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pipopak
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Take a look at this picture taken at a Cuban wharf in 1904. There are hardly two wood pieces the same size!.
http://www.shorpy.com/node/10326?size=_original


Since the subject matter changed- to one that needs much more discussion IMO-I moved it to scratch building and kitbashing--which is were most weathering occurs.


Herb

Last edited on Thu Apr 21st, 2011 01:26 pm by

Herb Kephart
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Looks more like the aftermath in Japan!!


Herb  :old dude:

wclm
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Great shot. What a mess. Went into the Shorpy site and there is some even greater stuff there.

                                                                      Clif K

pipopak
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Love those pictures. Detail is GREAT.

Herb Kephart
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You can spend hours at Shorpy!


Herb  :old dude:

pipopak
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What I like most about the site is that it shows you how things were THEN. I personally find most (if not all) layouts set into that era grossly over weathered. If you are modeling, say, 1920's, everything built on that year was NEW and everything else was maintained. But you see any layout set in 1920 trains are rolling wrecks, structures are falling apart and cars are junkyard rejects. While craftsmanship is superb, I find it hardly realistic.

wclm
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PIPOPAK

 Got to agree with you on that one. I myself fell into that trap. I originally liked the weathering and still do but now I look at it differently. I do have things that look as if no one cared what they looked liked and never cleaned anything up. I see great things done and then you look closer and you see weathered wood inside buildings, in use, with wood grain that looks like scenes  from the Canyonlands. Just my opinion and you know what they say about opinions and toilet paper.

                                                                         Clif K

Rod Hutchinson
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PIPOPAK.

I have to agree also.  I am sometimes struck by the success of heavily weathered / rundown models in competitions, whilst the well cared for look in models is mostly overlooked as winners.

W C Greene
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I don't really worry about weathering, Mother Nature does that for me quite well. As for junky & funky in the 20's, I agree, things were relatively new then. That's why I have "pushed" my layout into 1950 or so..due to my love for that 49 Merc (don't have that but do have a 49 Ford) and I was given a nice model of a 1950 MGTD and being an MG nut, I had to put it on the layout also. Now, when I find a nice 56 Chebby...

                              Woodie

Herb Kephart
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Got to agree with pipopak, Clif and Rod.

Too much weathering is overdone, IMO.

Besides, the twenties were a time when equipment was taken care of, more than it is today.

Herb  :old dude:

mosslake1
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Well, this is a pleasant change, discussing modeling 'the norm'. It seems that modeling too often leans toward the gimmicky exaggerated worn out look. Weathered but maintained as in ordinary everyday use is (for me) more appealing.

Any railroad with the sort of broken down and downright dangerous equipment often seen on some model railroads would soon be out of business. Logging is a classic example where the true condition of equipment is overlooked (or ignored) in favour of the 'cute' caricture of the shoe-string operation.  Companies then, as now, realised you can't turn a profit if your equipment keeps breaking all the time.

pipopak
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Well, this thread is very interesting but way off the original post. Where would be the most appropriate forum to start as a new topic?. General or scenery or...?


Moved to scratch building and kitbashing  see first post---Herb

Last edited on Thu Apr 21st, 2011 01:28 pm by

mopman
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The only thing I know of that can't be weathered too much is a SP diesel.

down under
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bring on the paint ,airbrush,chalks,water colours,oils,powders and dirty fingers i love the teckniques and damm reality
cheers kim

sledhead
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Agree, a lot of narrow guage stuff ends up looking like the last train out of Baghdad.

wclm
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On the Shorpy.com site there is a pic, search "Homeward bound 1938" . I don't know if you would call it over the top weathering or just flat used up. If you look at the details in the photo, like the guys  shoes (toe exposed) , socks(pinned to his pants), the truck bed wired together or the parking block behind the tire, the whole scene is just flat used up and worn out. It good be a good shot for Woodies layout. From the look on his face all looks bad but that's all he has got. Makes me glad I'm where I'm at.
                                                                                     Clif K

madmike3434
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sounds like a picture the great WALKER EVANS government photographer was taking during the 1936--1938 era

 

mike

wclm
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Mike

 If you have not seen it, it is well worth a look. A person could spend entirely too much time on the site cruising through the subjects.

                                                                               Clif K

madmike3434
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interesting picture, while i was there, shorpy , i searched walker evans and looked at a bunch of his photos.

 

mike

pipopak
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If you do a search at Shorpy's just for railroad you will find a lifetime of detail ideas... unweathered!.

W C Greene
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Well, you got your choice..consider the old Argent Lumber Co., their locos were indeed rolling junk. On the other hand, anyone who weathers up a West Side Lumber Shay is not familiar with the real thing. WSLCO painted all their locos and log cars during the off season, things were kept very nice & clean. Maybe a little road grime, but never any rust, etc.

                      Woodie


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