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HBR&TCo
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 Posted: Sun Nov 12th, 2017 05:51 am
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Michael M
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I'd love to get my hands on a few of the old Mantua freight cars with the metal underframes.  They're easily converted to 35n2, and the metal underframes provided the needed weight.



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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 06:08 pm
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Reg H
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Michael M wrote: I'd love to get my hands on a few of the old Mantua freight cars with the metal underframes.  They're easily converted to 35n2, and the metal underframes provided the needed weight.

Michael:
If any were in the collection I would gladly give you first right of refusal.  

Other than locomotives, almost all the rolling stock is Athearn with a few Accurail thrown in.

I paid a visit to the layout from which all this is coming on Saturday and scored a couple of boxes full of freight cars, a Life-Like SD in GN livery, and a 2-8-2 in GN colors.  

The 2-8-2 is definitely not anything the GN ran, but it looks cool. I can't find any branding on it, but my guess is Rivarosi (sp?).  It is not a high quality locomotive, but it was only going to sit in that unheated garage loft and rust, so what the heck. 

All the locos will need to be converted to DCC and the rolling stock will almost all need new wheels.  I have very negative memories of running plastic wheels. 

The layout was built by the dad, who passed away in November, of a friend.  I was kind of generous with my offer on the rolling stock because I felt sort of guilty for what I paid for the locomotives.

Demolition on the west end of the HBR&N Co. is complete except for some minor clean up.  This was the easiest demo project, emotionally, because almost all of it had been damage in the various disasters anyway.  

The next section will be more difficult as it is the only part of the railroad not in need of major repair.  

I will start the thread on the Henderson Bay Branch of the BN in the HO section pretty soon. 

Reg



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 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2017 09:44 pm
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W C Greene
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Michael, how about this...build a nice underframe in 35n2 and get ahold of some RTV silicone rubber, they make it for metal casting, and make a mold or 3 and then use some low melting point metal (Cerro Safe or even fire sprinkler metal "triggers") to make the frames. I have done this and it can become a "hobby within a hobby". Imagine all the cool 1:35 car & loco parts you could make, might even sell some!

Woodie



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 Posted: Tue Nov 14th, 2017 04:29 pm
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Reg H
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W C Greene wrote: Michael, how about this...build a nice underframe in 35n2 and get ahold of some RTV silicone rubber, they make it for metal casting, and make a mold or 3 and then use some low melting point metal (Cerro Safe or even fire sprinkler metal "triggers") to make the frames. I have done this and it can become a "hobby within a hobby". Imagine all the cool 1:35 car & loco parts you could make, might even sell some!

Woodie



Woodie:
Or even another hobby.  My new machine shop is a lot of fun...but I seem to be making more stuff for others than myself.
:)
Reg



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 Posted: Tue Nov 14th, 2017 06:42 pm
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Herb Kephart
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".but I seem to be making more stuff for others than myself."

Ever the curse of hobby machine shops

One solution is to complain how busy you are (Usually has no effect. "Just do it in your spare time") When the H**L  do you think that I do anything in this shop?
And then do the job in a year, or so. (Good solution, but still not foolproof.)

If the annoying life form has ANY useful ability, before the part is done hit them up for a favor.
Even the dense ones usually get this message. Payment before delivery, and all that.

Of course, if it's a good friend, do it with a smile! They would do the same for you, likely.

Herb

PS Don't even dream that if you ever start machining for $$, that any of the above changes one iota, especially the fact that they expect you to work for free.



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 Posted: Wed Nov 15th, 2017 10:30 pm
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Reg H
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Herb:
Actually, the latest is DEMANDING that I tell her how much she owes me.  But then, she makes beautiful walking sticks and knows what it takes to make things. I have one of her sticks.  Paid full retail for it. 
I once turned a hobby into a profession.  I spent several years as a professional photographer following a young life of being a happy amateur. 
Following a marathon five-month stint in Alaska, during which I lost just about everything but the shirt off my back, I haven't taken a serious photo since.
Reg



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 Posted: Thu Nov 16th, 2017 07:44 pm
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Lee B
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Reg H wrote:
I once turned a hobby into a profession. 


Yeah, I have a degree in Commercial Art (over 1000 actual classroom hours) from the late 80s and I probably couldn't have made but a few house payments on all the money I ever earned as a commercial artist for the first 10 years.
The first lesson they should teach in art school is that people value the finished product but NEVER the work that went into it.
I still do stuff for publications and have a substantial amount of credits to my name, but never little of it ever paid anything appreciable. No way you can make a living at it.
I don't often tell people I know how to draw anymore, because people will declare I've being given the 'honor' to draw whatever enters their idiot minds. I also have a strict policy at work; if you somehow found out I know how to draw, I charge commercial rates for whatever you want. No exceptions. EVER. This is because no matter how and fast the rule, people will still assume you'll go against it just for them. Had a nasty week dealing with my wife who wanted me to draw the deceased grandfather of a co-worker of hers. I explained that I never EVER draw for work and she said she knows, but wanted it anyway (which is how it always works: everyone but them). It was one of the few times I put my foot down and it stayed there when she was concerned.
"Never means NEVER, and you already knew that," was the last word I gave on the subject to her.



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 Posted: Thu Nov 16th, 2017 08:19 pm
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Reg H
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Lee:
One of the problems I had in photography was that my interest was in high quality B&W portraiture.

That kind of work is very time consuming...from spending quality time with the subject to the darkroom work necessary to create a quality product...and expensive.  High quality materials and fine art equipment do not come cheap.

But so many people are satisfied with a 1/2 hour studio sitting (which says nothing about the subject...it is just a picture) and inexpensive "packages" of prints.  

Very limited number of people understand that a quality portrait involves at least half a day with the subject in their environment, and the finished product will be a single 16X20, framed, B&W print.  With the option of ordering additional framed 16X20 prints. 

Enough of the rant... 

Reg



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