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Steven B
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Hi all,
I have been a lurker for over a year, only commenting occasionally.  I have been inspired by so many of you here.  I am in the process of building a layout inspired by the Nevada Central.  I have been a fan for many years, and Mr. Ferrell's fairly recent book was the kick start.
I had a pretty respectable HO layout that was under construction, it too was based in Nevada around Wells, NV and the beginning of the paired track running on the SP/WP to the connection with the Nevada Northern and designed for operations.  But... my wife decided it was time to move near her mother... 2500 miles east.  So down came the layout and I tried to find people in the area who play trains.  Seems that the closest that I can find are an hour or better in any direction.  Hmmm, looks like I am basically YOYO (yer on yer own) for the most part.  There are those who will visit, but construction has to be downsized.  So I upsized to On30.
When I was a child my parents took me to Virginia City, NV and I fell in love with wood burning, ballon stacked American locomotives and drew them constantly with my crayons.  So, On30 represents a regression to my childhood. :bg:  I am all the happier for it.  HO was too small to do this, the locos could hardly pull themselves, so in the words of Goldilocks, "On30 is juuust right."  The NC burned coal, so there there won't be many ballon stacks, ok two.  I refuse to be constricted by history this time and am going freelance with a prototype base.  Meaning that I want to model certain equipment like Carter Bros. and Billmeyer Small, but realize that NOTHING was On30 and that the NC didn't really do anything for operations, so I am mixing it up.  I will model places that may or may not have existed as well as places that were never even close to the NC.  Some of these being Mono Mills on the Bodie Railway,  Brown's Canyon Trestle in the NPC, Ledlie, NV which will have a dock for the "Reese River Navigation Company" (a 1940s lie and pretty funny story - look it up) and Ophir (for my son a huge Goose fan), CO.  Now there was an Ophir on the east side of the Toiyabe's just south east of Austin, true story, think I full of it? (Work speak for "no lie"), so that is where it will be.
Anyway, that is why it will be called the Humboldt & Toiyabe.
The layout will eventually be housed in what I call "Eastern Nevada" a 12x28 shed, and will be double decked.  I have yet to run electricity to it and get all of the stored stuff out of it.  We bought an old farmhouse for my wife and the house is a priority.  Once that is done, Katy bar the door.
In the meantime, I can't sit on my hands.  I have begun work on items for the layout and I hope that this forum will document what I am doing, like so many other great inspirations that I have have been given on this forum.
I have been having problems posting photos.  It seems that my files are too big!:bang:  So I may have to adjust the camera and try again.  Just tried again with the same error message, so I'll get it.  But I wanted to get started, so, here we go! 
Enjoy the ride... "Tickets Please." :pop:









Steven B
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Here we try again to upload a photo or two as an experiment. If it works, then I'll talk about it. 

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Steven B
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Jumpin' Jehosephat!  It worked!  Dang, just like downtown. :shocked: Only issue was that I tried to post two at once.... only one shows.  No worries, I can make more posts if that is what it takes.
So, this is a Deerfield River Laser kit that I picked up to play with.  My goal is to replicate a car similar to the Monterey & Salinas Valley Combine in the California State Railroad Museum.  This one comes closest, without a complete scratch build which I will do someday, but it has nine windows and some frilly engraving to give it a bit of glam.  The prototype saw service not he NC for most of its life and was rebuilt to a seven window car later.  I got half way into the kit and decided that I could do it differently, so I'll get another and do it the way that I think I should have from the start.
Not sure what I will do with this one, but the kit and instructions were great.  It went together easily and smoothly.  It fit right over the Bachamnn frame without a hitch.  I added some seats from another car because it was short in the seating section.
In the next one, I will completely redo the interior with Grandt Seats some people and a little freight.  But I am so happy that I could make the photos load.  I have other things to post, but they will have to wait until I get a little time to retake pictures of them at a smaller format.  Yippee skippy we're on our way . :glad:

Herb Kephart
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Congratulations,  Steven!!

With all the different combinations of Server, IP, browser--etc, it's a magical that anything works anymore.

"Fix it again, it still works"


Herb, Head Luddite

Steven B
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No kidding Herb!  I have stuff lined up for pictures.  If I get a day where the wind doesn't blow everything down the hill, I'll get some images up... one at a time!

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Hi Steven :wave:


Lookin' good !


It should be possible for you to 'resize' your existing photos, using software.


For example, I believe you can do this with Microsoft 'Paint' which comes as standard with most versions of Windows.


If 'resized' to 800x--- ( looks like you are 4:3 ratio on the coach photo, so 800x600 ) which we recommend ...


... the photo SHOULD then be under 0.5 MegaBytes in size & can be Posted on Freerails.


It's worth figuring out the 'resizing' thing, since only 1 lot of hi-rez photos need be taken.


All the best.


:moose:


Si.

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As might be said at NASA, "You are cleared to go YOYO."
Equipment from that era makes for good looking trains when well kept.

Bill U
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Steve B where are you located? After 10 years in Nevada we retired to our beach house in Ocean View Delaware in 2014. I chased the NG railroads and early SG all over Nevada and eastern California during those 10 years so I know what you are up to. There are more model railroaders and On3ers in the area than you think.

Bill Uffelman

Steven B
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Thanks Si, I dunno, the mosheens are furrin to me.  I tried to figure this out a year ago, and it has been killing me to get this up and running.  I see so many great modelers here, this is a great forum.  :bow:
Bytes bite.  I'm like Herb, I am lucky I can just get on line somedays.  I use a MAC so I don't have Paint.  But there has to be sumpthin on this thing that does it.  I found that if I made my camera take small low res images I could do it.  That made my day.  I know on my old MS machine I could compress, I tried it here and it was still too big. I'm not a fast learner, not a slow learner, kind of half fast. :slow:
I just have to play with it and eventually I'll just keep pushing buttons until it works or breaks!  Thanks, and I'll see what I can find.  Maybe I'll get some sun tomorrow with a slow enough wind speed that I won't have to pick my models up in Richmond when I try to photograph them. :f:

Steven B
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Forrest, that was my thought too.  Short trains too!  Make layouts look bigger!

Steven B
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Hi Bill, I have met a few and we get together occasionally.  Each is about an hour from here.  I live in the Blue Ridge about an hour east of Roanoke.  Speaking of which we have a meet the first Saturday in April.  It's called the Great Eastern Divide.  I'm about the only western guy there!
I work summers, well April-December and am dying to get to some of the other NG meets that I have heard of, as well as getting to places like Timonium or Amherst.  
There are some great explorations out there in NV and Eastern CA.  I've had a love of mining and railroads forever.  I hope to really interpret the operations of such places in my models.  Industrial archeology I guess.

Steven B
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Hi All-
The weather has not cooperated very well, but I managed to get a few pictures of one of my projects.  This was last year's big project.  I have been disposing of my HO fleet and I needed to DO SOMETHING to get the creative juices flowing.  So I found these wall kits on eBay and picked up one that looked something like I would find in 1880s Nevada.  Because I can't leave well enough alone, I modified the walls and added an awning based on ones that I have seen in restored California Gold Rush Towns.  So what should it be? L:

Like Doug in Updah Creek, I had some fellas who are hard working miners and to tell the truth, they don't like looking' too rough.  So some quick research yielded Austin Baths. Now this establishment shared a building as close as I can figure and changed owners and locations a few times, but it lasted a good 20 years, from the ads in the Reese River Reveille.  So the Austin Baths and Hair Saloon (can't have enough saloons in a silver town!) was born.;)

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Steven B
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The Austin Baths advertised "steam and water baths".  I hand lettered the doors in keeping with the period tradition.:cool:

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Steven B
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Now why'd it do that?  I guess you gotta walk in sideways, maybe be a little sideways to let Floyd shave you?

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Steven B
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Did up the interior too.  Found some nice details from Berkshire Valley, and some cheap stuff on eBay.  Searched high and low, not so high and sober for a barbers chair, love the one in Updah, but I ended up just putting a smock on Freddie while he got his cut.:us:

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Steven B
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You can see the steam room and the bath tub... after all both "steam and water baths" are advertised.  I added a curtain to give a feller in the tub some privacy.  I haven't put the chimneys for the stoves on yet, 'cause they'll just get broken before the layout is built.:!:
Not that I have had that happen before or anything.  The roof is shingles from Builders in Scale.  I also put an sm LED in it to give it a glow at night.  One of my buddies said, "Nobody can see in there anyway. " I replied, "But I know what's in there.":)


That's what we got for today.  My next project, the one on the bench now is coming along great and I hope to start writing about it soon.

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Bill U
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Very nice!

Bill Uffelman

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Very nicely done Steven. The interior is very well conceived with the spittoon and the smock on the customer and some day I must try your brick, stone and plaster exterior style. On NGRM Online (and sometimes on here), Daniel Caso gives a regular master-class in scribing foam material with the buildings he produces and it would be interesting to hear how you went about getting your excellent result.

Steven B
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Thank you guys, I appreciate your comments.  Doug, I didn't carve this building.  The walls came from a fellow who offers kits in California.  You can find him on eBay.  This was his "Assay Office."  I decided to diverge because I lacked a brick chimney for the actual "assay" process. ???
However, I did, change the side walls and rear corners to "interlock" them.  I felt that if I had assembled the kit as designed, the walls would fall down.  So I brought in some stone masons and they rebuilt the building using some more bricks and stone.;)
All I did was fill in some of the block lines with plaster and "recarve" rock into the sides.  I did the same on the rear corners to make corners that interlocked.  I changed the capstones to brick as well, I didn't want the facade and dental cornicing falling on someone if the door slammed shut!  I did this with a metal ruler and a dental pick, slowly scribing the bricks to try and match the size of the dental cornicing on the front.  It was tough going trying to hold everything while doing this and there are irregularities
I had some chips when I did this and have since learned that :!:I can get it a little wet and it goes easier.  The chips didn't bother me too much because the building is supposed to represent a building built 20 years or so earlier.  The railroad was a late arrival in my world.  In future projects, not that I know how get images up on this site, I hope to document the steps a little better.  I like how you have done that, Doug, and that was the impetus for me to try and do the same.
Thank you again!

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Thanks for the very clear explanation Steven and your "adaptations" have certainly worked well. I use Flickr to host all my photos and it's a doddle getting them into the posts. I just

select the photo
select the share (bent arrow) symbol
select BBCode and then size (I choose Medium 800 x 600 or thereabouts) from the drop down box below
copy the code on the blue box and
paste that into the post.

Simples!

Last edited on Tue Feb 21st, 2017 01:01 pm by slateworks

Steven B
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Thanks Doug, I have to say, I am a Luddite and really have problems with this here computer crap.  :bang:   Not my cuppa tea.  I am lucky somedays just to sign on.  Here is a try at this flickr stuff.  I'm not seeing all the neat stuff that you outline.  If this works, then we'll talk about it.  If it doesn't then I'll save it for the one photo posts.  Here goes nuthin'.

33002246846_fb79d51e89_b.jpg
33002324066_b9e9b74e41_b.jpg32228844693_571d0c0144_b.jpg33043916115_afd593cfed_b.jpg

Steven B
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Ok so that was a bust.  I'll do it the hard way later.  grrrr:f:

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Hi Steven


The 'sideways' picture attachment is actually fine

Sometimes 'smart' phone type cameras dont know which way up they are

So images can appear sideways

You often see it online since 'smart' phones were invented


I'm sticking with my DynaTAC !


:f:


Eddie

W C Greene
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I wish that I knew or help out with posting photos. I use the Freerails gallery here and it works every time, except when MicroS$%%T "updates" some computer crap that goofs with my program...but I digress. I don't know a thing about smart phones, I phones, pole phones or any other doo dad like that but my po' old laptop gets me to the gallery and if I have the photo(s) on my desktop, it will send them to the gallery, thence to any posts. One click without any http//234567$%^^&.com BS. I encourage all to try the gallery, it beats the hell outta Photobucket and the others.

Woodie-Luddite DeLuxe

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Well, thank you Woodie, seems that you were one of the few who didn't have an issue with the Gallery gone missing.  I changed my color and now I think that I can do this!

Oh My!  Look it worked!  :glad:
Whatever shall I do?!!!  So, now I can do this the easy way.  :shocked:
So this is my latest project.  I am building a tent saloon for a camp.  Placer gold was being discovered in many places, in what would many call a "late" timeframe.  Most people associate placer or free gold with the California Gold Rush, where miners panned and used water to wash the gold from the sands and gravels of stream beds and ancient rivers.

Nevada was no different.  The Comstock was actually discovered by the Grolsch (think I spelled that right... probably not, I am too lazy to look it up) brothers in 1859, about the same time they were panning Clear Creek in Colorado.  Manhattan, NV was also a large placer operation as was Oseola, NV among others.  My story is this, while the railroad was building up the Toiyabes in 1881, the grade builders unearthed a large sand bar loaded with free gold on Big Creek and a rush began.  While there were mines up in this area, they didn't last long and were most likely prospects, but in my world, the area exploded.

Tent towns were built throughout the "wild west" mining days of Nevada all the way up into the 1920 at Leadfield outside of Death Valley.  Places like Rawhide, Manhattan and others began as tent towns, mostly centered around a few merchants and of course as many saloons as could be mustered.   You can search UNR archives on line and many tents pop up, and many tent saloons are the subject matter.

The Star Spangled Banner is a hat tip to some friends of mine from back in my historic interpretive days.  But, in the photos that I found, there were many saloons and businesses that just painted their signs right on the canvas.
I was sitting in a pizza restaurant one night during the time that I was envisioning this project and we were given napkins by the waitress, and BAM! these were perfect for O Scale heavy canvas :thumb:, so I asked for a couple of more... she obliged.  I left a big tip!  I commenced to build the floor and framework out of styrene, distressing it and using a myriad of acrylic colors to make the "wood" feel like wood.  I cut and wrapped my new found canvas on the structure and painted it a thinned "sand".  I use thread for the ropes and gave the whole thing a wash of very thinned black.  

It is the Star Spangled Banner, so my story is Antone is the owner and keep, came 'round the horn in '50 to try his luck in the mines.  He struck out as a miner, but was able to get a job at a restaurant in Sacramento.  He quickly became the head cook, and there was a rumor, which he refuses to confirm or deny that he used to work in DelMonico's.  Never-the-Less, he was successful enough to open his own restaurant and made a small pile.  His partner, Carson, tried to talk him into going to San Francisco, this was about the time of the Washoe excitement, and he opted for adventure instead.  Packed up his pots and pans, and his beloved bar and back bar (also shipped 'round the horn in '57) and headed off.  

Washoe was just what he wanted and just about the time things got routine, he lit out for White Pine and ran a place on Treasure Hill.  When that petered out he headed to Austin and worked there for a time, always restless.  Then... Big Creek just over yonder, exploded, being so close, he was about the first on scene.  The SSB is his latest.  Always loving the American dream and being able to be as successful as he was willing to work, he fostered a deep love of American History and has collected a number of prints of historical note.  One, his favorite, being the copy of Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze (1851), the second is one of General Grant (before all the messiness of President Grant). He also has collected some copies of some "traditional" saloon art for his patrons who demand it.  You will notice that President Garfield is dropped in black crepe.  It is late September, and he has just been assassinated.  Antone is deep mourning, he liked Garfield's policies and doesn't feel that Chester Arthur is up to the task.  "We shall see," he says.

Here we are at the beginning of this project.  Antone has plans to build an addition for cooking food.  Right now he is serving up pork, beans and biscuits as that is all he has time to cook with building the establishment.
More to come!  Thanks Woodie for getting me into the Gallery.  It was a tough find!:cool:

Last edited on Mon Feb 27th, 2017 10:37 pm by Steven B

Steven B
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First the bar.  The bar is a little more elegant than many pictured in tent saloons.  I built it piece by piece basing it loosely on one that I used to sling beers on in Columbia, California. While many bars did not have a brass foot rail, this came "'round the Horn."

This is the bar I scratch built it from Evergreen.  I found it easy to bend the thin parts.  I would glue one side, let it dry and then glue it to the other side, like a veneer and then over laid it with trim.  I did the rail the same way.


You can see the construction on the bottom that I did not paint.


I built it to detail the back, but I am not sure that I will do that, nobody will be able to see it... not even a little bit.

Steven B
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The back bar I wanted to be ornate.  I had a couple of greco-roman columns from my HO days that have been languishing in a parts box.  There was this very nice back bar in Sonora, California that I thought might be black walnut.  It was DARK.  And... it had two columns.  There you go...



The base was two el cheapo parts from 1/48 dollhouse set.  I think they were supposed to be side boards. I filed one side of each and glued them together.  Bammo, now I needed a mirror.  I liked Doug's mirror in his barbershop so I ordered up some "BareMetal" Chrome and cut it to fit, finished out the top and there you have it, a back bar.  I added a beer barrel with a tap.  
Keep in mind this is "steam" beer.  Your history lesson - Steam beer is a western tradition.  and is basically a lager style of beer, that is brewed and stored in "warm" conditions.  "Lager" means "to store."  Lagers were stored in cool to cold places in the east and Germany.  This was a challenge in the west.  So it was brewed like a lager but was much more excitable because of the temperature.  There is no real reason that can be found as to why it was called "steam beer" except that it developed a better head due to the temperature situation.  It had a pressure like steam.  When tapped the tap was driven into the keg with a hammer.  For the uninitiated who stayed at the bar, they could get a dousing of suds.  Lo the bar keep who missed!  Steam Beer was killed by the 18th Amendment.  Today there is only one "Steam Beer" as the name was trademarked by a San Francisco brewer.  However!  We brewed a "western" beer on numerous occasions.  It was bottled and lacked the excitement of a wooden keg.



Antone, loves his bar and back bar.


More later as I progress.  Thanks for looking!

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Good stuff Steven. Now you want lots of bright coloured liquor bottles to go with the barrel. I see the bar-keep's already found one.

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Very nice! That's a real saloon you are building.

Woodie

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Don't forget the shotgun under the counter...
Jose.

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Steam beer, I learned yet another new thing here! :)

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Thanks Guys!  Yes, I've researched a few saloons. ;)   I have some bottles from Stewart Dollhouses.  I will be working them up.  And, yes Jose... I have a scatter gun!:cb:  Thank you very much, I'm working up some more stuff and hope to have more in the next few days.  This posting is fun!

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Steven B wrote:  

Oh My!  Look it worked!  :glad:


GREAT work, how'd you do the seams in the 'canvas'? Did you just alow for the paint to dry to harden and make the shape hold?
I would love to make a few WW2 'wall' tents, using you methods!

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Hi Lee, I think WWII walls would be a bit easier on the framework.  It was easy, sewing 1A, but with CA not thread.  I figured out what size I wanted and I sketched a pattern basically like the one below.  I cut out the pattern and lightly traced it on the napkin material.  I cut the ends out of the material that I used with a razor blade.  I then measured the length of the middle (roof and walls), cut it out.

I folded the roof & walls in half for the ridge, then folded it again to create the walls.  Then I folded the "tabs" on the front and back to 90 degrees and CAed the tabs to the wall and roof sections accordingly.  Bango, you've got the wall tent.  You can then wash it OD to make it military.  Easy peasy.  Obviously with your other hobby you are familiar with the framing of a wall tent.  Good to go.  If you need further clarification, just ask.
 

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Antone has been busy.  Had a freighter come up from Austin and brought a load of refreshments, Champagne, Kentucky Bourbon, Sazarac, and more beer.  There were even seegars!  :mex:


The bar was stocked, a pail of wash water brought in, a clean towel and extra cases of Sarsaparilla and Champagne were stowed underneath.  And yes, Jose, there is a piece ready for come what may.


I didn't fill the shelves, I would have put glasses there, but there is no way anyone could see them.  They would be an invisible version of Lee's corn...$$$$.




Open for business!

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Steven B wrote:





























They would be an invisible version of Lee's corn...$$$$.





I'm sure the Ensor ladies over at the corn field on my layout would be just fine with some of the product of their Victory garden being transported back in time for such a use. My layout takes place where there were a lot of moonshiners, so they can appreciate good, "corn squeezins'" as well as the residents of your layout!

That is amazing work. I'd award you a veritable herd of moose for that, but somehow I'm having problems adding emoticons to my posts, in any of the board themes...
By the way, where did the bottles come from? They look amazing!





Last edited on Fri Feb 24th, 2017 06:46 pm by Lee B

slateworks
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Great stuff Steve. it's looking real user friendly now.

pipopak
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Congrats!. Great model!
Jose.

Steven B
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Thank you very much guys. 
Lee, the bottles come from two sources, the first is like your cornfield and are 3D printed, this also gave us the beer mugs and glasses.  It is called Stewart Dollhouse Creations, they are on the web.  The second, where the barrels and boxes also came from is Black Dog, a military modelers source.  I have bought these off eBay and they are 1/48.  For most of the bottles I searched out labels from my many years of saloon research and used authentic labels, some are too big, but printing them any smaller would make them blobs on paper.  The Stewart bottles some with some labels if you don't want to search.  But it used to be my job to find this stuff and recreate 1:1 scale.
So let's get this thing started, some of the locals are just getting in and are finding the selection rather nice.


Let's take a look inside, shall we?



Looks like business is picking up.  Antone's wife, Juanita, is helping out with the clientele.

Steven B
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William McIntosh, has come in to camp to buy some flour and other needed provisions for he and Patty Karnahan working their claim on Big Creek.  He stopped in to have a small draught and ran into Johan "Slim" Chance.  Slim is about the tallest feller in camp and skinny as a bean pole, but he likes his beer after washing gravel all day.  Antone is putting up a new stock of Kentucky Bourbon just in from the Transcontinental railway.

Elliot and the boys have taken up a game of cards to while away the afternoon.  Being up this high the sun can be very brutal and the mid afternoon can wear a man down, so many wait until a little later to resume work, when the steep canyon starts to shade the diggin's again.  Elliot is a bit of a cheat, his partners aren't quite yet aware of this.  I didn't model a regular saloon game because space was tight.  I have a larger more permanent building that I will interpret the leased space games like Pharo or Monte.

Charlie Wilson has just come into the saloon for supper, he took a cup of coffee, and has asked Juanita for a shot of something a bit stronger.  Jack Moore never bothered to wash a pan today.  He had a very good day yesterday and has been in the saloon since last night, he is barely on his feet now, and is quite nearly falling down.

Being at nearly 7000', as warm as it is during the day, it gets pretty chilly at night, and Antone brought his stove.  He remembers well the nights on Treasure Hill in White Pine, and swore that he would never be without heat again.  He sewed wool strips around the hole in the tent for the stove pipe to keep it from catching fire.  As much as he likes the camps, he knows that fire can be the death of them, so he fashioned a sandbox underneath the stove to catch cinders too.  That's all from Big Creek for now.  The next wagon hopefully will bring Antone's lamps that he ordered.  The candles scare him, especially when Jack gets in his cups.

Steven B
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You light up my life...

While we haven't filled the reservoirs or trimmed the wicks, we got the lights hung!  I am using SMD LEDs that are yellow to stave off the "blue" or "incandescent" glow.  I know that this isn't my idea, I saw this somewhere and have spent the last 1/2 hour looking for where I got the idea.  Might have been Doug's but I can't seem to find it.  I want to give credit where credit is due, so if anyone knows where this came from, please post and take the credit.
How did I build mine, I started with the following: 0.12 brass wire, a couple of jewelry beads from a local craft store, an SMD LED, and earring back, and a couple of drills.

Next I enlarged the hole in the earring back with a drill bit, then took a rat tail file to it until it fit the conical plastic bead, so that the bead just struck through, then I drilled two #76 holes across from each other on the earring back.




Then I glued the conical bead to the hole.

In the other little silver bead, I drilled two #80 holes across from each other. I then bent some of the 0.12 wire around a fatter paintbrush.



Here glued the ends of two pieces of 0.12 wire into those holes, keep the wire somewhat long.  I used two pieces of long wire. 

I fed the LED through the fat end of the conical bead, DON'T pull too hard, don't ask me why, but there were at least 3 choice words chains used!  Then feed the two 0.12 wires through the holes on the sides.



Get the wires centered, I didn't push the chimney all the way down thinking that maybe I'll get more light that way.  The gap is about 1/32.  The bring the brass wires together and twist a couple of times.  Secure the shade and twist with a little CA.  I left a tail on one of the brass wires to hang the lamp.  I will run the electrical wires over the ridge and down behind the bar when I next get time to work on it.  Baddabing! Kerosene lights.

slateworks
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Super lamps Steve. I like the use of jewellery beads. I used them for the lit globes in Updah's gas station pumps.

W C Greene
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Yes, really nice lamps! Ahhh, the jewelry section at the local "craft" store...That's where my links & pins are found for my couplers. And phone pole insulators, and power line insulators, and......so on. It pays to look everywhere you go, I have even found "details" at the grocery store.

Woodie
Again, the lamps are great, I will purloin your methods also.

Reg H
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W C Greene wrote: Yes, really nice lamps! Ahhh, the jewelry section at the local "craft" store...That's where my links & pins are found for my couplers. And phone pole insulators, and power line insulators, and......so on. It pays to look everywhere you go, I have even found "details" at the grocery store.

Woodie
Again, the lamps are great, I will purloin your methods also.

I once was complimented by a nice lady that it was considerate of me to accompany my wife to the craft store.
Hunh?
Reg

Lee B
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Steven B wrote: Lee, the bottles come from two sources, the first is like your cornfield and are 3D printed, this also gave us the beer mugs and glasses.  It is called Stewart Dollhouse Creations, they are on the web.  The second, where the barrels and boxes also came from is Black Dog, a military modelers source.






Thanks, Steven! I just looked up the first
website and they do have a lot of stuff. The bottles aren’t cheap but it’s
something hardly anyone models. I’d love to scatter a few ‘empties’ around the
layout, for people to find.




As for my cornfield, that isn’t 3D printed.
They’re individual stalks, made from wire, plastic and paper (I think) by JTT
Scenics: http://www.jttmicroscale.com/viewcategory.asp?DirID=162 I bought a
pack of them every time I was at the (somewhat) local hobby shop and/or Hobby
Lobby, stockpiling them over time. There are just about exactly 400 of them in
that field, each one hand-placed in tight rows.

Steven B
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Thanks guys.  This has been fun.  And I am no where near done.  But my time is running short before I have to go back to work.  I have to pay for this hobby somehow.
My wife accompanied me to the craft store.  I think she is my ticket to get in.  There is some kind of secret handshake or something, I certainly know how she feels when she goes to the train store!
Lee, 400 stalks!  See what I mean about bottles.... bottles - corn all very expensive, but very cool details.  This was why I had to put lighting in this thing.  :)  Be sure to through a few of those bottles down the outhouse!  Maybe in a few years we can dig 'em up and make some money :bg: to pay for them.
I knew that I had seen the idea somewhere Doug, thank you.
I hope to work quite a bit more next week.  I am trying to finish it for the "Great Divide Meet" in Roanoke in April.
Steve

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I've been back to work for a while now.  I don't get to model much if at all.  It was 69 days before I got my first few hours off... whew.  But, I read all of the new posts and model vicariously through y'all.

I was looking through some photos and found some that I thought would make a great story and allow me to share some of my work done last year... This is the story of Reuel C. Gridley and the Sanitary Sack of Flour.



Reuel was chronicled by none other than the fabulous Mark Twain in Roughing It.  You see Mr. Gridley ran for mayor of Austin, Nevada in 1864.  Mr. Gridley, a resident of "Upper" Austin, was the Democratic candidate and he made a bet with the Republican candidate that the looser would carry a 50 pound sack of flour from one residence to the other.  Mr. Gridely lost the election (and the bet) and thus was to carry the sack.
To much fanfare, a band to accompany him, and a lively crowd, Mr. Gridley set off with the sack of flour on his shoulder.  When he had reached his destination he made the decision to auction it off as a benefit to the United States Sanitary Commission.  This was a forerunner of the American Red Cross during the American Civil War.  So with quite rowdy bidding the bag fetched a resounding $250!  When asked where the man who won it wanted it delivered, he cried, "Auction it again!"  The crowd grew and grew, fueled by drink and the excitement of the moment.  And, so the lowly sack was auctioned over and over 300 times until the bag had raised over $8000 and the sun had set.:rah:


The Gridley store still stands and it will be modeled eventually.
When word reached Virginia City, he was invited to sell it there.  When he arrived and the auction ended, the metropolis was humiliated, raising a mere $5,000, much less than the dramatically smaller city of Austin.  A call went out and the auction resumed the next day in Gold Hill down the road from Virginia.  When the first bid came in the morning, the Yellow Jacket Mine opened with a $1000 bid.  By the time everything was done and Virginia finally got back into the picture $40,000 dollars had been raised.  Twain claims this was about $3 for every man, woman and child in the Comstock.:2t:

Gridley was asked to tour California and the rest of the United States.  He ended up raising over $275,000, a massive sum in that era.  When he returned to Austin, his business was in ruins and he was ill.  He and his family moved to Stockton, California nearly penniless.  When it was found that he was destitute, $1400 was raised to buy him a small house and a small farm.  He died in 1871 and is buried today in Stockton.  In this day of division, I thought that I would share the story of Reuel to show that politics can, if allowed, be good natured and come to a classy resolution.  ;) 
I model a time 10 years after the passing of Mr. Gridley, but... who am I to stand in the way of a good story?  I mentioned on another forum about how I modified my western fighters by removing their guns and employing them in more peaceful pursuits.  This was the example that I found.  This fellow was carrying a shotgun and a hog leg on his hip, I removed all of them, repositioned his arm and added a sack.



The photo at the beginning shows Mr. Gridley in dark trousers, but I wanted him to be a little more vibrant so I gave him some plaid trousers.  The figure also got a beard, the fighter did not have one.  I then painted him to be my version of Mr. Gridley.  I am looking forward to getting him a store someday soon.  I think that I have some fellows for a band and I know that I have people to cheer him on.

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Hi Steven :wave:

Great stuff as usual !

:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:

Si.


Steven B
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Thanks Si, you are quite generous with moosies!  I have more but I have to search photos in my down time.  If time allows I'll get some more cool stuff up this week.

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Well I got home for a couple of hours today.  Not for great reasons, had a broken pipe in the bathroom. Argh... fortunately insurance will ease the pain.

Delays in getting the house done for the CFO have necessitated the storage of household items in "Eastern" Nevada.  The broken pipe just pushes out "ground breaking" on the H&T Rwy.  :time: But the CFO must have her house before the railroad can be brought to fruition (the stuff stored out in Nevada awaits... and the RR waits).  We are working on a 1940 farmhouse and it has had its challenges for certain, the broken pipe moving up the bathroom remodel, and putting the dining room on hold.  Sigh.

At any rate there was advancement in the last month, the Rural Lectrikfrication Act got us lektrik out to our new railway house (thanks to a buddy).  Look at the beautiful conduit bringing 60 amps to our operation! :!: Of course now I have to wire, insulate, rock, light and hook up the panel.  Not to mention getting that STUFF that belongs in the house out of Nevada.  I think of those old wagon trains abandoning their stuff as they moved across the Great Basin... that's what my RR building has in it... abandoned stuff.  Looks like I need to weed whack too... sheesh all this extra stuff just to get 'em rolling.  It's a helluva way to run a railroad.

Steven B
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Hey everyone!  
I am finally back home!  I left my former employment (_!_) and that is what I think of that.

I have some time to model again, in between rebuilding the CFOs house and getting a late summer garden in.  I think everyone is happy.
I have been motivated to get a project off the ground.  I need a small project that can easily be moved.  


This image and another come from Railroad in the Sky by Wanda & Richard Canton through the Friends of Bodie Railway & Lumber Company.  I have loved the Mono Basin forever. Bodie is a part of that.  My lumbering portion of the layout will be based on the Bodie Railway & Lumber Company.
I am also a huge fan of the Jeffrey Pine.  For those unfamiliar, the Jeffrey is kin to the Ponderosa, grows pretty big and when the wind blows through them they waft a wonderful vanilla smell that you will never forget.  To tell a Jeffrey from a Ponderosa, put your nose in the bark and sniff!  The Jeffrey was the primary tree cut and milled by the BR&LC.  Through the help of the book and the FBR&LC I found Dan Kieft of Oregon who has made extensive drawings of the BR&LC equipment, facilities, and structures.  To him I am grateful and this project was his latest drawing.
The hardest part is modeling the chassis.  The photos of this caboose are vague and fuzzy at best.  It obviously had pedestal mounts for two axles and was spartan at best.  Aside from trying to adapt an HO scale bobber, I thought I might try to modify Grandt Line C&S pedestal mounts to fit.  
There were no springs on the cab like the GL mounts, so I omitted them and built a "block" and rubber cushion style system that were prevalent in the early days of railroading.  I did this by mounting strip styrene to the inside of the pedestal.  I then took a piece of styrene tube and cut it to fit.  It is a little tall, but I think it is acceptable.  The frame will also sit higher than the drawing, but I would like to use IMRC Semi-scale 36" wheels which will be about 18" and bring the car height down to what I think will be acceptable for the look.
While I am a rivet counter in recovery, the "look" and "flavor" are important to me.  


I don't know, but I think due to the lack of detailed pictures Mr. Kieft was vague with the under frame.  This allows me to "make it up" and use conjecture to build it the way that it will work for operations.


I will probably shave off the "C&S" casting marks as these were most likely cast by the Virginia & Truckee's Carson City shops.  This may not be visible anyway when I am done, but details sometimes matter.  As I build the frame I may find that the IMRC wheels don't work the way that I hope... this is a build and fit as I go project.L:
So much for now, it is sure good to be back.

Herb Kephart
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Steven

Under certain circumstances, telling the boss to "shove it" is the thing to do. Working under conditions that make you consider quitting is bad for the health and spirit.

Glad to see you are back. Do you know where Jeffery pine seedlings can be obtained? Haven't done an extensive search myself, and unless they grow about 3 foot a year I won't get to see them as mature trees, but the kids will. Might not be cold enough in Pennsylvania.

Model on!!!!!!!

Herb

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I was fortunate that the last job I would ever have (outside of stuff that I do for myself), I was able to tell the boss off and give him the "finger salute". And after all that, he wanted me to come back for "the holidays"! Whatta maroon!

On the hack's wheel pedestals...the old photos are fuzzy (and OK for modeling) and I don't believe that there are any folks alive who could pick nit the plan you have. Besides, pickers love to tell others what to do while they sit on their butts and don't (or won't) build anything.
Now, whar's that scale ruler...somewhere around here...
Woodie

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Welcome home, Steven:

I have had a couple of those jobs myself. 

It seems the real cure is to become the boss.  Not an option for everybody.  And it sure makes telling the boss to "stuff it" difficult.   :)

Your theme looks both intriguing and challenging.  

Reg

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Hey guys,  I don't know where Jeffreys can be obtained.  I imagine that they can be found on the inner tube.  Probably Amazon, they have everything.  I know that we planted a few when we lived out in CA.  We lived near Yosemite and they seemed to be doing ok, but that was years ago.  Yes, they like it cold and well drained Sierra soil.  Not sure if they could make it in PA.  But if you ever get out there to the east side, do make it a point to seek these out.  Late afternoon breeze is a plus.  I hear they built a kiosk at the old Mono Mill site just off US 395.  We used to camp there with the boys when there was nothing to mark it.  Found the turntable foundation and all kinds of cool stuff.  Even took pictures with us to locate the buildings.

I have been thinking of starting something of my own.  But I wonder if that would be akin to representing yourself in court.  "If you represent yourself, you have a fool for an attorney" kind of thing.  And truthfully, if I did do that, I think the boss would understand if I told him to take a flying leap.  :cool:  He is tough to work for and knows it.  But I am old enough now not to care and at this point becoming rich is a pipe dream.  I'll be happy with enough to finish the lady's house and build a layout while watching my fruit trees come in.  

Worked a bit on the under frame tonight and will post more photos when I get some real progress.  I am kind building it "from the hip."  Using typical car fabrication ideas and making changes to suit the photos to some degree.  So it is taking a bit of time to flesh it out.  The pedestals are really very tall, even with the HO 36" wheels.  I might have to put more than one step on the platform.  :f:  I'll play with it some more.  Thanks for watching!


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