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Scratch building a 3 sided shed
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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 10:35 am
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Sean W
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Hey guys,

I left the hobby around 10 years ago when I was 14, because of high school, cars, girls etc etc. My life is starting to settle down and Im going to be able to get back into the hobby soon. Ill be getting my own apartment and will be able to setup a layout soon. Ill be going for a late 40's Arizona mining layout in HO.

During the weekend I attended the " Big Train Show " here in Ontario CA. All the layouts really got my juices flowing again and I had an itch to build a model. I thought scratch building a shed would be easy enough and straight forward to build.

So I went to the local hobby store and 99 cent store and got the things I would need to build this. All I really needed was Popsicle sticks and a sheet of balsa wood and glue, along with some cheapo paint brushes.

So I hopped on google images and searched " three sided shed " and came across this, and thought that would make a nice model, so I got to work.

This is the model I was imitating


I am going to build that ^, with these


It wasnt until I got to this point that I decided to start taking pictures, sorry about that


Put the roof 2x4's on


Rear planks


Far side planks


All side planks done


A quick paint wash with brown acrylic paint and water






I wanted to use corrugated metal roof for this model, So I made a jig of types to use as a kind of molding thing to make the corrugated roof panels with.

I glued a number of round tooth pics to a piece of cardboard, then laid a patch of tin foil on it and used a tooth pick to press the tin foil into the groves between each toothpick.


Started doing the roofing


Finished the roof and got it painted


And the finished model. Still have some weathering and painting to do, but this will give you an idea






I think Ill make a small diorama and put a work bench and other details in the shed, maybe hang some lights in there and other things. Anyway, I think it turned out pretty awesome, considering this is my first model after 10 years....

One final pic to give you a sense of scale

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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 10:51 am
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Helmut
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'methinks' you still got the knack of detailed scratchbuilding - so the 10 years aren't lost ,either.



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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 12:14 pm
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Bernd
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As Helmut said "You haven't lost the touch".

Glad to see you getting back to modeling. Great looking shed by the way.

Bernd

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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 02:38 pm
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Dwayne
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Looks good. Like the method of making the corrugated roof.:thumb:



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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 02:46 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Great work after your hiatus!

Please keep sending photos of future projects---


Herb



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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 06:55 pm
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Tim H
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That is a very fine structure, well done.

Tim



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 Posted: Tue Jun 9th, 2015 11:16 pm
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Sean W
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Thanks so much for the kind words guys, not sure how my first model after 10 years was going to be received by all you experienced builders!

Spent a little more time on it today, added the nail details and dirtied it up a bit, still want to get some chalks and get some real rust going on the roof, but I used a black acrylic wash on some of the parts that would would get the dirtiest. Think its turning out good!

Give it a look and let me know what you think!







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 Posted: Wed Jun 10th, 2015 02:55 am
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Thayer
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I think it looks great as well. My only comment is that I would limit the use of balsa as it gets fuzzy so easily, especially for HO. That said, I expect a light coat of spray lacquer followed by a little 320 grit would take good care of that concern in a hurry.

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 Posted: Thu Jun 11th, 2015 02:23 pm
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Herb Kephart
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In the smaller scales, nail holes should be omitted--Take a look at a real shed from an appropriate distance that the model will be viewed at---IE from so many scale feet away--and the nail holes will be invisible. Only larger knot holes will show.

Unless, that is, if you are modeling a war zone, and the building got strafed by 20mm. fire.

Others will not agree with this--but try looking at a real shed from 100 ft away--typical HO viewing distance for a model.  Only--possibly--a few rust stains vertically running down from some nail heads (also far too easily overdone) will show up.

Just one of my pet peeves, along with too thick wood shingle butts. They should be no more that what ever one inch is in your scale  (.012'' in HO)--for old hand split shingles. More like one half inch with newer, machine split ones. Any more than this would be looked at as a waste of wood.

Please take this as a suggestion, rather than a criticism.

Herb.




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 Posted: Thu Jun 11th, 2015 03:02 pm
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mabloodhound
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So glad you chose to use vertical board siding instead of "plywood" like the prototype.
As for nail holes, I did the same thing on my return to scratchbuilding a few years back.
I have now adopted the Herb procedure.  After looking at hundreds of real buildings I find his remarks to be on point.  But that still doesn't take away from your great job.
So glad to see young folks getting back into the hobby.



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