Freerails Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register

Freerails IS ACCEPTING new Members ... To join Freerails ... See how to Register as a Member in the 'Joining Freerails' Forum

Railcar controversy
 Moderated by: .
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Nov 11th, 2012 03:01 pm
  PMQuoteReply
1st Post
pipopak
Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 13th, 2011
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 2000
Status: 
Offline
I follow the H.A.M.B site also and today found this pic over there:

along with this caption:
"Description:This historic image is of what was described as a gasoline-powered railcar that was part of the White River Railroad of Vermont that was completed in Gaysville around 1900. Two men can be seen posing for the photographer, probably the conductor in front and an owner standing in the doorway based on their dress. The railcar is black with the number "101" and word "Stanley" painted on the side. Deciduous trees can be seen in the background. The season is summer. Donald B. Valentine writes on 2006-2-15: The two men in this photo appear to be incorrectly identified. The man in the doorway is more likely the conductor and the man in the window the motorman or operator, corresponding to the engineer of a normal locomotive. This is not, however, a "gasoline-powered rail car". Rather, as the Stanley name on the side clearly indicates, it was a steam powered rail car powered by a boiler and drive train very similar to what the Stanley Steam Carriage Company of Newton, Massachusetts, used to power their Stanley Steamer automobiles. The car is believed to be being tested on the White River Railroad at this time and was later on the Boston & Maine, where it ultimately burned in an enginehouse fire in Bristol, New Hampshire."
I see what looks like a radiator and a muffler behind it. So it would be gas powered, right?. Jose.

Last edited on Sun Nov 11th, 2012 03:39 pm by pipopak



____________________
Junk is something you throw away three weeks before you need it.
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 11th, 2012 07:41 pm
  PMQuoteReply
2nd Post
Bernd
Registered
 

Joined: Wed Jul 18th, 2012
Location: New York USA
Posts: 826
Status: 
Offline
This should clear up the question of the type of power used. Scroll down to the bottom.

http://theoldmotor.com/?s=stanley&paged=6

Bernd

Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 11th, 2012 09:49 pm
  PMQuoteReply
3rd Post
pipopak
Moderator


Joined: Wed Apr 13th, 2011
Location: Florida USA
Posts: 2000
Status: 
Offline
Thanks!. Jose.



____________________
Junk is something you throw away three weeks before you need it.
Back To Top

 Posted: Sun Nov 11th, 2012 11:15 pm
  PMQuoteReply
4th Post
Herb Kephart
Moderator


Joined: Thu Jul 19th, 2007
Location: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5981
Status: 
Offline
One thing that isn't mentioned in the link is the "radiator" is there to condense the used steam back into water. Steam autos consume a very large amount of water, and in the early, round nose (now called "coffin nose") Stanley cars--pre 1915-- the exhaust was vented to the atmosphere after passing through the engine, Depending on the size of the water tank on the car, this could mean stopping to refill the water tank every 25 miles. Not as much a problem back then as it is now, as back then there were plenty of horse watering troughs along the roads. The teamsters and other horse users looked down on this, feeling the motorist was "stealing" "their" water. There were also claims that horses would refuse to drink from the supply after the steam car desecrated it. Later cars had what looked like a conventional car radiator out in front, to condense at least some of the steam back into water--and extend the mileage between stops

Herb  



____________________
Fix it again, Mr Gates--it still works!"
Back To Top


 Current time is 10:27 am

Top



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems