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JawboneFlats
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I was passing through Carson City Nevada and stopped by the State RR Museum. They were "closed" since it was a Monday, but I took the opportunity to wander all around and through any of the buildings that weren't locked up. I passed by this flatcar load of the former Tucson, Cornelia & Gila Bend #6's remains. It's an interesting artifact, huh?

Dennis aka JawbonneFlats


Salada
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The rear non-flanged driving wheels look to be of a wider gauge than the flanged (pilot) bogie wheels. What happened at track switches ?.


Regards              Michael

JawboneFlats
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Hi Michael,
Oh, I think all the wheelsets are standard gauge. Placing the hulk on the flatcar didn't require the precision that would be needed to put it on track so it's a little skewed. I added a photo of the rear drive wheel. It includes what little documentation I got regarding the provenance of the artifact, and also clearly shows the flanges on the wheel.
regards,
Dennis aka JawboneFlats

It looks like it could be sitting on one of those proverbial "Jawbone flats", LOL,

Salada
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Thanks Dennis --- I can see the rear wheel flanges now.

Can you explain to an (?) innocent  Brit what "Jawbone Flats " are ?.

Apartment blocks (flats) where the residents talk a lot ? ... probably not !.


Regards                  Michael

JawboneFlats
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Well, about the time when I first signed up for Freerails I had just returned from a place called "Jawbone Flats" which is an old abandoned mining town surrounded by some of the most lush old growth forest you’ll find in Oregon. Being suitably impressed by the experience, I latched on to the  mining camp's name as a moniker. I actually prefer to think of the name as a somewhat enigmatic reference to maybe that place in the woods or maybe something like that sway backed, highly weathered flatcar at the Nevada museum, or maybe just a slightly altered state of mind. Who knows.

As a bonus, here's a link to my earlier posting documenting the visit to the woods.
http://www.freerails.com/view_topic.php?id=5907&forum_id=11

Sorry for the confusion...
Dennis aka JawboneFlats

Si.
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FUNKY JUNK !

Nice pic. Dennis.

That flat-car is pretty cool as well !

Cheers.

Si.

Si.
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( not so flat really, is it ! ...

... just chuckleing, tee hee )

Si.

Salada
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Thanks Dennis.

Ah, the (slightly) mind altering iproperties of those old mining camps !

Regards. Michael

Ray Dunakin
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Wow. It's hard to say which is in sorrier shape, the railcar or the flat car.

Herb Kephart
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Took another look at the pix of the rear wheel, and realized that all they did was remove the rim and tire--apearantly using the small ''flange'' that stops the rim from going on the wheel too far. I would think that with a worn section of rail that flange would be prone to walking off the rail--it is usually only about a half inch high.

But then, that might be why the car is in the condition that it is.

That style wheel remains on the axle when you want to change a tire. With the rim and tire removed (and the air out) there is a neat tool called a ''rim jack'' that collapses the rim, and allows the tire and tube to be lifted off. Very easy to change a tire--no prying involved.

Herb

Edit-- looking for the 5th or 6th time, I think that I may be wrong. I don't see any evidence of holes for bolts that the ''Jaxon'' clamps that held the rim on would go through and also the area from the hub to the outer diameter is a piece of steel plate. It is flat, whereas the car wheel, being much thinner would have some contour pressed into it to add stiffness. I guess that they machined up a proper flange and rim and fastened it to the plate with all those rivets.

Sorry, it's before noon, and my brain is still asleep............

H

Harry N
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I have seen these rims before on many photos of rail cars. I do believe they were manufactured by some one just for the rail car needs. The flange, while not as deep as standard railcar flanges, is about a deep as most streetcar flanges and will ride the rail quite well. Realize that these cars did not go 50 mph on most tracks - that would lead to disasters.

PCC cars (the last modern American streetcar made before 1957) had flanges about this deep and have been operated as fast as 50 mph, or more, especially on the old Library line out of Pittsburg (usually late at night).

I would like to have that pile of junk just to rebuild the rail car as I have ridden over the old Tucson Cornelia Bend rail grade when I lived in Tucson. :mex:


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