today, maybe that was the problem.  Oh, and then there was my real job, the one that makes the CFO happy.  Did I mention that she still wants me to finish the uppers in the kitchen?  I have to take the truck in for a new exhaust system (it finally gave up the ghost 330K miles later, not too bad really) so I guess that kitchen work will have to wait until the weekend?  Let me check the weather!;)

Steven B
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Opps!:f:

I drove the 2+ hours to Charlotte today for the WGH Trainshow and picked up some tools. So... I shoulda bought a coupler height gauge BEFORE I started assembly.  The B'Mann stuff uses HO height as the coupler platform.  BUT.... I am building a bunch o' stuff that is kitted for On3.  Or, in this case scratch building.  So I should have gotten the gauge first and built the platform to the gauge height.  But I was using the drawings and thinking, "This is cool," never taking into account operational awareness.  

Well it is a little low, or a little (quite a bit really) high in HO.  I cut and filed to make it work, hey after all Billmeyer & Small built their cars with a coupler through the end sill, so this is a gimme.


All betta. :2t: FMW link and pin couplers use a Kadee #5 HO box, so that is what I am going to use to mount them.  I am thinking this way so that I can change them out for knuckles when I have an op session with others who want to slam bam cars around.  No slam bam with link and pin, you need the patience to match Job.

In other news, the long a tedious building of the inside door and window frames is complete.  Did I mention that I am an HO rivet counter in recovery?  I sweat the details.  It is an illness, but I am getting better, this isn't On3... it is On30.  Right? :cool:  I don't even know if anyone will be able to see inside the car when I am done.  But I'll know the windows look right when looking out... what a kook.:Crazy:  Oh and I bought a new cutting mat.  The plywood was starting to splinter from all the little cuts.


Last edited on Mon Jan 15th, 2018 07:26 am by Steven B

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Alrighty!  Two .080 styrene pads glued to the floor under the coupler boxes.  The "box" trimmed of its wings (the screw holes) and glued to the pads.  New holes drilled and tapped into the pads, centering springs put in the boxes FMW link and pin couplers added and the lids screwed down.  Now... if I just had something to hook it up to!:bg:  That'll come next maybe.  Have to repaint the scratched up styrene from my modification, but I must say... done! (for the night anyway)

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Hi Steven :wave:



Lookin' good. :thumb:



I'm guessing you've seen the 'San Juan Car Co.' Evolution-couplers for On3 ? ???





Pretty darn nice 1:48 scale full-sized knuckle-couplers. :cool:

( I've found they are bang on for a 3/4 sized coupler in 1:35n2 )

They work really well, look good & are compatible with 'Kadee' 803 & 807 On3 couplers.





This drawing ^^ is for 'Kadee' On3 coupler height, which I'm sure you've seen.

The Evolution couplers DO actually couple to Kadee/Bachmann HO/On30 sized knuckles as well. :shocked:


Ideally they are mounted somewhat higher, as you point out ...

... but the much greater knuckle-height of the Evolutions ( higher than 'Kadee' On3s as well ) ...

... means they SHOULD couple to the lower HO sized On30 ones, each at their 'normal' height. :P



No RIVETS required for mounting either ! ;)



L:



Si.

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Si, I don't think that I had seen them.  I know that I have heard of Evolutions, but never really looked at or explored them.


Thanks for posting the image.  I put Kadee #5 boxes in, will they fit an HO Kadee box?  I was just thinking that I have a ton of Kadees from my HO days and that I would just swap out those.  AND I think that the HO couplers look about the size of the little Janey Couplers of the early 1900s.  But... they would have to be long shanks, because I didn't think about where I mounted the boxes.   And, honestly Si, I don't think there is a rivet on this entire caboose project!  :us:  However... there are a bunch of NBWs to add!  :Crazy:


I started the assembly of the walls today, but didn't take any pictures yet.  I am letting them set up.  I have them held together square with a bunch of magnets.  I work at noon tomorrow so if I get my act together in the morning I will try and take a picture or two.

Last edited on Mon Jan 15th, 2018 07:32 am by Steven B

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Moving right along.  I pulled the magnets apart and WOW! the dang thing fits on the frame/platform.  I love it when a plan falls together, rather than apart!;)  It is not glued down to the frame yet so that I can continue to add details.






Last edited on Mon Jan 15th, 2018 05:54 pm by Steven B

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" will they fit an HO Kadee box? "



Hi Steven :wave:



They are available easily & cheaply from your favorite hobby supplier. :cool:

They have the tensile-strength to pull 100 car consists*. :)

They will operate properly up in outer-space. :bg:

But ...

... NO they won't fit in an HO Kadee box. :f:



:mex:



Si.



*manufacturers estimated figure.
 

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Si, thanks for the idea about outer space, I'm still trying to reclaim my inner space as the CFOs house project drags on...  
I haven't posted much as I've been waiting... I seem to do a lot of waiting... for parts.  They finally came in by the local mail mule.  Life is tough here in Appalachia, not only are have we found that we are needing to chink the cabin for when the wind blows (it currently blows right through), but finding that "favorite hobby supplier" is pretty tough.  Things are looking up, we got us a new telegraphical moshine and I can get on that thar inter tube and order me up some stuff from the Seeers Catalog. :thumb:

I was having a really tough time with the roof of the caboose.  I know that I said that I was going to detail the interior, but I am thinking that is going to wait.  I just want to get the thing in service (never mind I only have 3' of track tacked down), because I am getting rather frustrated with this project.  I won't be lighting it after all, so detailing it too much is going to be a waste.  I did add some closets for the crew to store tools and such.  I am going to add a conductor's desk, a stove to keep 'em warm in the cool nights and maybe two bunks for the boys when they're tired.  Probably won't see any of it.:us:

Which brings me to the roof.  Hang me.  I was in fits trying to glue this monster down.  I decided that I would just form thin styrene over the arches on the ends.  I chose .020 because I thought it was flexible enough... nope.  So I ended up cutting two more arches and glued them into the interior, then had to add some "freeze blocks" to create a bigger gluing edge.  This is one of the reasons I kind of ran out of gas on the interior detailing.  I did use HO car siding because I felt that it would be representative of 1" T&G for the ceiling.  I like the effect, even though you can't see it in this picture.



I finally got the darned thing glued down and it was looking somewhat wavy, so I decide to laminate a .030 plain styrene sheet over it. This looks much better and gives me plenty of space to trim it out.  On a 1:1 caboose that I once repainted I was fascinated to find 1/4 round trim on the outside, inverted.  It was a wooden drip edge! :!:  Silly boy is going to try and do that... if I don't have to order more parts, I think that I have some 1/4 round... if not, I am just going to trim it out and forget about it.  Maybe just file it a little to "simulate".  This is taking too long now.




Finally It seems to be coming together, I am glad that the decaling adventure failed, as I probably would have wrecked them trying to glue this silly roof down.  Now to add that stove and trying to figure out a roof treatment, I think it will be a tarred felt roof, finish the underbody details and then move on to the next project... L:  which maybe an HO project for a friend.  I also have some parts coming by wagon from PSC for a locomotive project.  Then there are those passenger car kits sitting there.  And one day soon, a three-way stub switch will arrive which means things are really going to change, unless y'all'd rather hear 'bout the kitchen project?  :P



Last edited on Mon Jan 29th, 2018 07:15 am by Steven B

Reg H
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Steven:

It is good to hear about the trials and tribulations.  Too often folks walk through their descriptions like there was no effort or challenges at all.

Hearing about the challenges lets folks know that these projects are more the result of perseverance than magical skills.  Though your skills sure are top notch.

I think most of us are having to deal with a paucity of "favorite hobby dealers".  Here in Puget Sound country, really not all that far from some major urban centers, local hobby shops just are not to be found. 

I live just 20 minutes from the I-5 urban corridor that runs from the south side of Olympia to the north end of Everett and there just are very few hobby shops within a reasonable distance of home, and none at all that have extensive model railroad supplies.

BTW, last summer my wife and I drove from the Petersburg, VA area (Fort Lee) to Bolivar, TN via the Blue Ridge and Nashville.  Very pretty country.

Reg

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Hi Reg, well you might have driven right by (figuratively) my place, it's kinda on the way and not too far off the Blue Ridge Parkway.  Regarding the other coast, I spent time at Ft.Lewis in the mid-1980s and knew that area pretty well for a time.  Last time I was that way on I-5 was in the early 1990s.  I visited quite a few hobby shops that were all about trains.  I am so sorry for your loss. :sad:


Thank you for your comments, I am honored that you think my skills are good.  I like to let others know that sometimes things just don't go the way that "I" want them to.  Too many articles and "how to"s make it seem so easy and really for all the good completed projects I have many of those that just sapped my enthusiasm and lay in various states of uncompletedness.  My wife judges the skill level of some of my projects by the quality and number of the expletives used in construction.  :w: Regardless of those, I find most of my projects relaxing and fun.  I just promised myself that I wouldn't let an On30 project go the way of many of my HO ones.  I would get all to a level of completeness so that if I never got back to them, they wouldn't be a waste and could be used in my new endeavors.  Gotta keep a tight grip on the monster!  :)

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Steven:

I think you and I might be a lot alike.  I have quite a store of semi-finished projects.

We did just about the entire Blue Ridge Parkway in one very long day.  Ended the day in Johnsonville, TN, the hometown of my wife's grandmother.  We were on our way to visit an online friend of mine in Bolivar, TN.  So we got to see a lot of the state.  

The I-5 corridor has changed quite bit since the 1990's.  That whole area has grown a great deal.  I have been in volume traffic jams on I-5 (especially in the Ft. Lewis, now the Joint Base Lewis McChord, area) on Sunday afternoons.  

The Washington State Department of Transportation isn't much help.  They are attracted to the vision of getting people out of their cars.  Which won't happen.  And the recent train wreck is a pretty good commentary on the level of competency. 

There used to be a great hobby shop, Pacific Hobbies, in Lakewood, another good one in Bremerton, and the ne plus ultra railroad hobby shop, Northend Hobby, in the Roosevelt area of Seattle.   All gone now. 

We had a good hobby shop in Shelton.  It didn't carry much in the R-t-R category, but had a great selection of scratch building supplies.  It has been gone for at least five years. 

Having whined about all that, living in small-town Washington State is very fine stuff, indeed.

Reg

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So I had about 45 minutes before I had to leave for work today...

I want to get this roof up.  The only information that is available apparently are these two photos which I have posted earlier.  In examining, the drawing excluded a chimney, but there looks to be one in one photo, the fella on the roof in the second hides it.  So I am going with the thing on the right side of the caboose.  I want my right side to be the "open window" side.  When I built the lockers inside I planned for this.  




To begin with, I chose a drill bit about the same size as the shroud.  It's not rocket science, it's train science.  So close enough is good enough.




I then wanted to do a tarred roof.  I felt this to be about the most accurate for this little crummy.  I was going to cut swaths of tissue and glue it down, but I couldn't find any readily (my people have been sick).  Then I thought "WAIT!" I have this left over stuff from an HO project roof.  It is only 1/4 wide, 1 foot in O, but hey whats a roll between friends.  I used it.  It is able paper and has a sticky side.  I thought it was rather thick in HO but in O it is pretty nice.




Here it is done all the way.  I measured occasionally to keep it straight enough.  It wouldn't do to have the thing "walk" and end up with a crooked layout.  That's all for now as the money waits to be made.;)


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Howdy Steven & Reg, the H&TRy is coming along nicely. The caboose is very, very nice. Thanks for showing it and letting us watch the build. On hobby shops, here in Dallas, there used to be 5 or 6 trains only stores and several others that carried supplies like wood, plastic, etc. Now, in a large city like Dallas, Tx...there is just one Hobby Town which has all kinds of stuff but specializes in radio control (nice for me since I use it in my locos) and some bits & pieces that I can use. That's IT! The only train store is in a neighboring town and they specialize in RTR and high dollar stuff. Maybe some Grandt Line parts that were ordered long ago and forgotten about and things that may be interesting to me...and THAT IS ALL THERE IS! I am thankful that I don't throw anything away and have enough junk to last several lifetimes, just some paint & glue gets me by. Frankly, the local Hobby Lobby has gotten most of my money since they have this n' that which seem to work for my trains. A most interesting situation for sure. The nice old "mom & pop" hobby shops are long gone...but NOT forgotten.

Woodie

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And if it's any consolation Woodie, it's much the same here in the UK. A few bigger on line stores and box shifters but virtually none of the old "just round the corner" emporiums.
Shame but that's commercial life I guess.
And Steven, I should say that the caboose is looking very good. I do like your roof covering method too.

Last edited on Wed Jan 31st, 2018 09:10 pm by slateworks

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Hi Doug :wave:



You've been pounding the pavements in 'the smoke' for a few years, right ?

Remember any of these ? :-



'Victors' - Pentonville Road

'Kings Cross Models' - York Way

'Beatties' - High Holborn

'Hobbytime' - West Wickam

'Jones Models' - Turnham Green

'The Signal Cabin' - Orpington



Sigh . . .



???



Si.

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Thanks for the progress shots on the caboose, I love what you have so far!

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Well I have been pecking at this thing here and there for days, and have not taken images as much as I should have.  I have added hand rails with bent brass.  I also started working up a braking system based loosely on the C&S bobbers.  Keep in mind that I model before the widespread use of airbrakes, so they will not be present.  Get out your brake club.  I also forgot, L:   all pictures loaded to the "Gallery" must have a "landscape" format, so  turn your screen sideways...





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Man, that's very nice work! Sideways don't bother me, I see things that way anyway! And l & p couplers...excellent.

Woodie

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" I also forgot, all pictures loaded to the "Gallery" must have a "landscape" format "



Hi Steven :wave:



The Freerails 'Gallery' will accept either Landscape or Portrait formats, no problem.

The only criteria for 'Gallery' uploads, is that the file-size must be under 0.5 MegaBytes.



I suspect that if your photo was taken on a cellphone ...

... that the phones 'position sensor' has registered what you thought was a Portrait, as a Landscape.



Happens to me on mine fairly often, especially on close-ups.

I just rotate ones like that by 90-deg. using my FREE ! install 'PIXLR Express' app. ...

... and BINGO !  Bob's yer Uncle, no neck strain ! ;)



Darn fine lookin' 'boose you're makin' there Steven.

I didn't mind cranking the neck a few inches starboard, to have a good gander ! :shocked:



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.

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I'm with Woodie.  I kind of tend to look at things from an odd angle.

The caboose is looking very good.

Reg

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I guess I get a little involved.

I email photos, either from my phone or my camera, to myself.

Then I open them in Gimp (an Open Source photo processing application for Linux), do any orientation adjustments (my phone almost always delivers stuff upside down), resize, save under a different name, and then go on from there.

I think there is a version of Gimp for Windows.   I find it does everything I need to do at least as well as PhotoShop, and it is Open Source, which means you don't pay anything for the license. 
I have been 90% Windows free for several years now.  There are still a couple of things for which I need Windows at work, and it is always irritating having to put with Windows when those occasions arise. 


Reg

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Reg H wrote: I think there is a version of Gimp for Windows.
There is, it's my go-to image manipulator on Windows.

It can be downloaded at gimp.org

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Eric T wrote: Reg H wrote: I think there is a version of Gimp for Windows.
There is, it's my go-to image manipulator on Windows.

It can be downloaded at gimp.org

Lookie there!  Another Washingtonian!

Reg

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Reg H wroteLookie there!  Another Washingtonian!

Reg

I was wondering if you were in Shelton, Washington.  :D

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Why thank you fellers!  I am very grateful for your praise.  Do keep in mind though that I am VERY technologically incompetent.  I am lucky that I can take the photos on my cellaphone without taking it to the drugstore to get them developed!  Also realize that I am modeling a caboose without airbrakes because I am so archaic!  

Anyway got some mounting pedestals built and got me a set of them thar Foothill brake beams.  Bango brakes!  Now I just have to build some lever action on the under carriage, a little more paint and we got us some hind end protection.:cool:



I also need to mention that the beams are set up for On3, but as Jerry Kitts shows (as well as the photo below) it really doesn't matter too much from the side view.  Just don't look at her from the bottom up.;)  More progress soon I hope.  :time:  It is supposed to rain like Noah built an ark this weekend  Thanks again guys.  I like posting the progress because it makes me work on this stuff.  Still waiting for locomotive parts to arrive.  :slow:


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" I am modeling a caboose without airbrakes because I am so archaic! "



Hi Steven :wave:


Sounds quite mooodern to me sonny ! :old dude:


Wolfy on the Mysterious :moose: Mountain line ...

... just shoves an ol' Model-T engine on a chain orrrf the end platform to slow down !! :shocked:

( he used to be in the Navy ) ;)



" I like posting the progress because it makes me work on this stuff "


That's what we're here for Steven. :thumb:

Just wait till we all start counting rivets & saying we don't like it. :f:

That'll slow you down, quicker than a boat-anchor ! :P



:pimp:  Pimp my pedestals !!



Si.

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All back full Mr. Wolfy!  Thanks Si.

Last edited on Sat Feb 10th, 2018 04:21 pm by Steven B

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UhOh!  :doh:

I just found a project that I promised that I would do for a friend who models On3 Eastern Logger/Coal hauler based on a couple of different prototypes.  His layout is about 40 years in the future, but in SW VA horses were the norm up until WWII for many operations.  Heck, farmers even "sledded" stuff as wheels were expensive!  So I guess we could call this the Wild East!  His layout is much further along than mine, which is still waiting on the CFOs house.  But being engrossed with the Caboose, I was cleaning up some of the stuff an happened upon this box, with two horses in it.... opps.  We are all meeting on the 19th for an op session down east in Maine via Roanoke...  But I gotta finish these horses!!!!:w:

Someone asked on another forum about my figures, I don't like to hijack threads, so I'll cover some stuff here.  I love painting figures and of course horses, so here's a quick and dirty step by step.  The horses are from Aspen.  First, get some really nice brushes, hide some money from the CFO and spend a dime to buy some high quality brushes.  Mine are Windsor & Newton.  I have switched mostly to these, there are some others that are smaller, but quality makes all the difference when going small, say O Scale.

First I work up the shadows, you can use black, but black is flat and doesn't make "depth".  I use a series of browns and sometimes to darken them up use a dark blue, this makes almost black, but not.  Here's initial shadows, early on neatness does not count.



I don't even wait for the paint to dry.  I use Model Master Acrylics for painting figures as they dry pretty fast and I don't have to worry about clean up as I change colors quickly.  I keep a mug of water handy and constantly dip the brush in the water to keep it clean.  I then put a base coat on of the primary color.  In this case "Earth Red".  Again neatness does not count, just get it on.



After that, I then "wash" the whole shebang with another brown, I opted for a darker "Burnt Umber" for this.  REMEMBER it is a wash, a thin coat. only.  Again neatness does not count. It needs to be thin enough to settle into the "recesses" of the figure.  This will eventually act as shadowing.  Never have I seen an animal or a people for that matter who are a single color.  Shadowing is the keep for making standout figures.

  
Ok... Time to go to work.  :y:  

Last edited on Mon Feb 12th, 2018 08:31 pm by Steven B

Lee B
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Steven B wrote:




I just found a project that I promised that I would do for a friend who models On3 Eastern Logger/Coal hauler based on a couple of different prototypes.  His layout is about 40 years in the future, but in SW VA horses were the norm up until WWII for many operations.  Heck, farmers even "sledded" stuff as wheels were expensive!






 





Funny you'd mention this as my parents were born/raised in northeast Tennessee and were kids during WW2. They both have told me of the sleds and I'm researching them to make a couple of models of them for my 1943-ers layout. They said people would walk alongside them but that the loads were quite impressive. I guess those mountain folk were too poor even for wheels!

Your post is the only one I've seen in any forum talking about it.



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Howdy Lee!  :wave:

Well my first exposure to this "sled" idea came about 10 years ago while trying to build a shelf switching layout with my son.  I wanted a station that wasn't a "station".  I was kind of working off the later years in Mina, NV concept, a freight station if you will that wasn't monstrous.  I found this little kit from King Mill called "Green Cove Station."  I thought "Cool" :cool: and bought it. 

Green Cove was on the Virginia & Carolina Railroad and was subsequently owned by the N&W.  It the kit's instructions talked about this thing called the Virginia Creeper... yeah, whatever,  :y:  I just liked the building, but it included this sled based on the O. Winston Link photo found here ... 

 http://vacreepertrail.blogspot.com/2006/09/green-cove-station.html  

A sled?!  What the heck?!  :shocked:  Fast forward almost ten years, I am no longer working for CA State Parks and working for an outfit managing campgrounds in National Forests.  The CFO however has decided that she wants to move near mama, an hour outside of Roanoke.  I tell the company president and he says, "Well, we have a spot out there on this place called Mt Rogers NRA that needs you."  "OK," says I, so we kind of do the Beverly Hill Billies in reverse.  We packed up the truck and moved the family from Californy.  Hills that is, South Western VA, home of the sled and VA Creeper.  One of the campgrounds wouldn't you know was kind of a base camp for those riding their bikes on this here Virginia Creeper bike trail, right through Green Cove! :2t:  Green Cove Station has been preserved replete with vintage store merchandise.  Right up my historical interpretive alley.:thumb:

Now, one of my employees, an octogenarian, was "Born on this mountain and gonna die on this mountain."  He would have been born in Green Cove, but his mama was diagnosed with the consumption and was sent to live in a sanitarium.  So, he was born in Abington if I remember correctly.  BUT she ended up not having tuberculosis... can you believe, she didn't contract it from living with all those who had it?!  Golly what a risk!  :w:Anyway he lived much of his youth in... wait for it... Green Cove!  He used to hop trains to visit family and friends up in White Top.  I guess the trains didn't go very fast.  Anyway his daddy was a preacher and came to preach at a local church but didn't like the fact that they were not welcoming to outsiders, so he started another, both still hold services.  He pointed out his house, it's been fixed up, he pointed out the soda works, it's a house now.  Anyway, I digress, and I had to ask, his daddy had a sled, everyone had a sled, he said wheels just weren't easy to come by and they were pricey.  There was plenty of hardwood around to fashion runners, so that's what they did.  It was years before he saw his first automobile.  I think he said he was about seven, I guess that would have just about been during the war. :Salute:

The whole of it is, that I became rather familiar with VA, NC and TN railroads in a short space.  The campground was even built on the Laurel Railway a 3' Logger in the teens (also a basis for my friends railway).  Another employee helped build the campground (retired NFS) and one of the sites was actually the logging camp and they found all kinds of trash ('er artifacts).  It was one ridge over from Konnarock, another mill town with the Hassinger's running trains too.  Even saw some of the Tweetsie, that's why I like your thread Lee.  :)   But I am still a water logged desert rat at heart. ;)

In case you couldn't figure it out, I love a good story.  It is funny where the roads of life wind and where they lead to.  God bless Bobbie Hart.  More on horses tomorrow. :pop:

Last edited on Tue Feb 13th, 2018 09:47 am by Steven B

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Meanwhile back in the stable...

I "dry brushed" the base "Earth Red" over the high spots of the horses.  I also touched up over some of the visible overslop of the "shadows" to reduce their size.  The deep shadows are only supposed to be in the deeply recessed areas, like under the harnessing and on the underside of the horse.



Then I mixed a little "Earth Red" with "British Armor Sand" to highlight the really high spots.  I very rarely mix white to lighten a color.  White decreases the richness of a color.  So I try to use an "adjacent" color to lighten or darken a base color.  I also added some white highlights to the horses, like around the fetlock and on the nose.




Now it is time for harnessing.  I love how Aspen pays attention to detail.  Their harnessing is nicely done.  When painting it I wanted a "rich" leather.  I began with "Raw Sienna" a deep red color.  I only painted the "top" of the leather.  I wanted the shadows that we created earlier preserved.  So this is just a start.   Until next time...

Lee B
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Wow, great work on the horse painting!

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I agree, great hoss painting! I only have about 20 or 30 equines to slather paint on. Maybe I can get some done before I check out. Many of mine don't have saddles so hopefully they will be a bit "easier". I have some mules and some burros (O scale mules)...I guess I had better get to work.
Again, some fine work shown.

Woodie

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I'm watching your progress with earnest as I have a few horses and donkeys that need painting.

Death Valley has donkeys roaming free...left overs from prospector days.

Steven B
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:hyp:Thank you fellers.  Woodie, I personally have about 70-80ish horses, mules and oxen to paint up for my own layout.  It is a daunting task at best.  This is one of the problems with modeling an earlier era.  Finding wagons is another issue!  Only recently has there been a decent offering and I have been laying aside dough to get a few. I have to show freighting teams at a terminus as the railroad would serve many outlying camps and towns where mining takes place.  And while I am trying desperately not to count rivets, some things just "have" to be historically correct for me... ugh its a disease, I hope it ain't catching.  :hyp: Michael, there are also wild horses out there in Ash Meadows.  They are true castilian blooded beasts (they were typed once), directly descended from the conquistadores.

I have purchased a number of "20 Mule Teams" as these were not just limited to Death Valley.  I purchased a picture many years ago of a team on the old Mono Road between Sonora and Bridgeport/Bodie.  I don't have it handy but there were about 16 mules pulling on the leads.  The saying, "I'll be there with bells on," apparently came from the freighting business.  These mules have bells on in a (***) looking thing above the leads.  These were to give a heads up to teamsters (yes another old term, not union) around the bend that they were facing another freighter.  :cb:
Now for yet another story!  :old dude:  When the Golden Gate Bridge was opened, a mule team was taken across in the procession.  It was worried that the team couldn't make the turns in The City.  Well boys never you worry.  Teams were trained to step over and out of the traces as they cornered tight turns, so that the mules were actually pulling on the "outside" of the traces and each pair in turn would do that until the entire team was around the corner and they would then in sequence step back into them.  Must be an amazing thing to see.  i would give my right arm to go in the Way Back Machine to see that!  Mules are a very smart... and funny animal.  I rode one once in Cedar Breaks who would kick rocks over the edge of the trail and watch them fall down into the ravine for entertainment! :P  She did it over and over again.

Anyway... I did a "blackwash" over the leather this morning to highlight the shadows of the hardware.  I noticed that one of the ball top hames was missing on a critter.  So I got a piece of scrap styrene rod and CAed it then formed a "ball" of CA on the top.  "Boom!"  Fixed hame. 



I then "dry brushed" (or tried) all the hardware, including the bits a brass color.  Los caballos son listos por trabajar.  :2t:  I am pretty happy.  About 3 hours total into the project.  


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Those horses look great. Good paintjob and thanks for the tutorial on how you did that.

Which color did you use for the brass?

Alwin

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Hi Steven :wave:


Nice work ! :thumb:

Any tips for painting a 4 :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: moose wagon team ?


:P


Si.

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Thank you fellas.  I appreciate the comments.  Alwin, the brass is an old bottle of Floquil Gold.  I had to go look at it... I don't know it was a gold color and it was in the box so I grabbed it.  It's getting a little thick.  

Hmmmm painting Moose...:w: I would get a very big brush and about four tranquilizer darts... and a very fast pair of Keds.

But wait, I've also been working on the caboose again.  I needed to put some kind of brake rigging on the thing, and have been thinking and thinking and thinking  L:  It's sometimes very painful.  But I looked at what photos that I could find of the C&S bobbers.  I decided that there were brakes on one side of the wheels, the inside.  Huh, how to rig it up, as they were all airbrake versions.  So I played with some levers and came up with this plan.  Not saying it is perfect or that it might work in real life, but it might stop on the model railroad  ????




I think it looks good enough from the side.  Not bad for working off of a drawing from two grainy ancient photos of 100 years back.  Now I gotta get some steps on the end platforms.  Oh and I have an idea for a brakeman/conductor.  I'm also thinking it is going to need some weight to track nicely.  Haven't got any place at this point to really put it through the paces.  More to follow.  :cb:




Last edited on Sun Feb 18th, 2018 07:46 am by Steven B

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Late last night I was thinking, I need a brakeman/conductor to ride on this 'boose.  I was going through my figures and I have a few by Echo Mountain.  These are well done figures and came pre-painted.  They are perfect late 1800s engine crews.  This guy came with pin stripe pants even.  Detailed painting for a very affordable dude.  But wait, I don't have affiliation or any other monetary investment in Echo Mountain, I am just pleased with my purchase.
:)




Now just a minute, this guy looks a little like a friend of mine! :!: Grady and I became very good friends when I was doing historical work.  He was a wonderful man who had a second chance at life after a severe health scare.  Grady and I (and a couple of other friends) worked on a "Learning Channel" film about the Transcontinental Railroad.  In this film a Shay was the first locomotive across the USA and a big nosed Kraut (me) drove every spike, not the Irish (my friend Patrick "Need not Apply" ;) ).  Grady passed on the John Muir Trail of a massive heart attack some years back but I think of him often.




Since I was involved in painting figures (horses), I decided to tackle this project.  First thing to do was to give him his goatee.  I used a small bit of Squadron Putty and shaped it with my knife.




 I filed down the dudes "porkpie" hat and cut a wide brim from paper and stiffened it with CA.  Repainted it to a straw hat and then it was just a matter of repainting the figure.  Sorry Echo Mt., loved your work, hated to redo it.  Bango!  Done.  This was a really fun project.  My wife commented, that she was concerned because there hadn't been any expletives in the time that it took to do this project.  :cool:  Grady, I still miss you man, but now you get to ride the platform forever, like you did at the end of the film.


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Great way to remember a friend. Good job on the hat too, it is tougher than you made it look

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Thanks Duane!  He was a good guy.  [toast]
Well, this should be the last post on the Caboose.  As of last night I felt it was completed.  I added some Foothill WSL Co Caboose Steps.  I really like the idea of metal supports.  The drawing had them differently, but the photos in the book just didn't show them very well.  So liking the look of the FMW steps I used them and am very happy with the end result.   

I used the Grandt NBWs to help bond the steps to the cab platform.  CA is great for fast work, but it is very brittle and have had bad experiences with operators knocking details off.  :f:  To hold it all in place to begin with I CAed it into position.  With Grandt castings being made of styrene and the frame being made of styrene, I left the "bolt" on the casting and drilled a #77 hole into the frame through the FMW etching. placed the "bolt" through the hole and into the frame.  Then flooded around the area with some MEK to get the plastic to bond.  So now the steps are "bolted" to the frame and maybe a little less prone to damage?  :dt:







Now it is time to figure out what might be the next project?  L:   The CFOs house still isn't complete enough to start the layout, so it will have to be a component again.  The parts for the loco still are not here...  :us:  I might have to dive into a passenger car.  I attempted one way back at the beginning, but was not quite happy with that I had accomplished so I sold it.  I think that maybe I will do it "right" this time.  

But being honest, if I complete a project a year, I ain't never gonna get this thing up and running!!!  :slow:    Gotta pick up the pace.  :time:  Thanks for following along, this forum makes me work on stuff, otherwise I might not even have this stuff done.





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Next project.....  took a bit of thinking  L:  to decide.  I really wanted to start a layout component, but I'm having a three-way stub built... (I'm not ready to do that yet, don't have my shop up, just a spare room) it's not here yet, must be with the locomotive parts in Purgatory.

The Nevada Central (the railroad that I am kind of basing the H&T on) bought two used Carter Bros. combines from the defunct Monterey & Salinas.  One of the cars is preserved in the CSRM (my crappy picture)



I don't really want to scratch build the cars.  So I was looking for a couple of components to suggest these cars.  Combine of course, nine side windows, duckbill roof, and frilly woodwork.  I was very pleased when I found Deerfield River Laser.  Their Maine 2' B&B "Fawn" car fit the bill, it is even really close to the actual length of the original.



It isn't quite the car that I want. Buuuut, it fits most of my criteria.  The only thing is the location of the express/baggage door is not right, but hey, this is the H&T not the NC and remember that rivet counting thing that I have mentioned, yeah, well it applies here too.  I want a railroad that I can operate in my lifetime.  :old dude:

I did one of these previously and posted a picture way back in the early days in post #2.  I modified it and then decided that I could do it differently and be happier, so I bought two more kits and two more of these....  




Now why anyone would buy these, I guess I don't get it.  But they sure are cheap on fleabay.  I also picked up two duckbill roofs for Jackson & Sharp Coaches from San Juwan and will modify them to fit.  :)  Let's see how quick a quick kit can be.

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So this weekend began the passenger series.  I disassembled one of the combines and it doesn't have the interior L:   Oh bother.  Maybe I'll build the interior, this will wait to be seen.  Again I am building from the hip, instructions in one hand and blade in the other.  I am not sure that this will be a "Quick Kit" as advertised as I already began cutting on the thing.

One of the important components is the rounded corners.  The doors have rounded corners too.  So out came the quarter round and in order to make it fit the frame, I had to cut down some of the side of the car.  No worries!  :)  Zip, zip with a razor and done.  Then I had to widen the combine doors, zip, zip, done.  I then used 400 emery cloth to smooth out some of the grain on the plywood.  If you notice on the car in the museum, it is pretty smooth, no wood grain, I want this as much as possible on the car.  Unmarred side is below the hacked up side.




"Now," says the casual observer, "what about those frilly etchings that are now halved on the ends?"  "No problem," says I.  "I fill them with CA and sand them smooth."  This was an old trick I learned from guys who worked on guitars.  Fill the gaps with "Gap Filling" CA, sand it smooth and paint... good as gold.:thumb:

I then added the letter board.  I kind of wanted to paint it separately, but needed to know how much to offset the end quarter round.  So I CAed it on cut it flush then CAed the end quarter round and cut it flush too.  So far so good.  :pop:


Last edited on Mon Feb 26th, 2018 07:16 am by Steven B

Si.
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" Now why anyone would buy these, I guess I don't get it.  But they sure are cheap on fleabay "



Hi Steven :mex:



I WISH !

Why indeed would anyone buy those ?

I would, if I could get the darn things. :f:



In England, where On30 is as rare as hens-teeth ...

... we're talkin TRAIN ROBBERY ! for a couple of el-crapo del-scrapo coaches like that ! ;)



Mighty fine work by your carshop on that 'boose Boss ! :thumb:

I'm sure those new coach sides of yours are gonna look the biz !! :)



Keep on BASHin' ! :cb:



:moose:



Si.

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Thanks Si!   Well I keep peckin' at it.  Work and the house sure take up quite a bit of modeling time.  But I figure posting here makes me do as much as I can when I can.  The CFO's kitchen is looking good, most of the mud is up on her bathroom walls, now I need to sand it and seal it.  But there is always an hour here and a half hour there.

The San Juwan roofs that I want to use are too wide and too long (they're On3, not B'mann On30 - But that's OK the cab got built to On3 standards, so the choice was made).  To make them fit to the B'mann floors, I was going to have to draw and quarter them, that's a lot of cutting to try and keep square!  Without the real shop in play yet, that could be a challenge.  So I pulled out the calipers to see what the difference was and it came out to about .090 per side (inches that is - yes I know the Yankee arcane system of measurement - had a big discussion with a S.African friend about it - in defense of my fellows, I told him the French invented it and there was no way a true Red, White and Blue Yank would follow the French - no offense to our French friends here, I didn't make that decision! :) )





So... with the thickness of the walls considered, I added a strip of styrene .080 to each side.  I may have to sand it down some when I go to assemble, but right now, it looks about right for roof overhang.  Now this only leaves me with two cuts for the roof to shorten it, but I will have to add width to the car ends, easy peasy (says I now).  I've also been talking to some folks about lighting.  :cool:  More on that later when I get a little closer to the need.

 



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I began working on the ends today.  Had an hour or so before I needed to leave for the weekend.  I began by removing them from the panel and then squared up the door to better match the Carter Bros. car that I am using as a guide.   I widened it too, so that it wouldn't be too narrow when I added quarter round to the inside of the door frame like the original car.  I also had to "widen" the end, again due to only wanting to shorten the SJ roof, not narrowing it too.  So I added .080 styrene to the sides and filled in the tab slot that will not be used.  I filled in the gaps with CA and filed and sanded smooth.  I also took steel wool to the whole end to knock down some of the wood grain.  Here is the progression in a photo. The side extensions hang down because they will have to accommodate the widened B'mann frame.  Not thinking, I cut them flush and found that I had to add "pigtails" to them.  Styrene, love it.





Next, I have to think about the roof.  I am using a duckbill style to back date the car.  This means that the laser cut form will not work.  I took a pencil and held the car up to the roof and traced the outline.





So I was way skeered to cut it. :w: I thought for sure I would choke and split the end, especially at the door way.  I made sure the #11 blade was sharp, sharp, sharp and took a number of freehand passes along the pencil line.  No breaks!  :shocked:  But I did have a some of the veneer separate.  I used CA to fill and sanded it down to smooth.  :cool:




 
Well it is looking pretty good.  I knew that I would have to trim it out and that I wasn't going to get it perfect, but it is darn close to where it needs to be.  Dang, I love it when a plan comes together!  :glad:  Now I only have three more to do!  If you hadn't noticed, I am kind of working on one car at a time, just in case my road map takes me off a cliff! :cool:





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Hi Steven :wave:



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Is that a really nice photo of a really nice caboose ? ...

... or is that a really nice caboose in a really nice photo ??





Either way things are lookin'  C :cool: :cool: L  on the Humboldt & Toiyabe Railway ! :thumb:



Those laser-parts look very sharp & good to work with.

Shame they don't come with the Yankee Doodle Dandy decals. :f:



;)



Si.

Si.
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Hi Steven :wave:



How's it going with the coach project ?





I do like the 'tribute' model figure, of your friend Grady.



:cb:



Si.


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Hi Si, thanks for asking.  :wave:

 I've been doing quite a bit of lurking lately, so I haven't been a stranger.  Like your cranes and lowboys.   I had a project for a client that I had to get done, so it took away from my personal modeling time.  Also the weather broke and the Chief Financial Officer wants a garden, so I've been outside mostly the past couple of weeks mulching my fruit trees and cutting back the grass... my how it likes to grow.  :cb:  Next comes the rototiller and trying to remove all those vile blackberry roots.  Yeeehaw.  or is that Heehaw?  Green Acres that's the place for me.  

But summer is coming, and the beautiful thing about working in a college support industry... things slow waaaaaayyyyy doooooowwwwnnn.  :slow:  I am hoping to jump on the car again in a couple of weeks when school lets out.

I am excited about getting it done.  I just got paint for it, so it should be hitting the paint shop very soon.  Stay tuned.:pop:

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Alrighty y'all....  It seems that I haven't had much to share on the combine lately.
I had to put it aside for projects for clients....  stupid work, but I am grateful.:bg:


But that doesn't mean that when I have 5-10 minutes that I haven't been doing something.  Here is some of the stuff that I have accomplished.  The great thing about figures is that you can put a little color on and walk away when you have to.  Come back and there is no real thought process other than color.  Quick, dirty spurts of work, just to move it all along.


Here is the crew for the future steamboat "Phaul Lee".  They were modified from the Eduard kit (a couple went to a friend who has vessels in a coastal Maine town).  The guy on the ladder may get a fireman's helmet because of his shirt.  His uniform had two rows of buttons that I made to look like a "placket" or "fireman's overshirt" so common in the mid 1800s.  The chief engineer (pipe smoker - too relaxed for a track gang), is an AC Stadden figure.  I changed a few heads and filled/filed some breeches into trousers - Boom!  A crew for the Lee.








Next is the beginnings of the shop crew.  Maybe with a shop crew the combine will get completed a little faster.
One is an Aspen figure the other is an S&D 1:43, huge difference in size, but the Aspen guy is a little small compared to the Eduard guys... I use 1:48/1:43 interchangeably, I just watch who is standing next to each other and it helps to force perspective.  The other thing to keep in mind is that figures bounce all over in size even within manufacturers.  So do humans... so in the words of Bill Murphy, "I got that going for me."





Here is my lone engine crewman of the series.  I think he might actually fire a boiler for the stamp mill.  Not sure who he came from now, picked up so long ago.





The we have some passengers and a station agent, patiently, maybe not so much, for the combine to get out of the shop.  Joke is on them, then they will have to wait for a locomotive!:P  AC Stadden, S&D, Builders in Scale and Knuckleduster.





Oh, and I didn't mention that the passengers will also have to wait for some tracks to be laid down.  Hahahaha!  Maybe, but isn't there a bond out there if we get it done by a certain time in a certain year?!  :shocked:  Uhoh, better get the track gang out there.  Here they are AC Stadden figures, Navies 1 & 2, Americanized with some, new hats (too many bowlers for 1880 USA), a supervisor, Freedmen and some Irish laddies.  I have some Chinese but none of them are quite ready for prime-time.  But a crew has now been hired.  So fellas, get busy... quit looking like your posing for a photo.





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Hey Y'all,

My projects for others are pretty completed.  So I have been dusting off the ol' Humboldt & Toiyabe projects.  While on TDY to the 1972 Rio Grande for my client, I happened to run into a Shapeways offering (not mine and not pitching for anyone - so don't start) for a "bolt on" duckbill roof upgrade for the, wait for it...

Bachmann Coach!  :glad:  





I'm just a little stoked.  So I ditched the old frame that I was using and had widened, am cutting off the styrene shims that I had glued on the ends of the combine, putting away the razor saw for the San Juan Car Shops roof, and going with a straight build.  :dt:

Note to self, "This is not a prototype!  No need to take it to the hyper level, cause it ain't real!
This is On30 and fun." :clown:

New frame compared to the SJC roof and the new Shapeways roof.  I think were in good Shapeways now to move this project along faster than I originally thought.  I bought three roofs.  Two Combines and I have a baggage car laying around that I want to upgrade (er backdate).





More to follow.  I work early the next couple of days, but maybe there will be some time on Sunday.
I'm pretty fired up.


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" I'm pretty fired up "


Hi Steven  :wave:



Check your safety-valve ... We don't want a boiler  E X P L O S I O N !  :shocked:

Nice find from Shapeways.  :)



Them's a mean lookin' bunch of hombres yer got workin' for yer dude !  :mex: :cb:  :old dude:  [toast]






:cool:



Si.


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Thanks Si.  It's gonna take a passel o' mean dudes to get the rail laid the rate that we are moving!  :time:  

Started working on some old V&T Shops (currently Wiseman) Carter Bros. passenger trucks for the combine today.  These are really cool and very different from the myriad of D&RGW trucks available and the Bachmann style.  They are cast white metal and need a ton of filing and fitting.  I primered the first truck parts today.  I hope to get some assembly done and picts soon.  My goal is to give it that "Western Swing" so that we have no question about where the railroad is located.

I've mostly been working on the under frame now that I've made the roof switch.  The roof was the hardest part, and a bit of a stumbling block.  Also, if you all remember, I made the decision to go with On3 coupler heights with the caboose (I may hate this when it comes to getting engines running - but I'll burn that bridge when I get to it), so I have been cutting and filing to raise the coupler boxes on the frame.  I also have to remove all of the "airbrakes" as I model pre-airbrakes.  I'm liking where the project is going.  Pictures to follow.
:2t:

Last edited on Fri Jun 1st, 2018 01:38 am by Steven B

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Combine Frame Part Duck.
So having scraped the first frame after widening it to match the SJC roof, I have been working on the second attempt at a frame.  I realize that if this is not a prototype model (and note to self - it is not), then I need only go so far to make it look right.  So I just filed down the cast on brake detail that is only visible below the frame while the car is on the track.  Easy peasy.  I don't intend for it to be inverted.  The coupler pads also had to be filed down to match then On3 standards gauge.  I couldn't do any of that until I got the trucks built... done.  And done.
:2t:





I also shaved off the clunky truss rods and queen posts.  I have a set of upgrade details from Wiseman.  I will fix these next and come up with a plausible brake system.  I use hand brakes not air brakes and unfortunately, I didn't really look under the car when I was in Sacramento those many years back.  I always feel kind of goofy with my wife looking on when I am foaming, so I always rush and forget stuff.  I will add the coupler boxes and truss rods next. and then see where that goes.  I also need to start thinking about lighting and a battery storage compartment.  Probably an AAA battery, according to my sources this should be enough to supply power to six SMD LEDs.
:us:




I know you're asking, "Are those ORANGE TRUCKS?!!!"  To that I say, "Yup."  "Are you nuts?"  "Yup.  But that's the way of it."  Not all stuff is meant to be dreary and drab and black.  Can't see it very well in my photos of the model, but I tried to simulate the detail painting too.
:hyp:





No, they're not quite the same truck, but again, this isn't a prototype model, whew.  :bg:  I will be hitting the road for a couple of weeks next weekend.  Going to go visit my pop who lives just off the ol' Feather River Route.  Then I'm gonna shoot out to Nevada for a couple of days and visit Austin to get pictures, measurements and dirt for the layout.  So I may not post again until I get back, but if I make some progress before, I will endeavor to get it up.

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Hi Steven,
Enjoy your trip and take care when wandering around in the scrub. Just make sure it's only dirt and twigs you pick up. Them there creepy and slithery things might be a bit unhappy if you try to give them a new home :bg:

We'll be still here waiting for the next post after you get back,

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" Started working on some old V&T Shops (currently Wiseman) Carter Bros. passenger trucks for the combine today.
These are really cool and very different from the myriad of D&RGW trucks available and the Bachmann style."



Hi Steven.  :cb:



They are really  C :cool: :cool: L  looking trucks !  :thumb:



Maybe, just maybe, I might have to investigate a pair of those myself.  L:

I have 1 pair of Bachmann On30s, & of course lots of 'Tri-ang' Diecasts, in the stash at present.


But those 'V&T Shops' def. have that 'vintage' look to them !  :old dude:

Thanks for the tip off !!



:)



Si.


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Time for some motivational therapy.  :wave:

I just got back from a jaunt into the desert.  To the Toiyabes to be specific.

It was to be a mid week overnight trip to photograph and go a few places that I have not yet explored.
We ran into roadwork... uh the construction crew had taken every motel room in Austin... rats!!!  L:

So I normally I would have taken camping gear, but that wasn't an option on this trip.
The next closest town... 93 miles.   :us:

So it turned into a suicide road trip, I'm famous for these in the past.
Four hour drive, one way, no big!  ;) 

I still love this place.





Here is the turntable pit.  I picked up some old coal chunks to feed my locomotives and found a spike!!!  :2t: 





More later when I get back from visiting a more local mine/mill.   :)


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Next Installment.
As I mentioned, I didn't get to all the places that I wanted to (just leaves me a destination for the future) , but I got to the place that was on my bucket list... Yankee Blade.  :Crazy:   Mines were established not long after the Pony Canyon (Austin) Mines.  They boomed the faltered and sat idle for a number of years until the late 1800s early 1900s.

The Nevada Central came to Austin in 1880.  Tracks were laid up the middle of main street by 1881.  Mules were used to move cars up and down the 7.5% grade.  I was thought the grade too steep for a locomotive.  Until one day when an engineer on the NC stormed the grade with a 4-4-0.  Made it!  :glad:


The Austin City Railway was formed and a steam dummy (see my avatar) was purchased for use on the grade and named, appropriately, "Mules Relief".  Eventually rails were extended to some of the mines, but by the mid 1890s, with the decline of the mines, it was gone. :sad:  More on this stuff later.

At any rate we went to a bunch of mines and found the town site of Yankee Blade.  Some of the mines when worked later were pretty large operations.  Found two boilers at different locations and the foundations for a cyanide mill that wasn't on any maps.  Colorado eat your heart out!  I love this place.




The Ward Shaft still has a boiler in place.  The hoisting works has collapsed onto the dump below the shaft behind the photo.  Round nails in the collapsed hoist house indicate late construction.  1900 or so.




This is looking down form the Ward towards the collapsed tunnel of the Morris & Capel Tunnel.  That's the Heep (in Spanish the J is pronounced like an H). 



Of course I found the town.  As it wasn't my vehicle, I didn't want to 4x4 up.  So I found an nice shady place and hiked up.  I was just about to give up and turn around, when I stumbled into the dump!  Looked all over for a bottle of beer, but all were empty and broken :us:.  I did find numerous cans (some pretty early by looking at the canning process).  The bottles supported this too.  I am thinking that maybe Yankee Blade as a town didn't come back much or at all when the mines did later.  The mines that I was mostly looking at were over the ridge from the town too, rather inconvenient for miners.  All of this indicated to me 1860s trash for the most part.  I looked a little further and found the ruins of at least five stone buildings.  :glad:  A great day even if I had to turn tail and run home.


Last edited on Sun Jun 17th, 2018 05:39 am by Steven B

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"So what does all this have to do with your railroad?"
Note to self: "This is not a prototype."  You'll realize that this is a theme for me as a rivet counter in recovery.  Step One: Admitted that I was a rivet counter and that my life had become unmanageable.

To really enjoy this I need to have a reasonable plan.  I need to make it believable, even though it is pure fantasy for me.  The railroad starts at the Reese River (might have staging representing Battle Mountain - the terminus of the Nevada Central).  Ledlie will be the main shops and the interchange with the "Reese River Navigation Company" (see a previous post on this silliness - fantasy one).  The Humboldt & Toiyabe will run south following the NC grade to Austin.  Just south of this map the grade crosses US 50 and turns east to Austin.




When the railroad gets to Austin it will climb the 7.5% grade through town (fact), it will serve some of the mines and the Manhattan Mill above town with some switchbacks and spurs (fact).  Then it will head north contouring around the ridge towards Yankee Blade (fiction).




I then intend to take it up the canyons and contour around to the big mines on the north side after running though the town of Yankee Blade.  My town will be doing well.  I kind of like the Gumstump and Snowshoe style of layout to represent the area above Yankee Blade.  It is really steep up there and any rail service will have to use switch backs.  I like the idea of crossing over itself.  See recent issues of NG&SL to see what I am talking about.  




Can't wait to get home and finish the combination car!

Last edited on Sun Jun 17th, 2018 12:47 am by Steven B

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Return from the Hinterlands.
I made it back to Ol' Virginy.  I find it very funny how Lee B. and I share a similar fate, he models here and I model there.  Opposites.   :boogie:  I like his posts because I worked in his sphere of modeling for 3 years and know it well.  I digress...

At any rate while on my last last day visiting with my pop, I found a book that I forgot that he had while perusing his admirable collection of railroad books.  I believe that he has red them all!  Most deal with the railroads of California, and many of those with the North Western Pacific having run up from the SF Bay Area to Eureka.  He grew up during the last of steam and railroading in Marin County, CA.  So it is only fitting that he bought this book-




Now in my passion (:Crazy:) a number of cars came to the Nevada Central from the Monterey & Salinas when it folded due to the Wheat Cartels (not a new thing really).  The passenger car that I am working on is trying desperately to prototype out to the car in the CA RR Museum.  I am fighting myself on this, remember... it is On30 not On3 for a reason and it is the Humboldt & Toiyabe, NOT the Nevada Central for a reason.  I still find myself drawn to the prototype for inspiration though and want to Carterize my Carter Brothers cars.  After soul searching, I find that I am really happy with the direction and am happy to debase myself through not sticking to prototype, I'm looking for the flavor.
  
The car that I am working on is based on one of the first passenger cars rolled out by the Carters, so I need that "Old Timey" feel, hence the mods that I am describing.  The beautiful thing about Bruce MacGregor's massive study is that there are plans drawn for advancements and technical parts... including how hand brakes before air brakes work!  I had failed to crawl under the car when I visited it in Sacramento years past, and having once worked for State Parks, knew they would take a dim view if I had anyway.  The biggest problem when performing speed research is not knowing what you need, until you need it.  :hyp:

Being all full up with motivation after my trip and finding this book, I got upstairs to the temporary shop and continued work on the frame.  I find that I have to work in a succession of steps and think about the next so that I don't have to go back wash rinse and repeat.  First, I got the coupler boxes mounted.  I am just going to use KD #5 boxes, they work well with Foothill Model Works Link & Pin couplers.  

I pulled out the car sides and began a test fit in line with the instructions.  There are some more mods to come, but first I had to notch the frame.  When I added the 1/4 round on the ends, there was a bit of fitting problem.  The outside car side didn't fit flush to the frame as it should. So I marked and notched the frame for this mod.




Here is a close up of what I am talking about.




I couldn't just file it because I would hit the steps.  I don't really want to replace these, even though they are incredibly wrong... remember rule one.  This was supposed to be a quick project.  I guess "quick" is in the eye of the beholder.  Anyway, this is all the notches cut, now it is time to crack a book and find some dimensions for queen post sills.  More soon!  :slow:




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" The passenger car that I am working on is trying desperately to prototype out to the car in the CA RR Museum.
I am fighting myself on this, remember... it is On30 not On3 for a reason
and it is the Humboldt & Toiyabe, NOT the Nevada Central for a reason.

I still find myself drawn to the prototype for inspiration though and want to Carterize my Carter Brothers cars.

After soul searching, I find that I am really happy with the direction
and am happy to debase myself through not sticking to prototype,
I'm looking for the flavor."



" While I am a rivet counter in recovery, the "look" and "flavor" are important to me."



Hi Steven  :cb:



It's lucky that you 'landed' here at Freerails !  :thumb:



We offer for FREE !  the proven Freerails '12 Step Program' for rivet-counter recovery !!  :P

For alcohol & crack, try the Betty Ford website.  ;)



Personally I don't think there is ANYTHING " debase " ing about creating models with the " look " and " flavor " !

You're doing a 5  :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:  mooser job, if you ask me !  :)



I used to be a Westside Lumber Company " rivet counter " in 1:24n3, back in the day ...

... but as you know, I now hacksaw up ol' vintage 'Tri-ang' crap & add lots of 'imagineered' scratchbuilding ...  :cool:

... & hopefully will create some 'diamonds in the rough' with a bucket load of FUNKY railroad sparkle  :s:  to them !



Do I feel better these days ?

HELL YEAH !  :cool:



The FREE ! and proven Freerails '12 Step Program' ...

... " It works for me ! "

( Just quoting Hannibal, from 'The A-Team' ! ... You can imagine me though, with a big cigar & hacksaw ! )  ;)



However there is 1 problem you really gotta sort out Steven.

You might not speak to me again ...  ;)

... but those 'Foothill Modelworks' white-plastic wheels ...

... are  FREAKIN' AWFUL !  :f: :f: :f: :f: :f:





Totally AWESOME model, as I've said numerous times before ...

... but I just couldn't bite my lip on those damn freakin' wheels any longer.  L:



It looks like you might be planning to use some more as well.  :f:





'Foothill Modelworks' make some 5-star awesome stuff.

I've looked at their brake rigging etc. etc. & it looks really well done.



Yes, If you happen to have an Electron Microscope you can even read the writing cast into their wheel centers !

But ... FREAKIN' WHITE PLASTIC ! ?  :shocked:  ... Get outta here ?  ???



Every car build needs the FLASH  :s:  of shiny cold steel beneath it's " look and flavor ".

It is ALWAYS the sparkling diamond, on every dirty, rough & rusty piece of railroad funky junk !

And IT SHOWS !



:old dude:



Si.



( Hiding out ... till the storm blows over )  :w:


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Hey Si,  Hahahaha!:bg:
I thought they were white walls.  :pimp:

They're a light gray.  I was a little worried about the look too.  I guess the toothpaste is outta the tube.  If nobody speaks will the emperor know about his new clothes?

I really like the FMW stuff too.  They're on the combine too.  I almost painted the wheel treads a metalizer "Polished Steel".  I don't know how that (or if) it would wear.  I suspected not, so I refrained.  I imagine that it would only wear off where the wheels make contact, then again, would it flake off the derlin or just leave a line?  Or would they again be white walls?  I also have some Humbroll, it might wear better.  OK, you called it.  Time for the  :dt:  fix.

Yes, I have 10 Billmeyer & Small boxcars simmering on the back burner.  These are the Leadville Shops kits.  SWEEEEEEEET.  The NC had ten just like the D&RG cars at 8 not 10 tons, I have the whole fleet!  And trucks too, and FMW wheels sets, before I had finished the caboose.  I scrimped and saved, and got 'em!  Wheels and all, so yup, I gotta fix that.

It's a good thing that I can get 20 minutes in here and there.  Those increments keep adding up.  Full Time employment and house rebuilding and growing stuff to eat really digs into train time.  I am glad that you said something, 'cause I was just ignoring it.  I think it was Reg a few posts back (too lazy to look right now) who liked how I documented my failures too.  I just want to share my experiences so that others can see what works and what didn't.

Big Ceegars, now were talking, maybe some 21 y/o scotch to wash it down.  Combined?  Might look like a Lego Tanque Charuto?!   [toast]

Last edited on Tue Jun 26th, 2018 03:20 am by Steven B

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White Walls Begone.

Ok, so I used the Humbrol.  It sticks when many won't.  :us:  Whaddaya think?  Off to work!  Oh, the Carter Trucks for the combine use Wiseman metal wheels.  Whew!


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Moving Right Along...:slow:
This is the look that I am shooting for.  Before the NC resided the car and took out two pairs of windows from 9-7 on each side.  1880 photo.




I had some time, about 45 minutes, to work on the combine.  To be honest, I've been reading the MacGregor book, I consider that working in the hobby too.  So that really equates to hours.  I've been researching the combine.  It seems that the CA RR Museum restored the car to its "as built" layout.  That's great, but when built it was built without a "Saloon".  A WHAT?!!!  :shocked:  A bathroom.  Oh.  :us:

It was added just over a year later much to the relief of the Monterey County residents.  But where'd they put it?  Looking at photos it is nearly impossible to tell where it was.  I guess I could ask the museum, but this is a "good enough" project.  In looking at the this photo it appears that the only window you can't see through is the rear one, and the shade is up.  Bammo!  Good enough, I think that is where it will reside.  1890s rebuild.





As you can see there I am planning on putting a battery in the car for lighting.  I think, since the freight doors don't open and there are no end windows it will be hard to see.  I won't light that end, with big lights, there are no roof vents to indicate they were there.  So if there was lighting it must have been a wall light.  I may put a small one in there to simulate that, but I want it darker than the passenger compartment.

I also added new truss rods and turnbuckles.  Carter truss rods were shallow on early cars, so picked up some McCloud flat queen post brackets, added new beams and I like it.  Began to build up the brake system as well and added draft beams to the car to hide the Kadee pockets.  Also building a new floor, moved the bulkhead for the passenger compartment, will add the Saloon when I am happy with it, and have some Grandt seats, correct seats I might add.  Moving slow, but moving between house rebuilding and garden/critter support outside.  I am waiting for the on/off switch for the battery to continue.  :cb:


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Steven, I am glad to see accurate modeling being displayed. The NC is one of those railroads which modelers sometimes have the attitude of "nobody knows nuttin'" but even these arcane and obscure prototypes deserve to be built with the utmost attention to correct-ness. Great work and do carry on.

Woodie

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Thanks Woodie!  It will be far from correct though.  But it will be Carteresque!  :bg:  I guess my whole idea is combining all the stuff that I think is really cool into one idea covered by the guise of the NC.  There some lumbering and some other California narrow gauge.  

Someday when I have made my million point five, I'll break down and model correctly On3 and scratch build everything.  :boogie:  They don't have an emoji for rolling on the floor laughing my tail off.  

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" They don't have an emoji for rolling on the floor laughing my tail off "



Hi Steven  :P



Well ... We'll just have to find one then !  :us:

Specially for you !!  ;)



We aim to please ...  :)

... but often miss !  :clown:



:doh:



Si.


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Lookie, Lookie!  The paint fairy showed up!:glad:

Had some time on Sunday between services and decided to get down to business.  There are many advances that I couldn't make because I was waiting for paint.  I still don't have my paint booth up.  :f:  Part of the deal with the devil to get my building.  But, 'lectrik is there, I just need the dinero (and time between house projects) to set up plugs lights insulation and drywall.  So, I painted plen aire.  :)

I am at the point where I need to start the assembly process, and there is obviously a path, and the first part is initial painting.  I mixed color to try and match the combine in the museum.  In researching (with the book) I found that the trucks were very different when built, and there is speculation that they were purchased commercially, not built by Carter.  Later the trucks were rebuilt, if not by Carter, using Carter components.  So I am sticking with the ones that I used - close enough.  The restored car's trucks are like the originals and painted the same color as the combine.  I'll keep mine orange like the "Silver State".  The "Silver State" has Carter trucks.  If I remember correctly, the frame for the Silver State either came from the Stockton & Ione or the Monterey & Salinas Valley but the NC crews built up the car in house.  I will have to reacquaint myself with this much later when I build the Silver State... that one will be closer to prototype... I think.  L:

At any rate I like the color and have a little more paint left for car number two.  The Silver State was "Mustard Yellow."  :shades:




Wow! Very little toy box red left!  And that will disappear when the I assemble the new interior.





And... of course, a sneak peek at what it will look like assembled.  You will notice that I trimmed down the ends to fit the new duckbill roof.  Now I have to cut down the interior layer to match.  Here I did a best guess at the contour.  I have a carpenter friend who would say when things were "close" and not quite, "Putty and paint what a carpenter aint."  That will apply when I add the roof.  I be trimming out the end, this I know.  Then it is laminate and glue up the sides together.  Then decal, seal and begin the interior.  

The roof is going to be a bit of a challenge as 144 (or some such ridiculous number) tin pieces were used on the original roof.  Doh, another photo that I did not take at the museum, and can't find one in the book.
 :doh:


So far, I'm liking where this is going.



Last edited on Tue Jul 10th, 2018 03:22 am by Steven B

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That's developing very well Steven and the colour is most appealing. The dark trim really sets things up nicely.

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" So, I painted plen aire.  :) "



Hi Steven  :cb:



I love it when a plan comes together !  :thumb:

Just watch out for the dust cloud, when that posse rides through town !!  :shocked:



I haven't found that "emoji" icon for you yet ...  L:

... but with El Rapido progress such as it is ...

... I'm wondering if Super Mario would be more appropriate ?  ;)






:moose:



Si.


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Thank you Doug.  I have a late work start today and I hope to get an hour to move things along after I build the roof to the Chicken Chateau Annex.

Si, I could use a Super Mario to push the rate of construction up!  

Last edited on Wed Jul 11th, 2018 11:58 am by Steven B

Steven B
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Blinded.

I spent the better part of 45 minutes this morning working on another early railroad detail for the car.  If you looked at the photo of the inspiration car posted earlier, you may have noticed the wooden blinds.  Many 1870s-80s cars had this style of blind for the passengers.  I guess cloth ones came later.  I have to add this detail to make the car acceptable for me.

I took a pack of Grandt "Shutters" that I had, there are only 8 in the pack and without trying to find more right now I have to spread them out between 9 windows on each side.  :shocked:   Streeeeaaaaatch that resource.  Fortunately they are long and can be cut down.

I had to add the center support for the blinds.  :w:I used .010 strip styrene.  Can you imagine, that size is almost a "Why bother."  My ham hands had a very hard time with this.




But I got 'er done.




This is the idea for the look of the car.  Windows are in.  I am going to start decaling before I put it all together.  It will be easier to control the clear coat and keep it off the windows.  I also painted the interior.  I am not going to "model" the interior, but rather "suggest" it for when it is lit.




I have been invited to an op session next Monday so I hope I get a good jump on this to "show and tell".  Stand by for more.  :time:

Reg H
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Great solution.  We are all going to miss Grandt Line.

Reg

Ken C
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Reg

All is not lost with GRANDT Line

https://www.grandtline.com

A new outfit "San Juan Models" has purchased the line with
equipment to be moved to Colorado in Sept.

Reg H
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Ken C wrote: Reg

All is not lost with GRANDT Line

https://www.grandtline.com

A new outfit "San Juan Models" has purchased the line with
equipment to be moved to Colorado in Sept.


That is really good news.

Reg

Steven B
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Gussied-up.
Yes that is a good thing with Grandt, now we just need the same thing to happen with PSC - YIKES!!!


I sat down for a couple of hours today to get some pretties on the ol' girl.  Get her passel of buttons, ribbons and bows.   A few years back I had some decals made up for this project.  Again an attempt to forecast what I needed before I actually knew what I needed.  A classic case of not knowing what I didn't know.  I missed a couple of things, like numbers for the car, but I punted and created a couple of "ones" for her.    I had also put "glass" in the windows.  But I was very dissatisfied with it.  It was old and had seen some scrapes, so it was pretty scratch and clobbered.  I ripped it out.  I have more Evergreen .010 coming tomorrow.  A new package fresh and clean.  Throwing out the old, there wasn't much left. It is hard to see but I shadowed the yellow lettering with red and then again "BAGGAGE" is black and shadowed with red.  Numbers, the same.




I liked the look, but DANG, something was missing.  It was looking a little plain.  It needed some more geegaws to dress her up.  I had been looking at some "old timey" decals for passenger cars but they only came in gold.  Nice if you have an old Pullman Green car, but this ain't that.  What to do.  Besides those decals were like $12 bucks!  And I wouldn't even use half of them!   :hyp:  YIKES!!!  Two YIKES!!! in one day.  It's a rough day.

So I looked through the scads of decal sets that I have and found "Stripes" listed as 1" and 2".  HEY!!!  MicroScale, probably HO, 1"  would be 1/2 (or so) in O Scale.  :brill:  What a great thing.  I had red and black.  Black, forget about it.  But red.... hey that would look nice.  I don't want to too much yeller so I think I'll just stick with red.  I would have to buy some yeller, but I could.  Tell me what you think.  I kind of like it as it sits. I guess it is kind of hard to see in the photo.  But I could make the red shading like in the letters on the letter board, but I don't really think that I want to be repetitive.  




The ends are not finished off yet.  I will assemble the car and fit the roof.  I have to trim out the car so that the roof sits nicely.  I guessed at the arc of the end.  Once that is done then I will decal (it just gets the number) it then.  :java:

Last edited on Mon Jul 16th, 2018 03:12 am by Steven B

W C Greene
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Superb work Steven! Please finish her up, show more photos, and then maybe one being towed by an H & T Ry loco.

Woodie

Ken C
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Steven

From my LHS, PSC has been purchased and is currently being relocated to a site in Washington State.

No idea when the company may be back on line.



Si.
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Hi Steven  :wave:



How's it goin' pardner ?  :cb:  ???



If you've been as busy as me on 'yard-work' at your new place ...

... possibly  :slow:  ly.  ;)



I'm lookin' forward to the winter ! ... Which I think you also said a while back as well.  :P



:cool:



Si.


Steven B
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Not Dead Yet...  :P

Just so as there is no question, I am not.  It's been one heck of a fall, since August really.
Be very careful about what you pray for, it may just come your way. 
I asked for a little financial help, and well my life has been chock full of 60 hour weeks, and one 70 hour week.
 
:Crazy:

I haven't really done much of anything but it is snowing like snowmageddon today. 
So before the CFO roped me into doing some housework (really rebuilding bathroom number 2) I got down to the combine and I had stalled out on the interior. 
I picked up a couple of packages of cheap (being cheaper than the scads of metal figures that I have) Woodland Scenics seated people. 
I started fitting the metal ones first and realized, 1) they can't be seen and 2) they sit too high on the elevated floor of the car. 
So the WS people and the Grandt Coach Seats are getting cut down so that when someone looks through the window, the legs can't be seen.  

Another problem is that the people are DEFINITELY NOT from my time frame.  They must be modified. 
And as I began to modify them I thought... Hey!  I haven't posted in a while, I should share.

[whack]





So I tried to choose people that don't have to be modded too much, a quick project as it is back to work again tomorrow. 
This gal was the one that made me think, I should modify. 
Any respectable lady of the 1880s would cover her skin.  So this little lady needed some sleeves. 
She could be wearing a hat, but maybe she got uncomfortable on the 93 mile ride, so no hat. 
I may build one to sit next to her.  I used Squadron Putty to build up the layers.










Then we had the sleeping man.  He was way too modern and in shirtsleeves - EGADS!
Gave him a hat and a coat as well as a beard. 
When they dry they'll get a little paint in they typical H&T tradition.

 








Thanks for the feedback guys... and yes Woodie, the next project will be a loco. 
But at the rate that I build....:pop:


Si.
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" Hey!  I haven't posted in a while "



Tsk ... tsk ... tsk ...  ;)



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.


Steven B
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All Aboard!

Had a couple of hours today to work on my people.  Got them finished and seated them in car.  I was thinking that maybe I need to find a conductor.  That's down the road.  Next up... lighting.  I am thinking battery to avoid having to deal with trying to draw from the track.  I have to play with it some, but I am thinking this might be a good option. Most certainly it will be some small LEDs like what I used in the Saloon a while back.  I will build up lamps, oil style, so that the people, especially the parson can read.
:us:


Yes, I know that the "saloon" (not the one I built in a tent but a head, ah er... loo?) is not square... but I had messed with it too many times and when I finally got to the point of glueing it in, I realized that it wasn't square and... it didn't fit between the windows.  Ugh.  I glued it anyway, I figured once the roof is on, nobody will see it.  And so my head is misshapen.  Some would have pointed that out before I started this car.  
:dt:




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