Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Narrow Gauge > Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II
 Moderated by: . Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  ...  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Jul 24th, 2017 11:40 am
  PMQuoteReply
141st Post
darrylhuffman
Registered
 

Joined: Thu Jul 10th, 2008
Location: Star, Idaho USA
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline
Brian paints the inside of the walls with different colored felt tip pens.
As the only part of the "bottle" that is seen is the bottom, this is one way to make walls.
Draw your walls on a sheet of clear styrene.
Glue short lengths of clear styrene rod to the wall.
The rods can be of different sizes if desired.
Build a dam of wood around your wall.
Pour plaster into the wall mold up to the top of the styrene.
When set, simply remove the wooden dam and you have a plaster wall with clear "bottles" embedded.

Trim the excess sheet of sytrene away from the casting.
Paint the inside of the clear wall with colored markers.
You can buy flickering, battery powered "candles" for the inside of the cabin.



____________________
Darryl Huffman
451 N Evelyn Way
Star, ID 83669

The search for someone else to blame is always successful.

http://ghosttownmodels.blogspot.com/
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jul 24th, 2017 07:05 pm
  PMQuoteReply
142nd Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 1208
Status: 
Offline
Thanks Darryl.  Sounds fairly straightforward.  I'll have to give it a go!



____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Jul 30th, 2017 07:48 pm
  PMQuoteReply
143rd Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 1208
Status: 
Offline
Corrugated iron.  Maybe I missed it, but when using corrugated iron how is the peak of a roof handled.  I was thinking that the builders cut short pieces of corrugated iron and bent them to cover the peak.  But, that almost sounds too simple.  Was there some special way this was handled?



____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Jul 30th, 2017 10:26 pm
  PMQuoteReply
144th Post
darrylhuffman
Registered
 

Joined: Thu Jul 10th, 2008
Location: Star, Idaho USA
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline
Michael, that is one way to do it.
Manufacturers of the iron sheets also made "caps" available for the roof.



____________________
Darryl Huffman
451 N Evelyn Way
Star, ID 83669

The search for someone else to blame is always successful.

http://ghosttownmodels.blogspot.com/
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Jul 30th, 2017 10:27 pm
  PMQuoteReply
145th Post
darrylhuffman
Registered
 

Joined: Thu Jul 10th, 2008
Location: Star, Idaho USA
Posts: 58
Status: 
Offline
Michael,
Do a Google search for:
metal roof caps
and you will find examples of such caps made today.
They were like that in the old days as well.



____________________
Darryl Huffman
451 N Evelyn Way
Star, ID 83669

The search for someone else to blame is always successful.

http://ghosttownmodels.blogspot.com/
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jul 31st, 2017 02:26 am
  PMQuoteReply
146th Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 1208
Status: 
Offline
Well, that was simple.  Apparently there are dozens (100s) of ways to cap a roof.

I just wanted to make sure before I went and put a metal roof on a little station I'm building.



____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jul 31st, 2017 06:02 am
  PMQuoteReply
147th Post
Keith Pashina
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Nov 4th, 2012
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
Posts: 733
Status: 
Offline
There has been a lot of great info shared about corrugated iron and bottle houses lately - thanks everyone! Unfortunately, I have not seen any buildings clad with bottles in Gilpin County, but as the sayings go: "There's a prototype for everything" and "It's my (model) railroad", so, we can do what we want.  

The most recent posts talked about capping the roof peak on corrugated iron. I checked some photos I had taken in the Gilpin Tram area, and it looks like some had end caps from either shortened pieces or pre-made, and others just bent over part of the sheet. Here are 3 examples I could find:



This shows the simple bent-over roofing cap on the Quartz Hill Mine. That's Mike Pyne and Joe Crea, and no, they didn't knock it over! They found it that way, and are measuring up the remains - this eventually led to the Wild West Scale Models kit of this building




The Prompt Pay Mine near Russell Gulch also has a simple bent-over cap


This shows the Gold Collar Mine near Gunnell Hill. I can't tell what the cap on the peak is, but it is rather small, whatever it is. Also, this photo is a good reference for me for weathered wood colors


This summer has been very busy, and my posts on Gilpin Tram stuff has tapered off as a result. But, I have gotten caught up on some things, and will be posting more soon.
Keith




Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jul 31st, 2017 06:16 am
  PMQuoteReply
148th Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 1208
Status: 
Offline
Since there seems to be a variety of ways to cap a roof I'm just going to cut some short pieces, bend them over, and glue it down.

For whatever reason I was thinking that it might have been handled some special way.  It appears that the builders of these structures just kept it simple.



____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jul 31st, 2017 09:23 am
  PMQuoteReply
149th Post
oztrainz
Super Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 10th, 2013
Location: Unanderra, Australia
Posts: 931
Status: 
Online
Hi Michael,
To keep this a bit quarantined, have a look at http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=7872&forum_id=19&jump_to=95212#p95212 

Flat ridge capping is so much easier in model form - .005" to .010" styrene strips can be folded on a steel rule to make runs of ridge capping. Trim to the required length. 

This is the roof on the tipple house in 1/43rd scale for my Corrimal Colliery Incline layout. 
Please put some photos up when you are working on your building,



____________________
Regards,
John Garaty
Unanderra in oz
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jul 31st, 2017 05:58 pm
  PMQuoteReply
150th Post
Michael M
Registered


Joined: Thu Jan 26th, 2017
Location: San Bernardino, California USA
Posts: 1208
Status: 
Offline
Thanks for that link.  Gotta love all that rust!

I'll post a photo or two once I get some weathering done on my small station.  I ended up just folding some of the panels over to form the ridge cap.  Based on some of the photos here it looks like that's what some of the builders had done.



____________________
Michael
-------
Nye, Inyo & Esmeralda Railroad
Back To Top


 Current time is 06:08 pm
Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  ...  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Narrow Gauge > Modeling 'The Gilpin Tram' - pt.II
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems