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gum trees
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 Posted: Fri Apr 18th, 2014 09:15 pm
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Bill Fornshell
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Last spring I bought three, one gallon size pots of Sedum "Autumn Joy" flowers. They did really well and I got about 25 good stems from them in the fall. The flowers are coming back up and at last count it looks like I will have 50 plus stems this year. They are out-growing the original pots and it will be necessary to find larger flower pots for next year.

This is one from last year as it looked when I bought it.

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 Posted: Fri Apr 18th, 2014 10:59 pm
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dennischee
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Hi Bill,
I tried various nurseies around my area with no luck I ended up buying four online, but they ars tubes, so I don't know how long it will take them to grow. Anyway what Rod has kindly sent me will do for a start.
Dennis

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 Posted: Fri Apr 18th, 2014 11:04 pm
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Bill Fornshell
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I live in San Antonio, TX and found mine at a nursery about 2 miles away. This is a good flower for my area so they are sort of popular.

They like full sun.

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 Posted: Thu Apr 24th, 2014 10:13 am
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danpickard
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Hi gents,
Always happy to see some other modellers having a crack at doing some gum trees. Since there are so many varieties of gums around, its always good to see other interpretation that could be used again in the future.

For those that were looking for my previous clinic notes to download, that file has been removed. I have recently re-written those notes with a few more details, and changed the format of them a little, so they are now designed for better screen viewing as a landscape page (or still print them out).

I had the clinic notes available for free for quite some time, but since there has been continued interest in the technique, and I have been presenting how-to clinics at exhibitions, I have produced the clinic to now be available on a CD for purchase. The clinic is around 35 pages of detailed notes and photos, and the CD also has a number of photo albums of my projects that feature the gum trees in scenes after being constructed. The CD's are normally available as part of my display when I attend model railway exhibitions here locally in Australia, but some will be available shortly online (via that usual online shopping place)...or just PM me for details.

Cheers,
Dan Pickard

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 Posted: Fri Apr 25th, 2014 01:37 pm
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danpickard
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I suppose I could add some ideas to the thread as well...











Cheers,
Dan Pickard

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 Posted: Fri Apr 25th, 2014 04:05 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Dan,

Anything that the wood from those trees is particularly good for?

They seem very prolific -- at least on Oz model railroads.

Herb



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 Posted: Fri Apr 25th, 2014 10:15 pm
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Rod Hutchinson
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Herb,

The tall trees Dan has moddeled are Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus Regnans). The are fine grain hardwood used for building houses & furniture.



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 Posted: Sat Apr 26th, 2014 12:22 am
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Herb Kephart
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Thanks, Rod-

We have Mountain Ash here also, there is a color called "Mountain Ash Scarlet". I don't know if it refers to the leaf color or blossoms.

Edit- This from Wikipedia-
" Sorbus americana (syn. Pyrus americana) is commonly known as the American Mountain-ash.[3] It is a deciduous perennial tree, native to eastern North America.[2]"
Blossoms white, berries red. Wood white,close grained, weak.


Herb



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 Posted: Sat Apr 26th, 2014 01:21 am
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Lost Creek RR
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Herb
Rod is correct when he says the Mountain Ash is hard wood. The older part of our house frame was made in 1979 of hardwood. It is so hard you cannot I repeat cannot drive a nail into it as it stands today. If I want to put in a screw to hold something to the wall I have to drill a hole almost the same size as the screw or it will not even look at it lubricated our not.It's that hard. It was used for a very long time in construction because of it's strength.
Rod.

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 Posted: Sat Apr 26th, 2014 09:09 am
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danpickard
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A lot of gum ain't much good as construction stuff, with the hardwood gear being the exception. Often find it used for a few more smaller decorative things (some of the timber colours are quite beautiful), but I believe one of the main uses of gum trees was fuel, especially red gum. I understand a heap of gums were grown somewhere in the US with the intention of using them for railroad ties, but the trees didn't exactly grow straight enough to be useful!

Aside from the wood, the oil from the leaves is also harvested, and the koalas like to dine on them :)

Cheers,
Dan Pickard

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