Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Narrow Gauge > Finally Figured Out A Name For 1:35 Scale

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Finally Figured Out A Name For 1:35 Scale
 Moderated by: . Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Jan 26th, 2015 07:54 am
  PMQuoteReply
21st Post
William M
Registered


Joined: Wed Jan 7th, 2015
Location:  (Up The Road From Stratford-Upon-Avon), United Kingdom
Posts: 83
Status: 
Offline
B*****d scale?;)



____________________
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 26th, 2015 09:11 am
  PMQuoteReply
22nd Post
Paglesham
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Aug 24th, 2008
Location: East Anglia, United Kingdom
Posts: 231
Status: 
Offline
We only have all these silly scales because people are irrationally scared of making track. Pick a sensible scale that's on your steel rule and make the track accordingly. Get some cahonas, gents. Rail, timber sleepers and moulded chairs. For the American gents, you just need spikes. SO easy!
2 foot gauge in 1/32nd scale (the hell with Tamiya scale)=3/4". On my steel rule. 2 foot in 4mm scale? 8mm . Make your own track. 2-6 in 4mm scale. 10 mm, easy. 2-6 in HO, well, OK 8.75mm is close enough to N gauge.
Of course it would make so much sense if we all went for the infinitely more sensible 1/48th scale for O gauge. Some tosh about mechanisms being too large to get in a British Loading Gauge loco in 1/48th scale, even though perfectly small enough motors were around then. If that were not the case, how come small slot racing cars were around before the War? 7mm - 1 ft is utter stupidity, but then you guys went just as daft by using 3.5mm (half UK O scale) for your littluns. Then we doubled our stupidity by making our HO into OO because of the motor size drivvle all over again! But we pretty soon came up with the much smaller TT, didn't we? So all that motor size stuff was always tosh.

Martin



____________________
Manifestly it is better to use simple tools expertly than to possess a bewildering assortment of complicated gadgets and either neglect or use them incompetently. ( L.T.C.Rolt) Blog @ http://oddsoracle.blogspot.co.uk/
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 26th, 2015 03:50 pm
  PMQuoteReply
23rd Post
Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5981
Status: 
Offline
I remember way back, there was a discussion in NG&IRR, as to whether it was ''better'' to use a commercial gauge track and wheel dimensions, altering scale to suit, or to go with a popular scale, and make the wheels/track fit that scale.

Consensus was, if I recall, that the later was the way to go, because it was easier to modify wheels and mechanisms, laying track to suit, than to have to create people, animals autos and other detail parts, most of which require the ability to carve convincing pieces.

Makes sense to me----

Herb



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 26th, 2015 03:54 pm
  PMQuoteReply
24th Post
Dan W
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Jan 23rd, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 10
Status: 
Offline
I'll have to disagree....the only valid reason for our profusion of silly scales and gauges is backlash against the Proto48 and other "fine scale" upperclassmen.
You do have a point about all of us going to all sorts of extremes not to mention the considerable efforts in justification just so we don't have to lay our own rail.
It would have all been easier if the French had not gotten all full of themselves in coming up with the metrique systeme. Luckily they were not prescient enough to also set up a Federation Internationale Modellisme and thus adjudicate all of our modeling efforts for ever more......
dan
:glad:

Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 26th, 2015 05:37 pm
  PMQuoteReply
25th Post
Helmut
Registered


Joined: Sun Feb 17th, 2013
Location: Friedberg, Germany
Posts: 1177
Status: 
Offline
Oh, and don't forget how a those 'reasonable' Military scales came to life...Those 'darned Brits' had 1", 2" , 2.5", and 3" pewter casting moulds for their soldier figures -  now take a height of 72" for a man, ( soldiers always have to be impressive ) and there you are.
1:72, 1:36, 1:29  and 1:24

Last edited on Mon Jan 26th, 2015 05:37 pm by Helmut



____________________
Regards, H.
Back To Top

 Posted: Mon Jan 26th, 2015 06:41 pm
  PMQuoteReply
26th Post
Dan W
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Jan 23rd, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 10
Status: 
Offline
Let's not even get started on the gamers and figure (doll?) collector/painters............28mm, 54mm, etc.,etc. They have us model rail guys beat all to heck when it comes to scale bashing...
We have a current tv program here in the US that tries to explain how our states got their borders and names.....some good stories there.
For our purposes, when it comes down to it, we pretty much can group the 1/76-87-ish scales together under the "HO/OO" name, the 1/48-ish scales together under the "O", and the 1/32-ish scales together (isn't there an "F" associated with 3/8" to the foot scale somehow?) as far as general size and suitability of exchanging various components to suit our needs. Not so sure about the "G" scene........quite a spread between the high teens and the low thirties in scale, not to mention the blonde at the end of the bar....
dan

Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 27th, 2015 01:58 am
  PMQuoteReply
27th Post
Ray Dunakin
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 25th, 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1242
Status: 
Offline
If we add "n" to the scale designation to indicate narrow gauge (HOn3, On30, etc) then what is used to indicate broad gauge? Maybe a "b"?

For instance, if someone was modeling in HO scale, a pre-Civil War southern railroad that was 5' gauge, would it be HOb5?



____________________
Visit http://www.raydunakin.com to see photos of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 27th, 2015 03:51 am
  PMQuoteReply
28th Post
Dan W
Registered
 

Joined: Fri Jan 23rd, 2015
Location:  
Posts: 10
Status: 
Offline
That works for me.....have recently been studying up on Russian Revolution and up thru WW2 armored trains, those of which in the USSR were 5' ga. Also have seen info on our Civil War railroads which were a bunch of gauges, and not just in the south. Very interesting point that you brought up, Ray.
So my 1/48th scale static models of Soviet armored trains shown on Atlas track would actually be Ob5.......while the German and other Euro units would mostly be just plain O.
dan

Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 27th, 2015 08:59 am
  PMQuoteReply
29th Post
hminky
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Apr 5th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 263
Status: 
Offline
Herb Kephart wrote: I remember way back, there was a discussion in NG&IRR, as to whether it was ''better'' to use a commercial gauge track and wheel dimensions, altering scale to suit, or to go with a popular scale, and make the wheels/track fit that scale.

Consensus was, if I recall, that the later was the way to go, because it was easier to modify wheels and mechanisms, laying track to suit, than to have to create people, animals autos and other detail parts, most of which require the ability to carve convincing pieces.

Makes sense to me----

Herb
How many of the people who want to alter the wheels/track ever tried that or are they just arm chair guys "wind-baggin' "?

 People, animals, autos etc. are in a fuzzy scale area: 1/43.5 autos and people used in "O" scale etc.  Most of them can be just "close enough". See:

Scale55 Narrow Gauge



It ain't easier to modify wheels/track to a popular or unpopular scale:

Making Sn3 from HO



Been there done that!

Harold


Last edited on Tue Jan 27th, 2015 09:01 am by hminky

Back To Top

 Posted: Tue Jan 27th, 2015 10:59 am
  PMQuoteReply
30th Post
Paglesham
Registered
 

Joined: Sun Aug 24th, 2008
Location: East Anglia, United Kingdom
Posts: 231
Status: 
Offline
Some people are just happy to turn stuff out that is to a daft scale. Prize for daft scale in model cars is 1/18th! What a stupid scale. You won't find it on your steel rule, but in trains the British O gauge, at 1/43.5 is truly stupid. However, there are now so many die cast and white metal road vehicles in that dumbass scale that we all do choo-choos in it to make it all look right.
If I had the time, I would do British outline trains AND road vehicles to 1/48th scale. I make model boats to 1/48th scale as they, at least, are made to sensible scales.
I don't think it's anything to do with the Finescale people as Finescale or Proto this and that are relatively recent.
N gauge was decreed as 2 1/16th mm to a foot! But Finescale 2 mm scale is 2mm to a foot and, btw is possibly the oldest finescale movement. I have no idea what the USA does for the tiddly gauge. Clearly, 2mm or N scale came from being half of 4mm scale. Indeed I found a box of Lone Star push along toy railways at a market on Saturday. Lone star Treblo it used to be called, then it went to Treblo-Lectric, from which all N gauge seemed to come. Even though 2mm finescalers were already beetling away in their back rooms doing fine work of a similar size.
S...why "S"? Great scale, nice and Imperial, nice size. Why didn't the toy purveyors go with that instead of 4mm, I wonder?
TT...for Table Top. Great potential, never followed up by the toy people, except Triang. At the time, Triang TT mechanisms were used in loads of Narrow Gauge locos, particularly 5.5mm scale. What??? I hear you ask and I agree, but actually some of, if not all the best narrow gauge layouts are to that odd scale. As far as I know George Mellor of GEM models made a range of Ffestiniog Railway kits to run on 12mm (TT) gauge track and reckoned 5.5 to the foot was the one to use, even though 2 foot gauge on 12mm track would have been an easy bit of maths.
There's now an active 5.5 society and some lovely layouts in that scale.
But we could have had TT as 1/8th" scale, OO could have been 3/16" (S) scale and O gauge could have been 1/4" scale, with the big boy being (as in fact it now is)3/8" scale for 1 gauge.
G stands for garden so isn't really modelling at all (I'll get my coat).

Martin



____________________
Manifestly it is better to use simple tools expertly than to possess a bewildering assortment of complicated gadgets and either neglect or use them incompetently. ( L.T.C.Rolt) Blog @ http://oddsoracle.blogspot.co.uk/
Back To Top


 Current time is 09:37 am
Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  

Freerails > Model Railroad Forums > Narrow Gauge > Finally Figured Out A Name For 1:35 Scale
Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems