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Broadoak
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The layout as I’ve said in my introduction was built as a competition entry that must not exceed four square feet. The actual baseboard measures 38 inches x 15 inches and the fiddle yard is 24 inches long and 10 inches wide. The whole thing when bolted together then sits on an ironing board.

I have a few pictures of when the layout was first started so I will begin with those.
The track plan is very simple and is supposed to be a terminus on a large farm estate railway. Being very loosely based on an actual estate railway, it is a might have been rather than an actually was if you know what I mean.

The track is code 100 with about a third of the sleepers removed and re-spaced to give a more rustic appearance. The points are Peco setrack which take up very little room, covered with ballast and ground cover look acceptable. Point control is by wire in tube.

Peter

W C Greene
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Neat layout, Peter. Now, is this 1:35n2 or 1:32n20? Or does it matter at all?

That's how I started out on my current (and last) layout, one section so I could run my little 0-4-2t. I have kind of let it get away from me!

                                Woodie

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In the UK Woodie we just call it 1/32 scale, 3/8 of one inch to the foot. It is very uncommon, most modellers working in 4mm 009 or 7mm HO16.5.

I must admit that some of my rail trucks are actually 1/35 scale so I’m a bit flexible in that department.

A close up picture of my first rail truck which is an Italeri 1/35 kit that I have modified to ride on an Athearn SW7 switcher chassis. It is seen outside a greenhouse that was used to get the seed potatoes started sprouting prior to being planted in the spring. In England we call this chitting. On the estate the model is based on the green house was ¼ mile long with a two foot gauge track running through the centre.

In summer tomatoes were grown in the greenhouse.



I wanted some motive power that was a bit different from the norm, something that made a change from most narrow gauge layouts with their predominantly steam outline locos.
I had come across some pictures of a Bedford truck running on rails in New Zealand and this set me thinking. A trip to my local model shop saw me buying a 1/35 scale Italeri military kit of an Opel Blitz truck. I took it home and studied the parts. A germ of an idea was forming in my mind, could I get the truck body to fit over an Athearn switcher chassis?
A swift check with a set of dividers suggested I could with some modifications. Consisting mainly of removing parts of the internal parts of the lorry to allow for the centrally mounted motor, fly wheels, drive shafts and gear towers to fit inside.
I started with the Opel chassis and removed all the cross members, it fitted snugly against the Athearn centrally mounted motor. It was then a case of making a sub frame of plasticard to locate the two parts together. I cut an area of the load carrying body away to allow the motor, fly wheel, drive shaft and gear tower to protrude into the truck. This was covered by a box made of plasticard so it couldn’t be seen.
To get the rest of the truck body to fit meant removing part of the cab floor, the seats part of the back of the cab and the bulkhead between the engine and cab.
The whole thing is held together by self tapping screws that go through the truck chassis and push against the sides of the motor. All a bit crude I know, but it works.





Last edited on Sat Oct 2nd, 2010 11:04 pm by Broadoak

W C Greene
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Very cool Peter...I love the background of your line, a "cottage industry" for sure. I sort of hang with the 1:35 scale since 16.5MM gauge represents 24" gauge quite well. If you have a chance, check out my little line, the Mogollon Railway, shown elsewhere in this site. No internal combustion (yet!) on the line but it does run a "westernized" Garratt.

Send more photos, I really like what you've done.

                            Woodie

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I must say your Mogollon Railway is very impressive Woodie and a tad bigger than mine judging by the sepia map.

The whole model looks very realistic from the track work to the old trucks and cars. The steam locomotives all look good but my favourite is the Garrat no 4, beautifully painted and weathered.

I’m ashamed to say that I only have one steam loco being an unashamed internal combustion engine fan. That’s what makes this a great hobby we all have different interests.

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Here is a view taken in the early stages looking towards the fiddle yard hidden by an over bridge.

A start has been made on the structures, with from left to right a loading dock, greenhouse, and tractor and implement repair work shop/ barn and the foreman’s hut.

The track is lightly pinned then glued when the ballast is put on.

The two aerial views give some idea of how small it is being just 38 inches long.



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I wanted something to disguise the back corner and small bridge over the track that hides the fiddle yard. I thought a tree would do the job looking natural and not contrived.

The tree is actually made from thin telephone wire. We had a new timing system put in at work ( a motor racing circuit ) and there was loads of this wire going spare.
I twisted the wire round itself to make a tree shape adding extra bits for branches. The whole thing was shall we say less than rigid. So I wrapped kitchen towel round the trunk and branches then soaked it in neat PVA. After a few days it had dried out and I then coated it with a thin layer of Milliput modelling putty. When this was drying I scribed it to look a bit more like bark. When this had hardened off I painted the trunk and branches a greenish grey colour with acrylics. Then I washed several coats of a very dark grey with a little black India ink added to it over the whole thing until I thought it looked right. Then I dry brushed it with light grey and glued on a whole pack of Woodland Scenics foliage.

This shows the tree in the early stages of construction

The tractor is an MF 135 an early Britains die cast model.

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This shows the tree with the trunk and main branches in a more finished state.The tree is glued to the base board with white PVA glue.

The tractor on the bridge this time is a Fordson 27N, a white metal kit.

The small diesel, an HO scale 0-4-0 Hornby model is in the throes of being modified to suit the bigger scale.

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The same scene as in the above post but from a different angle.

The cab on the diesel only just clears the underside of the bridge.

The figures and drums are 1/35 scale Tamiya military items.

Rudimentary ground cover has been applied.

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I have now added a few more branches made of wire and used a whole pack of Woodland Scenics material.

The large asbestos barn of a type common in the 40’s and 50’s were the tractors and implements were to be serviced and stored. I made it from a child’s toy barn made by Britain’s. It came in a dark green and reddish orange coloured loose parts and was supposed to be held together with the small self tapping screws provided. I cut the whole thing up into sections and glued them together MEK to form the shape and size I wanted.
In fact there was enough material left over to make the rudimentary engine house as well.
When they were assembled they were both sprayed with an acrylic grey undercoat as a base coat. The engine house was painted in a humbrol light green. The interiors of both structures were painted matt black.
The supports of the barn were hollow so I filled these with household DIY filler to make them look solid. I took some photographs of similar barns to match the colours more accurately.
The bridge abutments are plywood covered with DIY filler and scribed to look like stones. They were painted with water colour paints.

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Again showing the early stages I bought a ON30scale Bachmann Porter 0-4-2 steam engine, a Davenport gas mechanical, some wooden side tippers and some metal V tippers.

The wagons although a slightly smaller scale I thought looked alright. The two locomotives however needed a bit of work. At this stage all I did was on the Davenport raise the height of the cab and exhaust pipe. I also added a hand rail to the front and rear as well. I painted the cab green to look a little different. I left the kadees as I am used to them on my USA switching layout.

The corrugated iron is an experiment using a kind of card that is used to stop you burning your hands with hot cups of coffee served in paper cups. I painted it a mix of grey and silver acrylics then dry brushed rust colours on later. The best thing is it didn’t cost a penny.


The Porter I removed the roof, extended the safety valve bonnet, fitted a reversing lever and hand brake wheel. The sides I increased in height and a Tamiya military figure is now the driver.

A bit more work has been done on the layout generally. This time the Fordson 27N has been joined by a Fordson standard "N"

Last edited on Sun Oct 3rd, 2010 05:27 pm by Broadoak

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Peter-
I have to tell you that when I saw the first picture of your 'phone wire tree, I thought "what the #&@@% is that supposed to be?"--but the end result, with the foliage, looks quite good!

A very novel approach, to one of (I think) the most difficult scenery subjects to replicate.

And I like infernal combustion locos also--one of my favorite ones are the Baldwin gas-mechanical 2ft gauge ones from WW1.

Do you plan more sections?


Herb  :old dude:

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Herb-you need to look in that Osprey Terrain Modeling book...the "twisted wire" trees are shown and Peter's tree looks like a real one. BTW-Muj has such a wire tree that is maybe 50 years old and still not finished. He wants to make a weeping willow with it and that is shown also in the book mentioned above. With all the work involved, I am glad that the mines and smelter on my layout have killed off all such vegetation! LOL..

Peter-your lokies look neat, raising the cab roof on one and getting rid of the cab roof on the other..wonderful!

                          Woodie

Broadoak
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Woodie I’ve been having another look at your layout, it is awesome. So many superb little scenes. It makes my little micro on an ironing board look a little sad.

I don’t plan any more extensions Herb as the layout just fits neatly into my car for when I take it to exhibitions. I have done about twenty five so far.

What I am always doing, is looking for more unusual items of motive power. This means more equipment but not a bigger layout.

I’m glad you approve of the tree.

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This is the little Porter modified but as yet un weathered. The long grass and vegetation soaked in PVA glue round the roots of the tree help keep it in place as it is rather heavy. A thin wire through the back scene help secure it in place as well.

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The Opel Blitz rail truck in close-up. I’ve done a little more weathering on it. I like to do a little at a time over a period of time; it seems to work better for me that way.



The rail truck is seen pushing a flat car loaded with sacks of wheat out of the yard.

The flat car is made of scribed plasticard planks to make them look like wood. It was sprayed with red undercoat then washed over with a thin black wash. When this was dry a dry brush with light grey was flicked over it. The trucks are from an old Bachmann HO scale boxcar. All my freight cars are fitted with KD’s.

The rail truck has a KD fitted to the front end only.

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Peter-

I like the fact that you can see a glimpse of the rail truck engine, through the hole where the inner fender (wing) was removed!

Herb  :old dude:

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I bought some sidelines wagon kits and a small Wasp kit and collected them from Steve Bennett at an excellent narrow gauge exhibition in Pewsey, Wiltshire.

The little wagons went together very well and I sprayed then with grey car primer. I then gave them a thin wash of Indian ink lightened with grey acrylic. The iron work was then picked out in a rust colour. All the wagons were fitted with KD couplers.
The Wasp loco sits on a Bachmann 44tonner bogie and has a few extra details an exhaust pipe, air cleaner and a hand rail at the back of the open cab added. It was sprayed a bauxite red colour and given a wash of black ink then dry brushed with light grey. Despite filling every available space with lead the little Wasp needs careful driving over the dead frog points on the layout. The driver figure is a Tamiya soldier civilianised with the aid of a scalpel and file.

The greenhouse and fuel tank are just roughly positioned at this stage.



I also bodged a freelance shunter using a Hornby 0-4-0 chassis, it runs quite well given its humble origin, with a hand held feed back controller. The body on this is also filled with lead in every little crevice. The driving wheels are now hidden behind full skirts which improves it appearance, it is not used much but kept in reserve.
Both these locos are fitted with link and pin couplers which work very well with the KD’s The pin being a U shaped bit of paper clip, a bit crude but it works.
In the photo the loco is seen pushing a wagon past the water tower and coaling stage.

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Flushed with the success of how well the Opel Blitz performed I started looking round for other suitable trucks to modify. A trip to my local shop yielded nothing but a look in an Italeri catalogue showed a Chevrolet short wheel base truck I thought rather attractive. I remember as a child a local farmer delivering loads of logs in the winter time with one of these.
I ordered one and when it arrived found it to be a little shorter than I thought it would be.
Undaunted I made a chassis out of plasticard to fit an Athearn switcher chassis. I found by trial and error that I needed to lengthen the body to suit the plasticard chassis. I inserted a large toolbox box between the cab and the body. I cut out bits of the body floor, cab floor and engine bulkhead to get the body to fit over the Athearn chassis. After much cutting, filling and checking, I got it to fit. I put the model on the layout and disaster.
It looked ridiculous, it sat far too high. I put it to one side and had a rethink.



The answer to my problem was a Bachmann Brill Trolley chassis. It fitted quite well and with its much smaller wheels looked right.

The Chevrolet looks about right to my eye and runs remarkably well, only one truck is powered but it picks up current with all eight wheels.

Last edited on Wed Oct 6th, 2010 07:04 pm by Broadoak

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An early view of the Chevy before the canvas hood was fitted, the tarpaulin covered box in the back of the truck hides the motor.



A front view of the Chevrolet and Opel trucks in the yard before starting the days work.

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On another trip to the model shop I came across an Opel Blitz truck but one powered by a gas producer. It looked more old fashioned that the Opel I already had with a 1930’s look about it.

This truck is powered by a Con-Cor chassis from a model I’ve had for years but used very rarely because of its awful over scale handrails. I removed the front drive shaft and flywheel to get it to fit under the body of the truck. A tarpaulin covered box in the back of the truck hides the motor, flywheel and drive shaft. Like the other Opel the body is held in place by self tapping screws pushing against the sides of the can motor.

The truck body was sprayed grey and washed over with watery black Indian ink. The wings (fenders) and radiator cowl were painted black. Splashes of mud and rust are represented by dry brushing rust colour paints on. Ropes and chains and rolled up tarpaulins were added to give the vehicle a bit of extra character.









Originally it was fitted with a KD coupler at the front but because the rail truck is rather longer than the other Opel Blitz it swings out too much and was a menace in the yard. The truck has now been demoted to taking fuel, spares and general running about on the estate.

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Having a few wagons and odd bits of motive power I thought I would do a bit more work on the structures. I decided to paint both the main workshop and the small engine shed a grey asbestos cement colour, as I thought it unlikely that a farm would go to the trouble of painting them. Looking at asbestos buildings locally showed they had a sort of orange coloured lichen growing on some of them, easily replicated with a blob of paint.
The walls were lined with balsa and some shelves put up. An Italeri kit provided a bench and many of the tools in the workshop. There are lubrication charts on the walls, these are reduced copies of the real thing. Both tractors in these pictures are actually diesels on trial and make the date the early 1960’s. The earlier TVO powered tractors I have are rather delicate white metal kits. I usually have an example of both old and new at exhibitions.
The two mechanics are Tamiya military figures that have had hats added to them then painted to look as if they are wearing overalls. Most working men in the 1950’s wore hats.
The black tank next to the workshop is for the storage of TVO as most tractors during the early fifties started on petrol and when the engine was warm changed over to TVO. It is made from odds and ends in the spares box.



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The coal stage in the foreground is a basic box shape made of Tamiya battle damaged walls cut into sections and glued together with MEK. The corrugated iron is actually the inner wrapper of cup holders we use at work. I found this material by accident one morning after an holder had been left out in the rain overnight and had delaminated. It was painted with several coats of grey with a little silver paint added, when dry it was touched up here and there with various rust colours. The corrugated iron sheets are held in place with wooden corner posts and rusty wire. There is some crushed real coal on the loading platform which is made of coffee stirrers. A few tools are found there, shovels, a coal hammer and a pick. The coal is carried on the footplate of the only steam locomotive the farm has in small sacks.

The wood be chopped is for starting the fire in the Porter loco, she helps out at harvest time when things get very busy.

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Good lookin rust on the iron!

Herb  :old dude:

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A picture taken in the early days from the operating side of the layout giving a view not normally seen by the public.

The small water tower is made from odds and ends in the scrap box mainly and parts of an Airfix bridge plastic kit. The platform the tank sits on is a few more wooden coffee stirrers from work. The tank itself is from an HO scale re-fuelling facility. The box housing the controls is made of balsa. The other bits are an assortment of wire, chain and masking tape. The tape is used to make the leather bag for filling the loco’s tank. It is also used to simulate the lagging on the rising main which feeds the tank. These are painted in appropriate greyish brown colours.




Before and after photos.

The bridge with the cows being driven over for afternoon milking hides the fiddle yard entrance. The cows are actually Britain’s Jerseys, but a farmer friend told me they look more like Friesians, they are too big and the wrong shape for Jerseys. So I re-painted them by spraying them white then painting on black patches in a random fashion. I finished them off by painting the udders a very pale pink and touching in their eyes, noses and hoofs. The cows are clean at the rear end as it is summer. They only get really mucky in winter when they have to be kept inside.

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The foreman’s hut/office is a scale model of the huts we used to have at work. It is made of strips of balsa wood with a corrugated iron roof, the same material as the coal stage sides. The door is set in the open position to show the interior detail. There is a small stool and a bench with paperwork, a mug, a clipboard hanging up, and some bread and cheese.

The foreman figure is a modified Tamiya German soldier. He has obviously cycled to work on the day the photo was taken.

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Peter,

Your trucks are absolutely wonderful!

JdF

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Great job on the tiny details that hold interest!


Herb  :old dude:

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John,

Praise from a modeller of your calibre is very welcome indeed. Many thanks, you have made my day.

There are still a couple of trucks to describe.



The cold frame itself is a mix of balsa and plasticard with the vegetables being made of Milliput and painted with green acrylics. One of the panes of glass is broken, a bit hackneyed I know, but the children seem to like it.

The Davenport in as new condition is seen passing with a nominal train of sacks of wheat.

The farm grows potatoes, wheat and sugar beet and rotates the crops annually to prevent disease. It also keeps cattle, sheep and pigs their manure being used to improve the soil.





The ON30 scale Davenport when purchased was fitted with the DCC gubbins. This has now been removed and a blanking chip put in and this has transformed its running for the better.

When this photograph was taken only very slight modifications had been done. The cab height had been increased to clear a standing 1/32 scale figure. The control cluster in the cab was raised and a couple of handrails added and the model lightly weathered. Since then a few more changes have been made. An air cleaner and fuel filler have been added to the bonnet top. In the cab a reversing lever and brake wheel have been added, these can’t really be seen but I know they are there! It has also had a bit more weathering added to give a work stained appearance.

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The farm estate that Two Sister’s Farm is very loosely based on had some twenty odd miles of main line and ten miles of sidings all of it two feet gauge. It had a connection with the GER and a facility for loading the crops (mainly potatoes) into lorries as well.
In reality they had an assortment of Simplex locos and ex First World War rolling stock.
I felt the need to build something that could be used to haul these main line trains to the railhead or road interchange. As with the rail trucks I wanted something a little different.
That is how the yellow beast came about. It is totally freelance and is supposed to have a Gardner four cylinder diesel engine which drives a small generator which in turn powers the rear bogie which has two traction motors. The front bogie is un-powered and is purely for load carrying and braking. All this is fiction of course.
The device is seen here with a side tipper used to transport lime out to the fields to
improve the quality of the soil.





The model runs on an Athearn switcher chassis, this time with the rear drive shaft disconnected to give a bit more room in the cab area. The body has bits of its original donor loco, a Baldwin S12 with the cab removed and doors and handles on the bonnet sides added. The cab like the tractors of that time is open to the elements. It has a KD coupler at one end and a link and pin at the other. The driver is a converted army figure with his tin helmet carved and filed to look like his hair.

The beast is seen here with a wooden side tipper on its way to the pig sties to collect the material from mucking out. A single track ran through the centre of the sties to facilitate this.



 

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A view showing the greenhouse as seen in Summer with the tomato plants being tended by a man with a white apron. They are made of a cocktail stick for the cane supporting the plant. The actual plant being thin wire covered in pva glue then dipped a mix of green flock material. When it had all dried a dab of bright red paint was applied to replicate the tomatoes.

To the left in the foreground is a scratch built short wheelbase bogie wagon with a load bales of straw for bedding in the pig sties. The full length ex-army bogie wagons from WW1 that were really used are just too long on a tiny model like mine.



The guy cleaning windows has obviously wandered off for a cup of tea and a chat with the mechanics in the workshop.
The trailer wheel is in to have a puncture repaired and is a left over part from the Opel Blitz kit.
The jerry cans and large oil drum are from a Tamiya military kit as are the sacks. The sight gauge and valve on the tank are from the spares box. The fine light coloured ground cover is a material we use at work for dealing with oil spills.

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We get a glimpse into the engine shed with its work bench and a tool box plus some parts being worked on. A vice and more tools have been added since this was picture was taken. The floor of the engine house is scribed Milliput painted a dirty black as are the sides of the rails in the shed. A set of fire irons lean against the front of the shed next to an oil drum of rubbish complete with brush and shovel. A group of oil drums containing lubricating oil sit on a balsa wood stand.
Next to the engine house is a low relief barn made of balsa wood painted with watered down Indian ink. It has a rusty corrugated iron roof and a brick base from yet another Tamiya war damaged building!

The Davenport and the Opel truck are seen patiently waiting for their next job.

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The next rail truck I built really is a bit of a critter. It is an ex - American army jeep. It is an Italeri kit and was about six pounds. I didn’t realise until I got it home and looked inside the box that it came complete with a trailer as well. Excellent value I thought. It sits on an ON30 Bachmann Street Car chassis, which is rather high. But the Bachmann chassis was brand new and on offer at only £20 so I am prepared to put up with the extra height. It runs very smoothly and slowly, I must admit I’m a bit of an old woman about slow running.





In the two pictures above the ground cover was still being added a bit at a time at that stage.
The horse drawn device hidden under the tarpaulin is actually part of a German army field kitchen. The tarpaulin which is kitchen towel soaked in pva, then painted with acrylics when dry. This is then washed over in a thin coat of watery dark grey, this runs into the creases and gives it more definition. When this is dry a light flick over with a little cream on
a dry brush. Like this the implement could be anything. Wonderful thing the imagination.




The jeep being rather small really does sit on the chassis and to give it a bit more character I added a load carrying platform behind the four seats. The vehicle is fitted with link and pin couplers so can be used to push or pull small trains when needed. The driver figure is a white metal tractor driver from Scaledown models, he also adds a bit more weight.
It reminded me of a vehicle which worked on the Dennis estates at Nocton Lincs. It was a strange looking car type paraffin-fired steam engine device.
The model is used by the foreman to get urgently needed fuel or spares out into the fields.

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Peter-that Jeep loco is excellent! While my railroad has an old Ford Model T, I can appreciate "modern" power. I may have to find one of those Bachmann trolleys, I sure like the power truck.



Here is "Little Bill" on the line. The super is out with his pooch "Bunky" on a track inspection run.

                    Woodie

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I am glad you like the jeep railcar Woodie, I must admit I do like the unusual.

I like your Ford model T rail truck for the same reason, it looks unusual. I like the exposed engine, it sets the model off somehow. Nice little scene as well. How is ” Little Bill powered“?

The contrast between the two layouts is interesting yours looking dry and dusty and mine looking a little more green and lush.

If I remember correctly the Bachmann model was an ON30 scale closed street car.

On mine the jeep body is held on by two screws going through the ends of the chassis which is about 95mm long overall. The wheel centres are 42mm approx. It has a five pole motor so it runs very well.

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Peter-Little Bill was made from a Lindberg 1:32 Model T and has a Falhauber geared motor driving a Grandt Line 2:1 crossbox. There is a 7.4 volt rechargable battery under the tarp and a radio control board under the car. Top speed is est. 7 SMPH. I just love railcars.

               Woodie

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The jeep trailer seen in the very early days, I painted it a dark well rusted colour and it stands leaning on a fence next to the tractor workshop on the right hand side. It is full of rusting junk, farmers seem reluctant to throw things away. More junk, long grass ( old shaving brush bristles ) and foliage were added with a liberal soaking of pva to help secure the tree to the baseboard.

Last edited on Mon Oct 11th, 2010 09:17 am by Broadoak

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A Fordson E27N, my favourite tractor, in a lightly weathered state. I remember as a lad sitting on one that my cousin used to drive. The smell of a tractor running on paraffin (kerosene) instantly takes me back to my childhood. Note the workshop starting to fill up with clutter and the lubrication chart on the wall, it’s for the E27N actually.



The loading dock made of balsa and painted with acrylics. The sacks are Tamiya sand bags and the milk churn is a Britain’s item. The bike leaning against the barn is from a Tamiya Military kit.
The long grass is made from tinted shaving brush bristles.

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A close up of the Opel Blitz truck showing the KD coupler fitted to the front.
These truck kits after conversion yield a load of useful bits for the scrap box, items like axles wheels and even a complete engine. The latter I’ve used as a load on one of the little Side- line four wheel wagons. It makes a visual change from sacks of potatoes.

All of the high resolution photographs and most of the close ups were taken by my friend and fellow operator at shows, Andy Knott.



The second picture shows the Opel pushing a loaded scratch built freelance bogie wagon. It uses bogies (trucks) from an old HO scale Bachmann boxcar.

I use mostly the smaller 4 wheel wagons at exhibitions as they take up less room. Many of the real farms used the smaller wagons as they were mostly powered by horses.




 

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The Chevrolet truck and its Bachmann Brill chassis performed very well being both smooth and slow running. On my layout pulling power is not an issue but I do like decent slow running. I looked around for another truck that I could motorise using the same chassis. I had long fancied the American Army 6 x 6 GMC truck to convert to a rail truck. I ordered one and the Brill trolley I was going to power it with from my local model shop.






It has a slightly smaller can motor with a gearbox and is quite heavy. The chassis to give an idea of its size is 110mm long but has been modified to suit the model, in this case the GMC truck. Exactly the same chassis was used in the Chevrolet the wheel base of the two bogies is 65mm.



When the two eventually arrived the truck needed much more in the way of alterations to get it to fit the chassis. It was much too long for a start so a length had to be removed from the middle of the load carrying section. This left the bonnet and cab section to build more or less as the plan, apart from removing sections of the cab back, floor and engine bulkhead. The truck chassis itself had to be shortened and a sub chassis made to fit the truck body to the Brill chassis. All a bit fiddly with lots of trial and error fitting of parts. Eventually it all fitted together well and to hide the motor I did my usual trick and made a box to go over the hole in the floor where the motor intruded into the truck load compartment. The box is then covered over with a tarpaulin.

















The truck in the kit should really have a large electric powered winch mounted on the front but I thought the front looked ok without it so I fitted the winch in the back instead. It has link and pin couplers at each end. The guard around the radiator I cut so it just fitted the profile of the bonnet.



I sprayed it a rather bright yellow which I toned down with several thin dark grey washes. The canvas hood over the cab I painted with a matt oil based paint in a fawn colour then gave it a wash of very dilute Indian ink. A spare gerry can of fuel is carried each side of the cab mounted on the running boards. I then added the usual tools, shovels ropes and chains draped over various parts of the vehicle. In the load carrying area is the large tarpaulin covered crate, a forty gallon oil drum, a selection of gerry cans, a spare implement wheel some folded tarpaulins and more rope. At the very back is the electric winch mechanism.

The last photo with a view showing the electric winch fitted to the rear of the GMC rail truck on its way out to the fields. It also shows the link and pin coupling, the link being a piece of paper clip bent into a U shape. Crude I know but it works, either pushing or pulling stock fitted with KD’s
The man working on the Fordson Standard is an modified ex - German tank crew figure the hat he is wearing is made of a circle of ten thou plasticard glued to the top of his head.

Last edited on Tue Oct 12th, 2010 09:51 am by Broadoak

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Great touch, that lube chart on the shed wall-- I can remember seeing that thing a couple times as a kid.

BTW- the front winch on a GMC CCK "duce and a half" is driven by a shaft from the side of the main transmission. We have one, with a second, larger winch mounted on the deck behind the cab driven the same way. Several times I have had three foot of air between the front wheels and the ground, trying to rip out tree roots with the rear winch. Absolutely a terrible vehicle to drive down the road--underpowered, underbraked, and steering that only a gorilla would be happy with. A half hour in it (without even going out on the road) would make anyone wonder how we won WW2.




Herb  :old dude:

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Thanks Herb for the photo of the winch on the front of your truck.






A bit of a break with a selection of photographs taken at exhibitions in the layouts first year being shown in public.



The two were taken at Crewe Heritage Centre at the first exhibition I attended with Two Sister’s Farm. The light in the centre was rather odd and gave the appearance of pictures taken on an evening in Summer.
The first picture shows three tractors being checked over at the end of a hard days work.
The second shows an unusual view looking from the side of the over bridge down the yard.

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These four pictures were taken at a two day show in Corby by a guy who photographed everything on the Saturday then gave all the exhibitors a CD to keep on the Sunday.
Three of the pictures are rather unusual views looking straight down. In one the rather misty cloud I put down to exhaust smoke from the little Barclay shunter, now complete with side skirts to hide the rather toy like motion.
The young lady collecting eggs is a modern Britain’s figure that has been re-painted.








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I thought it about time I increased the size of the conventional locomotive fleet. So I made a sort of Simplex type device that might have been built in the farm’s own workshop on a chassis they had purchased second hand from the government at the end of the First World War.
The model is powered by a Model Power four wheel chassis with a vertical motor at one end and a large metal weight in the middle.



The body is totally freelance and I assumed that the farm workshop wouldn’t have the equipment to bend sheet metal so all panels are flat. The engine cover has doors each side with hinges and handles and hides the central weight. An open sided cab covers the vertically mounted motor. It has a curtain made of folded and painted masking tape to hide the fact there is no driver, there simply isn’t room for one. During the build I added small bits of lead weights wherever I could to improve the model's tracking abilities.
The front footplate has a sideways mounted radiator with a fan and drive belts behind a guard. There are top and bottom radiator hoses and even an overflow pipe. There are two sandboxes and a tool box as well as a handrail. There is another handrail and spare fuel cans mounted on the rear of the cab.
Note the strut supporting the branch this is used to prevent damage in transit, I must admit I didn‘t notice it when I took the photograph.



I sprayed the body in red primer then washed it over with diluted black Indian ink. Then I flicked a dry brush loaded with light grey over it to high light the raised areas. I hung chains and loops of rope from the hand rails to give it a little more character.
Since most of the photographs were taken (apart from the close-up back view) I’ve added a seated figure riding on the engine cover, his job is to open gates when crossing over roads.




 

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The next shunting locomotive is not to be taken seriously. I built it from a selection of unused body parts and a switcher chassis from my spares box. They came about as I have been updating my American switching layout with more modern locos and stock.


It’s a device I really don’t think there is a prototype for! The fiction is that it has a Gardner four cylinder diesel engine at one end (the right side in the photo). This drives a generator at the other end by a long shaft that passes through the middle of the loco behind the driver’s seat. It can be used as a portable generator out in the fields as well as being a conventional diesel electric to power the traction motors in both bogies.


The driver is a Siku tractor driver figure and is made of a hard but bendy plastic that is not easy to modify, so he has just been re-painted.

He is seen here returning home during harvest time late in the evening.





Last edited on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 07:24 pm by Broadoak

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All three of these pictures have been taken on my HO American switching layout. The loco is seen pulling a water tank. The latter is a much shortened Bachmannn flat car with a plastic tank and a balsa tool box added to it. I was going to make it a weed killing wagon but on the estate the weed killer of the day, sodium nitrate, not only killed the weeds it also rotted the track and metal sleepers. Much of their track was second hand from the First World war. The tracks to the fields in any photographs of the estate always look very overgrown.


I have assumed the amount of traffic in the yard keeps this area relatively weed free.

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Late last year in November and again this year in January I exhibited Two Sister’s Farm at two specialist narrow gauge shows organised by two different local groups. Not only were they very enjoyable due to the friendly informal atmosphere but also because of the variety of scales and subjects of the exhibits.


Whilst there my layout was photographed by Mick Thornton and I recently e-mailed Mick to ask permission to use a photograph to illustrate a forthcoming item in the saga. He not only gave permission but sent me a lot more of his excellent photographs as well.


If you like narrow gauge modelling Mick’s site is a must. I am sure you will enjoy the content.

Mick's Roving Reporter Photo Gallery @ fotopic.net






Here are two of Mick’s excellent photos of the layout.


The first shows the work bench in the interior of the engine shed and part of the cab of a Ruston type loco not yet described.


The second picture shows the Fordson “N” standing outside the barn workshop warming up before setting off for the fields.



 

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Due to the small size of the layout four wheel shunters are a bit more flexible so I added another to the growing fleet of locos and rail trucks.



Because the bauxite coloured Simplex type ran rather well using the Model Power Chassis I bought another.



This time I found a drawing of an armoured Simplex and used the basic dimensions to build mine with the exception of the curved sides. Again the Two Sister’s engineers shied away from curving metal and squared up the sides of the second hand ex WD chassis they had acquired. Because it was wider I was able to put more weights into each side of its plasticard footplate. The cab, engine cover, radiator are all plasticard with some Cambrian 16mm scale rivets and nuts strategically placed. Odds and ends from the spares box serve to represent parts of the engine and transmission seen below the bonnet cover. The wire grill is made from the reinforcing from some industrial tape soaked in ACC to make it rigid.



This time I sprayed it with grey primer then painted the body in a light green colour purely to make a change. It is very lightly weathered because I assumed its regular driver looks after it.

Last edited on Sun Oct 17th, 2010 03:31 pm by Broadoak

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Peter

I think that you are rapidly succumbing to the age old model railroad disease known as - morelocomotivesthancarsium.

Unfortunately there is no known cure, but it rarely becomes fatal. :bg::bg::bg:


Herb  :old dude:

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I fear you are right Herb. My only excuse as it is such a small model there isn’t much room for rolling stock so I ring the changes with a bigger fleet of locos to keep visitors at exhibitions entertained.


The bad news is I still have a few more to describe.





Last edited on Mon Oct 18th, 2010 07:13 pm by Broadoak

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The next shunter I made was powered by another Athearn switcher chassis that I had been given.



Again it is a purely freelance design and was built out of plasticard on the base Athearn switcher basic footplate that had had the body removed.



I removed one of the flywheels and a drive shaft to give more room at the back end for the cab and this allowed a seated driver figure to be fitted in.



The body is the usual bodge with a couple of doors to allow access into the engine compartment. The radiator was from an Athearn Hustler body and it is open to allow air in to keep the five pole motor cool. It’s got the usual handrails and bits of rope and chain hanging from them. It has link and pin couplers at both ends.



The body is slightly weighted, the Athearn chassis on its own is quite heavy so it is a nice slow runner.



It is painted in a faded industrial green colour with a little wear and tear weathering.

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The last conventional shunter to emerge from the works is a bit of a Rustonesque affair.


I found a side view drawing in a book called “Diesel Rail Traction” showing a Ruston and Hornsby narrow gauge tractor. It gave a few dimensions and so I was able to roughly scale the drawing up to 1/32 scale. The wheelbase was fixed at the Bachmann 44 ton bogie I was going to use to power it.


The body is my mix of plasticard and wire, working on the principle that if it looks right, it is right. It is well weighted with lead and runs rather well.



To my mind at least I think it captures the look of a little Ruston if not that dimensionally accurate.


When this bogie wears out I shall have to find something to replace it as I’m rather fond of it. A Tenshodo or Black Beetle being favourite I suppose.

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You will all be relieved to know that this is the last locomotive I have built.


It is an ex-army Canadian Ford quad gun tractor. It runs on an early Bachmann Brill trolley with a ringfield type motor. I bought the model at a local market for £5 on a stall selling all sorts of toys. The chassis had to be butchered to fit the short wheelbase body by cutting a length out and butt joining it and then adding some more weight in the un powered front truck that also collects current to improve its tracking.
The model is photographed on the joining section of the HO switching layout.

As the model of Two Sister’s is supposed to be summer the canvas cover on the roof is rolled back showing the driver in his shorts. Jerry cans, ropes, lower footboards and a tool box have been added to give the model a little more character.
The rear view shows a steel hawser from an electric winch with a loop for emergency towing emerging from its roller guides. The rope can be used as an alternative. The quad has six seats so is used to take workers out to the fields. A large box inside the back of the vehicle actually covers the power truck but on the model is supposed to cover the electric winch mechanism, an early example of Health and Safety perhaps.
The rolled canvas is made from kitchen towel soaked in pva glue then allowed to dry. It is then painted with acrylics and when that is dry a wash of dark grey put on. When this is dry it is flicked over with a very light grey using a dry brush.












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One of the biggest problems I’ve found working in 1/32-1/35 is finding suitable figures. There seem to be two basic sources. The first are 1/32 scale figures intended for the tractor collecting community. There are serious collectors of the more detailed and delicate models, the rest of course are sold as children’s toys. Mostly these depict seated figures with one or two from the Britain’s range being standing figures. They are made of a hard flexible plastic that is not easy to modify. These are all 1/32 scale.



The other source are military figures who in the main are wearing a uniform of some sort. These can be modified with a scalpel and files but it isn’t easy. These are all 1/35 scale.






The photos show a couple of examples of the modified military figures. The first shows a dairy man driving cows over the bridge for afternoon milking. The hat he is wearing is a circle of ten thou plasticard with a hole cut in it to fit over his head and thus form the brim of his hat. I think more people wore hats in the 1950’s, the period of the model than do nowadays. Incidentally the scale cow pats are blobs of solder painted a greenish black.

The mechanic checking the tyre pressures on this Fordson E1A is from a Tamiya tank repair crew and had his hat made in the same way as the man herding the cows. The tractor, an early diesel example is being demonstrated on the farm.

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Hi Peter,

take a look at Preiser figures for gauge 1, scale 1:32. Can't find a dealer in the UK at the moment, but here is an US one to get the picture:

http://www.eurorailhobbies.com/erh_list.asp?mn=10&sc=1&ca=29

I like your work, especially the diesel shunters :thumb: and the funky look of the layout. But I wonder why the canadian ford still needs camouflage lighting? :bg:

Michael


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Hi Michael,

Thank you for the link for the Preiser people, I believe they are available over here but are very expensive.

With regard to the camouflage light on the Canadian Ford I thought it looked more interesting that’s all. Actually I think he is probably my favourite.

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A Massey Ferguson 35 a 3cylinder diesel tractor outside the workshop. Another new tractor on trial on the estate in 1958. It is intended for yard work and light carting, certainly not for cultivating the heavy Lincolnshire clay soil. The model is a Universal Hobbies example and is mainly die cast metal with plastic accessories.

The tractors are not glued in place but are moved around as the fancy takes me. This was bought as the colour is a contrast to the mainly blue painted Fordson fleet.

Two views showing the tractor being checked over by a mechanic wearing brown overalls before starting the day’s work.

The second picture is taken from the fiddle yard looking towards the other end of the layout all of 38.5 inches away.

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A general view looking down the yard towards the engine shed and barn. This one is taken looking in the same direction as the previous photograph. Both were taken in the conservatory which explains the rather bright light.

A close up of the engine shed in the early days before the vice on the bench were added. A loaded wagon waiting to be taken to the crew yard with a load of animal feed and bedding.

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A view of the yard foreman’s hut and his cold frame he uses to grow vegetables.


All of the photographs up to this point were taken a while ago.


During this Summer while things have been fairly quiet on the exhibition front a few more have been taken.

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Things have been quiet on the exhibition front during the summer but with the next show just a month away I thought checking the layout was a good idea.


It is stored in the same spare bedroom as the HO switching layout under a cover made from black plastic. It is odd but despite being completely covered it always manages to get a bit dusty.


I set the layout up and ran the Quad gun tractor for the first time to check clearances before going public with it. It was fine as I thought it would be, although the clearance under the bridge is a little bit tight.











Whilst the layout was set up I took advantage of the situation and took a few photographs as it hasn’t been photographed for some time.



 

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The Davenport arrives in the yard pushing a wagon with an engine on it that has come in for some much needed attention in the work shop. The modifications to the little locomotive can clearly be seen and make it look a little different to the norm. It has also now had a little more weathering applied. The engine and other items on the wagon are left over bits from the truck conversions.

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The view looking down on the group shows a couple of modified ex military figures discussing a problem with the driver of the Davenport.



The problem solved, we see the loco depart with the man standing on the footplate. It was obviously taken in the era before health and safety became an issue. You may remember it, we just used common sense in those days.


 

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The Simplex type loco arrives pushing a minimal train. The man hitching a ride on the engine cover opens gates at level crossings and is a 1/32 scale Siku tractor driver. He is made of a flexible hard plastic that is not easy to cut or glue. I have moved both his arms down slightly by making cuts at the shoulder joint then repositioning the arms. I found super glue worked by making several small applications and keeping the joint under pressure. Paint then hid the join.

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The Quad arrives from the fields one evening having picked up the tractor drivers.
The seated figure in front of the coal stage is another ex military character with a tiny Labrador puppy inside his shirt.
The children like this when counting how many animals there are on the model. It keeps them occupied while the adults watch the trains.

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Broadoak wrote:

The real Quad HAD to be designed by a Star Wars fan!


Herb:old dude:

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I don’t think Star Wars was even heard of when the guy invented the quad Herb.

A selection of photographs taken at our last exhibition a few weeks ago. They were taken by Andy Knott my fellow operator.



The picture shows the wood chopper taking a rest with his Labrador puppy in his shirt.

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This one features a Fordson EIA Power Major warming up before starting the days work.

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The guy with the puppy in his shirt looked familiar...and I know why! He has visited Mogollon before and was involved in a high stakes poker and drinking tournament. Plus, he used shoe polish on his hair so nobody would recognize him.



He's the lone guy with his back to the camera, but he does still have that doggie with him. The fellow across the table is a "rough customer" and the other man is a dead ringer for Muj. As I recall, after the game, the gent wandered down to the Gila Hotel for some more "fun".

                                 Woodie

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We have a saying over here, “great minds think alike” Woodie.



The guy with the little puppy is one of a group of four German tank personnel made by Master Box. I found them quite by accident when my local model shop changed hands and started specialising in military modelling. Master box make one or two other civilians as well as a few ladies, candidates for your bordello perhaps.

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An unusual view taken from the top of a storage barn next to the engine shed looking down the yard towards the fiddle yard end of the layout.



A Simplex type loco is propelling a train of wagons loaded with sacks of wheat into the yard.



The quad is parked outside the greenhouse and will depart shortly to the fields to bring back the tractor drivers after their day’s work.

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Note the ex-US army jeep trailer full of rusting junk behind the horse drawn implement.


Farmers over here never seem to throw anything away they just hang on to it.

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Peter-yes, 2 of the Gila Ladies are Master Box "WW2 girls and soldiers" figures. Very nice products, I hope they make more different sets.

                         Woodie

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The boss has wandered down to the yard mid morning for a look round. He is a Britain’s hard plastic figure that I’ve removed the base from, so he is glued to the base board. Other than a dark grey wash to tone him down a little he is more or less as purchased.


The long grass is actually the bristles from a cheap shaving brush tinted with acrylics.

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While the boss stands daydreaming a man with an apron is picking tomatoes in the green house. He will put them in boxes and then onto a two foot gauge flat wagon and then push them wagon manually the length of the green house. A two foot gauge track ran the length of the green house in the centre.

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A mechanic in faded brown overalls peers at the rear tyre of a Fordson E27N while a chicken hunts round for scraps behind the horse drawn implement.



Note the lack of a three point linkage on the tractor, it was trailed ploughs for cultivation in those days I guess.

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Peter
   Great looking stuff. I like the things that a person can readily identify with. When you add the touches that seem really common it adds a great touch. By the way farmers here are the same way. Everything they ever owned can be found in some form or other just rusting away.
                                                                                              Clif K

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A couple of shots showing a little of the detail in the workshop and the Fordson having his rear tyres inflated.

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To finish off a picture of the engine needing repair having been detached from the Simplex outside the engine shed.




The Davenport idling in the yard waiting for its next job.


And that gentlemen is it, the layout tour is over, thank you for looking.


I am still looking for more unusual vehicles to run on the farm. I have a small pick up truck as the next project to make during the winter.


It’s fun to operate and something not to be taken too seriously.

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I have never been very happy with the appearance of either the Porter 0-4-2 locomotive or the wooden side tippers. They are all Bachmann ON30 scale models, the locomotive has been modified slightly to make it look more 1/32 scale but the wagons have not. I wanted them to have a rather neglected look about them but not too rusty or decrepit as they are all still used. With the side tippers I basically painted the wooden sections a variegated pale greys and then applied thin washes of black to represent unpainted wood. The iron work being picked out in various rust shades.

With the locomotive it was washes of rust colours over the metalwork and the same treatment as the wagons with the woodwork. I am now more pleased with their appearance, I think they look a little more interesting than they originally did.

The photographs were taken on my HO scale switching layout.








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Making her debut on Sunday at Barton le Cley, this is Tilly, the latest addition to the farm’s growing fleet of unusual vehicles. It is an ex Second World War 10 HP light utility car with a pick up body. She is used for track maintenance purposes and not general haulage.

The kit is made by Tamiya and is rather delicate with many parts being a poor fit. I have left the bonnet off to show the details in the engine bay, as it seemed a pity to hide them.

I made a false chassis to attach and locate the body to the power unit which is from an HO Bachmann HI-rail track maintenance van. The body has a solid block of plasticard at the back of the false chassis which was drilled and tapped. One long screw then holds the two together. It has little out rider wheels which also pick up current. I added extra weight in any place I could to help it track better.

Some of the photographs were taken on my HO scale switching layout.

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Andy Knott my fellow operator took a few photos on Sunday at the Barton Le Cley show.
The first two are of the new track maintenance vehicle arriving back in the yard having spent the day adding sidings from the main line into the fields ready for the potato harvest.
The model runs much better than I thought it would.

The other shows the Simplex at rest during a lunch break, the tomatoes look about ready for picking.







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Mick Thornton a photographer well known in narrow gauge modelling circles has very kindly sent me some excellent photographs he took the exhibition we did at Barton le Clay. I know he is not very pleased with them but I’m sure you will agree, they look fine.

They illustrate a typical busy day in Two Sister’s Farm yard.






















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A few general views of the yard taken by Andy at the St Neots Cambs. exhibition last weekend before the visitors arrived.

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The latest rail truck has a Zvezda GAZ-AAA Russian 1/35 scale kit of a Ford based lorry as a basis. The real trucks were built under license in Russia during the second World war. Because the prototype is a small vehicle I used the three axle truck to give a little more length, the two axle version being very short.


I must admit I am a little dissapointed with the way this has turned out. It has one saving grace however, it runs superbly and I’m happy to make allowances for decent running.


The kit was inexpensive and turned out to be rather poor with regard to the fit and quality of many parts. The clear plastic windows being especially troublesome. But with a lot of fiddling and cutting I eventually managed to get it to fit a Con-Cor switcher chassis.


It is a kerosene tanker for refuelling the tractors out in the fields. The tank is actually an HO scale Walthers Oil Terminal item I have modified to suit its new role. I added flat shelves to the body sides to hold the refuelling pipes and a couple of wooden boxes for tools. The hand rails are made from paper clips and the rubber refuelling pipes are resin cored solder.


The exhaust pipe and silencer I have move and now is fitted to the front of the vehicle to minimise the fire risk.









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I have another exhibition at Stowmarket in a couple of weeks time so I set the layout up to check clearances and the running of the Fordson rail truck. The controller I use on Two Sister’s Farm gives slightly slower running than a similar model on the switching layout I used for testing the machine originally.




I am pleased to say it runs very slowly and smoothly if a little noisily. I think this is due to the feedback controller.




I have added a few more bits and dusted it over with chalks. I wanted to see what it looked like in an agricultural setting. I think the flash used in the photos make the driver look a little paler than he really is. In fact it probably makes all the colours look a little lighter than they are in the flesh.
















Last edited on Sat Apr 30th, 2011 07:54 am by Broadoak

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Andy my ever reliable helper took a few photos while we were at the Rushden show on Saturday last. They serve to illustrate a couple of minor additions I have made to the Fordson rail tractor. They are the addition a throttle control rod to the carburettor and a control rod to the magneto for the advance retard device.

The Porter has had the high bulkhead between the footplate and the boiler removed which has I think improved its appearance. Another figure has been added as company for the driver.

The last photo shows the Simplex type machine at rest in the yard. I am always pleasantly surprised how well this runs given its humble origins.











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Some pictures taken at Spalding Lincolnshire a couple of weeks ago by the organising club’s official photographer. They are a bit different from the ones usually posted as they show what the layout looks like to the paying public.

The show had well over 4000 visitors over the two days.

Peter M

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I did a two day show at Reading Berkshire last October and on the Sunday when things quietened down in the late afternoon I had a wander round. I found on the organising club’s stand a box of mixed figures all in different scales. I bought two 1/32 scale figures for 50 pence. They were un-painted and made of a hard white plastic. They both had thick bases and quite a lot of flash. After a lot of work with a scalpel and various files they have cleaned up quite well. I have no idea who made them as I wouldn’t mind getting some more.

I painted both with acrylics and placed them on the layout these pictures show the two figures.



The elderly mechanic in grubby brown overalls with fuel can.





The owner’s brother in a duffle coat, deer stalker and with a walking stick

has just cadged a lift on one of the freelance shunters.

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Hi Peter

Thanks for saying hello over at the Mogollon.

I have seen your layout on the forum, and like it very much.

Having spent a fortune on 1/4" & 1/2" stuff in the past, one of the atractions of 3/8" is the large amount of 'funky-junk' available from all sorts of places.

I am also interested in getting into figure painting & am collecting a few 54mm figures at present.

I bet your layout has 'ruffled a few rivet-counters' at the UK shows.
I like the way you've taken the US 'anything goes' attitude in logging; and set it on an English farm.
GREAT !!!

I'm laughing to myself at the moment, as when I was a kid, my toys were Airfix soldiers & Britains farm & animal stuff.
I thought 'that size' was for kids & couldn't wait to 'get out' onto smaller scales.

Oh well, back to where I started from I guess !!!

Cheers

Si.

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I haven’t posted anything about Two Sister’s Farm for ages so I hope Mick Thornton (A photographer well known in narrow gauge circles) doesn’t mind but here are three of his excellent photographs. They were taken at NG South Exhibition Sparsholt College, Winchester on 14th April this year.





It was a most enjoyable exhibition with something to suit all tastes for the many visitors.









Peter M

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Hi Peter

Great photos as always !

Cheers

Si.

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Having been recently diagnosed as having Polymyalgia, this I think explains why my hands are not as dexterous as they once were.

While I am still able I thought I would catch up on a few jobs I have been meaning to do but haven’t got round to. It is a couple of months before my next exhibition which is at Milton Keynes on Saturday 16th February so there was no rush.

The first of these jobs being to make some slight additions to the very first rail truck I made, the Opel Blitz.

The original false chassis I have strengthened as I always felt this to be a weak spot.

The fuel tank on the actual vehicle was mounted sideways across the chassis just behind the cab. Due to the Athearn chassis arrangement I had to relocate it and mounted it to the nearside chassis rail. I then hid it behind a coil of rope as I never felt it looked right due to its shape as much as anything. I have now made two new fuel tanks one either side and I think these look much better. I’ve also made a small shelf at the rear on the near side to store odds and ends.

I have fitted a KD coupler to the rear to make the vehicle a bit more versatile and also two sand boxes at the front.

A white meaning less number has been applied to the drop side body at the rear, it serves to add a bit of colour.

I cleaned the motor commutator with a cotton wool bud and gave all the bearings a touch of La belle oil. Although well over twenty years old the motor seems to run better than ever.







Peter M

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Great stuff as always Peter.
Love the red & green colours.
Iron-work looks 'super-real'.

Guess she'll be rollin' out the shops, to the farm soon !

Cheers

Si.

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I have done a bit more work on a couple more members of my locomotive fleet.

Firstly I added a KD coupler to the front of the quad gun tractor, making it a bit more useful around the farm.

The model is powered by an early 3 pole Ringfield pancake type motor, which runs every bit as well as the later enclosed can and fly wheel motor now fitted. A bit of added weight in the body helps I think.

The model is seen posing in the fiddle yard of my HO switching layout.



The other little modification was a sort of “shall I, shan’t I “ decision I couldn’t make up my mind.

In the end decided to remove the rather large headlight mounted on the front of the smoke box. Having done it I’m glad did, not only does it make the little locomotive look more British but I think it improves the general look of it as well.

It now reminds me of the 0-4-ST locomotive built by Steven Lewin, Dorset Foundry, Poole, Dorset in 1863 to work at Seaham Harbour Durham.





Peter M

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Merry Christmas Peter !

More top-stuff, as always.

Cheers.

Si.

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Broadoak wrote: In the end decided to remove the rather large headlight mounted on the front of the smoke box. Having done it I’m glad did, not only does it make the little locomotive look more British but I think it improves the general look of it as well. It does much increases the "British-ness" of loco, at least from this Missouri Yank's perspective.
Also expect that a loco in kind of service that one is wouldn't carry a headlight unless specifically needed for a task - what's not there doesn't break and hence won't cost money.

Broadoak wrote:
Having been recently diagnosed as having Polymyalgia, this I think explains why my hands are not as dexterous as they once were.
Had to look that up, http://www.rheumatology.org/practice/clinical/patients/diseases_and_conditions/polymyalgiarheumatica.asp
It would definitely add a wrinkle to the fabric.

Last edited on Thu Dec 27th, 2012 01:53 am by Kitbash0n30

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The old red bodied Simplex with the man riding on the bonnet never looked quite right to me. So I have made a new body out of plasticard which is supposed to represent wooden panelling. It is very loosely based on a device which is pictured in Stewart Squires excellent Lincolnshire Potato Railways book. The body on mine is lower to clear the bridge into the fiddle yard. The one in the book looks as if you could stand up on the footplate, mine caters for a seated driver only. I have also fitted KD’s to make operating it a little easier.

The load on the home made pallet is made of odds and ends from my scrap box and makes a change from sacks of potatoes or wheat.









Peter M

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Looks great on the farm Peter.

I like that little car with the engine/pump load.

Two Sister's Farm ROCKS !!!

Cheers.

Si.

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:P fine work i like it

Frank the trainman

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Hi Frank,

Thank you for your interest in Two Sister's Farm.

It is just a bit of fun really and not to be taken too seriously.

Regards Peter M

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The proprietor of Two Sister's Farm...

...English eclectic eccentric...

...undoubtedly !


Practical...

...yep !


Wheels not circular & off axis...

...NO !!


Reciprocal motion...

...Mmmm...

...perhaps.


Definately my cuppa char.


All the best Peter

Cheers

Si.

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Sadly my old PC died a couple of weeks ago so I have had to get a replacement. Among the features I didn't have before was the option to change colour photos to black and white or sepia. The new PC has this option so I thought I would give it a try.
I thought it would give a few of my pictures a sort of period look. With such a small layout there is not a lot more you can do. Overall I think I prefer the sepia look.






Peter M

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Yes, I like them. They make the fine work have that "period" look. How about some more?

Woodie

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Nice pix Peter !

Very 'old proto photo' look.

I do love your colouring & weathering on the layout though.

Reminds me of when Railway Modeller was printed mostly in B&W...
...gone are those days; these days !

Cheers

Si.

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I have to say that the sepia look is a refreshing change, sometimes.

Like anything else, moderation is the key.

Herb

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Hi again Peter

I can see by my comment on page 10...
...I have already admired the GMC engine !
Looks GREAT as a load on the skip chassis.

I dunno if it's just me, but it almost looks smallish ??
Perhaps this is the 32/35 difference.
I am still wrestling with the new size/scale.

'O' scale Kadee's, Vs. 'HO' scale for example.
The Kadee's look fine on your stuff Peter...
...but on my bench the ones on Bachmann On30 stuff look too small next to a 1:35 figure ... ARHG!
The 'O' scale couplers, now, look too BIG.

Maybe L&P's ?

It looks like the Athearn chassis on your Opel Blitz is EXACTLY the same as the one from the S-12 I have.
I seem to remember it runs well.

You mentioned limited figure's available.
I have a few of different sorts.

I got these ones just recently though...
Kids Globe set # 571931 & another # set, similar.
Both are very-nice 1:32 'farm style' figures; complete with cool-tools, like a chain-saw, leaf-blower, buckets etc. etc. as add on extras.
Quite nicely painted already; bit of weathering needed.
Look pretty nice; soft placky, easy to bend/cut.
Well worth checking out; & fairly cheap too.
I got my 2 sets from 'scalefarm.com'
They have all sorts of other stuff as well...
...little bits & bobs etc.

Cheers

Si.

I am actualy after an old-tractor as well...
...Herb seems to know quite a bit about these.
& the Miniart 1:35 farm carts look nice, for an older period.

TOO MUCH fun !

All the best.

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2013 has not been a good year for electronic devices for me. Firstly my old computer died after some eight years use then the screen died and now my wife's compact camera has cried enough also. Although to be honest it has taken many images over the last thirteen years so I shouldn't complain really.

I have never owned a digital camera, I always borrowed the one belonging to my wife in the past. With that no longer working I have had to lash out on a device of my own.
These are a few images I have taken with the new camera while testing the layout and stock in readiness for some forthcoming exhibitions.




Peter M

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I must admit I am very pleased with the Camera, it is a compact Canon and was on offer at half price. Its performance when used for close ups seems especially good. The image files are very large and I was concerned about reducing them so that I could post the photographs.
So here are a few more.



The area under the rear wheel arch looked a little bare on the Quad so I added a small air tank and its associated piping on the offside. On the near side I added a small wooden toolbox.

The men outside the workshop put me in mind of a formula one team waiting for their car to pit for tyres and re-fuelling.



The men now have something to do checking over the two tractors before they set off for a days work.



A Bachmann V tipper chassis and a rudimentary wooden body made of plasticard with an engine and other items piled on it to be repaired in the workshop.



It's Sunday morning and a quiet period in the yard, with the wooden bodied Simplex and Tilly resting between assignments.

Peter M

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I have reset the camera to the M2 setting which gives images from 400odd kb to 700 odd kb instead of 5 mb. This means I can save more images on the memory card.
The only thing I'm not too keen on is the instruction manual which is on disc and not hard copy, but then I am very old fashioned and I was a printer in my working life.

The quality is nearly as good from a posting pictures point of view as can be seen from the following pictures.



[img]http://s20.postimg.org/680bdmaa5/IMG_0038.jpg
[/img]



Peter M

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Ya done good with the new camera. Pictures are very sharp. Always a pleasure to see your little railroad.

Bernd

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Thank you Bernd, I am pleased you approve.

I also have a small USA outline switching layout called Benson.
See Operations at Benson thread.

Or A tour of Colonel's Crossing and Benson in the HO scale thread.

Peter M

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Peter, just wonderful photos of excellent work. I love the farm and the critters that inhabit it. More photos pease...

Woodie

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:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:

5 Mooses as usual Peter !!!!!

I hear on the grape-vine; you might be at Swanley this coming Saturday; with 2 Sister's Farm.

All the best.

Cheers

Si.

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Many thanks Woody and Si, and yes I will be at Swanley this coming Saturday.


Peter M

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As is usually the way, while searching for something else I have found a CD with a few pictures taken at the second exhibition I did with Two Sisters way back in 2008.
I was on my own and a friend operated the layout while I had a quick sandwich. The photographs were taken whilst I was not there by someone I think called Neil, whose second name I do not know.

As you can see I had less variety of forms of motive power in those days.









Peter M

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Some pictures taken by David Pennington at ExpoNG exhibition at Swanley.
David has kindly given me permission to post them.







Peter M

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Peter, it's great to see the farm from another angle or three. Exquisite detaiing, I just wish that I could see it close up and personal! I am sure that it is a crowd favorite whenever you exhibit. Thanks for keeping us inspired.

Woodie

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Gee thanks Woody.


Peter M

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Hi Peter

Thanks for posting the new photos.

I was hoping to see 2 Sister's, at the weekend...
...but was unable to make it...
...doubley frustrating; since I live only several miles from Swanley.

I'm sure it went well.

All the best.

Cheers

Si.

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A few pictures taken an an exhibition at Braunstone Leicester.

I am still getting used to the camera but am very pleased with it so far.






Peter M

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Nice 'aerial photography' Peter !

A good view of all the junk in the back of the Blitz !

Cheers

Si.

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A few pictures taken at the Beds and Bucks open day last Sunday.










Peter M

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Beautiful shots, Peter. I love those tractors, are they available for less than a real tractor? Gotta get me a couple of those.

Woodie

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MOOSE
MOOSE
MOOSE
MOOSE
MOOSE
(that's 5 ***** Mooses !!!!!)

Si.

(nice)

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Hi Peter

I luv all the 2-Sisters pix already !

These are THE BISCUIT !!!

What ever you did ... KEEP DOIN' IT !!

This colour is 'naturalistic as hell' !!!

Dunno ...

... new camera ...

... outdoors shots ...

WHATEVER !!!

Colour is just WWWWWHHHAAAAAADDDOOODDDYYYYYYYYYY !!!!

Luv it !

Keep it LOCKED !

Si.

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I'm with you Woodie love those tractors. I had one just like that as a very young boy in a farm set. The way the tyres are painted with the dirt below the tread and then wiped clean on the outside is excellent you would swear it was real.
40C here today so I will be staying inside.
Rod.

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Thanks gentlemen for the kind comments about the tractors. I have always liked tractors since I was a child.

The Fordson Power Major was built from 1958 until 1960 when it was superseded by the Fordson Super Major that looked the same but had small detail changes. The model is made by Universal Hobbies and comes ready made in die cast metal and plastic. This model now costs around £22 in England.
The other tractor (the darker blue colour) is a Fordson Standard N type and these were built from the 1929 until 1945. The model is a Scaledown white metal kit and is very heavy. The kit for these now cost £78 in England.

Not sure about the availability of either model in the States Woody.

Peter M

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Two Sister's Farm will be appearing at

Hemel Hempstead Model Railway Exhibition on Saturday 25th October

From 10:30am until 4:30pm

Leverstock Green Village Hall, Leverstock Green Road,

Hemel Hempstead, HP3 8QG,

Admission: Adults £4.00, accompanied children are free.
There is free parking around the Village Hall and refreshments are available.

Layouts

Butlers Gate Crossing
  Metropolitan/GW joint in mid 1930's Buckinghamshire     OO scale   
Cucknoe
   Summer in 1960's Northamptonshire      N scale
Drive A Train
  Children's have a go opportunity      OO scale
Kaprun
  Contemporary Austrian narrow gauge     HOe scale
Pentrefan
 GWR in 1920's mid-Wales      EM scale  
Rixworth Green
  Southern Railway in 1920's Surrey/Sussex     P4 scale
Ruhestand Weg
  Austrian Railways ca 1990/2000      HO/HOe scale    
Tower Pier 
 Working signal box operation in 1955 London     EM scale             
Two Sisters Farm
 Agricultural estate railway in 1950's Lincolnshire     1/32 scale

I am always pleased to let anyone interested have a drive.

Peter M

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Hi Peter

Can I use my 35 Ohm Parma Formula-1 throttle ?

Si.

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HI Si,

Yes, why not!


Peter M

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HOLY COW !

The potato harvest will be done in a flash !

Seriously though Peter...

...I was most upset to miss the Swanley show last year.

I only live but a few miles away...

...some manure came up & hit this fan ! (to borrow an expression from the South West !)

Are you (& of course 'The Farm') going to be at Swanley this year by any chance Peter ?

All the best.

Cheers.

Si.

P.S.

Tried my train-throttle for the 1:32 slot-cars...

...ROTTEN lap-times !

Broadoak
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Si,

I'm afraid I won't be at Swanley as it clashes with the Hemel show.
It is worth a visit though if you like narrow gauge.

Peter M

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I did the Hemel Hempsted show on Saturday with Two sister's and thoroughly enjoyed it, the weather was good with a steady flow of visitors all day. There was a selection of different layouts in various scales so there was something for everyone to enjoy.
I didn't take my camera but I took a few pictures of the layout on the Friday before the show while checking it all worked, before loading it in the car.












Peter M

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Great photo's Peter. That's a nice collection of equipment.

Alwin

Broadoak
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Thanks Alwin, I'm glad you like it.

Peter M

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Is that Jeep based loco, hiding in the background something new?

I don't remember seeing it before----

Interesting, as always.

Herb




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:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:

:old dude: "NO SMOKING hombre...
...the Atcost is full of gasoline!" :mex:

:pimp: "Pimp my Willeys Peter!"

L: "What's the problem?...
...the potato-express is running LATE!" :time:

:glad: Cheers :glad:

Si. :cool:

(_!_) to mainlines !!

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Very nice!I like that Jeep-critter in the first photo.

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Thanks guys I'm glad you like the jeep.



It is actually an Italeri kit and came with a two wheeled trailer.
It runs on a Bachmann trolley chassis. The driver is a white metal tracor driver from the Scaledown range of kits, he adds some much needed weight to improve the critters's tracking.
The fiction is it is used by the yard foreman to get spares out to the fields quickly.

Peter M

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:pimp::pimp::pimp:
:pimp::pimp::pimp:
:pimp::pimp::pimp:

Si.

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:moose::moose::moose::moose::old dude:

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The little Porter is now fully Anglicised so I took a few more pictures the other morning of it at work in the yard.






Peter M

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Lovely stuff, Peter.
I was doing 1/32nd about 7 years ago, but had no space, but still prefer it to all the others.

Don't forget slot racing bodies for this scale, guys. My chum has done some nice road cars, including Volvo Amazon, SAAB 99, Land Rovers and of particular interest to our Murrican chums, a Chevy and Ford step side pick-ups , which are especially nice. All resin slot car bodies are around 25-35 pounds each, but most are very good (says the man who made over 30 masters for them:-) ). PM me for details.

There is not enough crossover between hobbies. Bit of a hobby horse of mine. For instance real scale rope is the province of model ship builders. And a flush/sunken rivet impresser for 1/32nd scale is available from ScaleModelShop for 9 quid. It's intended for flush rivets on model aircraft....and so on and so forth.

Cheers,
Martin

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Thanks Martin, I think you are right about crossover interests in hobbies. I learnt a lot by going to a meeting about model soldiers, some superb vehicles as well to give me some ideas.
We can all learn something from others I'm sure.

Regards Peter M

Last edited on Sun Dec 21st, 2014 08:15 pm by Broadoak

Broadoak
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The quad has always been popular with the public at exhibitions and it's a bit of a favourite of mine too. So one morning last week I set the layout up and had an operating session.
Now I have a decent camera taking pictures has become an enjoyable part of the session.







A few pictures of the quad shuffling wagons around the yard late one afternoon.

Peter M

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A further selection of photos taken while checking the layout over prior to an exhibition. They were taken in our conservatory which is ideal as it gives a bright all round light. With a small layout like this now that I have a decent camera taking pictures adds another dimension to modelling.











Peter M

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Peter

Number 1 is my favorite.

I have to think that you must have more locos than cars. ;)

Keep going, cobber.

Herb

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You are right Herb I do have more locos than cars. It is a tiny layout so I like a variety for the paying public to see at Exhibitions.
There is one thing for sure, no one else will have the same motive power that I have.

Peter M

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An assortment of pictures of the Fordson railtruck working in the yard on different occasions. I have assumed the drive would only be needed on one side as the driving axle would be solid. With its three forward speeds and one reverse gear it would be of limited use really.
In our model world though we don't have to worry about practicalities like that. The driver is an ex Germam tank crew member who is found relaxing and caught playing cards. I have modified the pose slightly.









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Peter,
those spud sacks look very convincing in their see-through-ness.
How did you do them?

Martin

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Very impressive Peter.

My dad brought some GN15 (if that's correct)at the Swanely show, only a couple of wagons and chassis to have a muck around with.

I'm pretty sure I've seen you on the road exhibiting before.

Kind regards Dan

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Thanks Dan, Two Sister's Farm is actually 1/32 scale not GN15. See the Gnatterbox site for ideas in that scale.

Regards Peter M

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Hi Martin,
I can't for the life of me remember where I got the sacks from, they are ready made of hard plastic. I merely painted them a sort of buff Hessian colour then gave them a thin wash of dark grey acrylic. I wish I knew where I got them as I wouldn't mind a few more.



A view looking down the yard towards the engine shed, the GMC railtruck is just setting off for a day's work in the fields.



The Opel receiving some attention while the GMC truck starts up in readiness for a days work.



The Lister towing a small Sidelines four wheeled wagon. This model is not dissimilar to some of the wagons used on the Nocton estate railway.



A contrast in fronts, three different shunters used to do the main line work. I say main line it was a track that went all round the fields and temporary track was laid into the fields at harvesting time.
On the Nocton Estate for instance on its 7800 acres there was almost 23 miles of single track. There was also track used for a large number of sidings and temporary track that brought the total to around 35 miles.

Peter M

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Peter,
it was the vertical sacks that look like they're made of some fine netting that I was interested in. The separate spuds being visible in them. Very impressive.

Martin

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Martin, Yes they are the ones that are made of plastic actually.
I think I got lucky with the painting. I always use several washes.

Regards Peter M

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Howdy Peter, I always love to see photos of your fine modeling. Please keep them coming. The bags? They look to be 1:35 scale TAMIYA #35025. I use these for processed ore ready to be shipped from a mill or smelter. Hope this helps.

Happy new year to you.
Woodie

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Thanks Woody I will see if I can get hold of some.
They are perfect to represent potatoes.

Peter M

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Peter,
They are superbly convincing!
Several washes indeed! I can't believe you get such definition with just paint!

Cheers,
Martin

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Watching from several different vantage points Peter. Great stuff as usual. Happy New Year!

Broadoak
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Thanks Ken, Happy New year to you too.

Kind Regards Peter M

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Some bales of hay which will be delivered to the extensive pig sties by the Davenport, on the Nocton estate a two foot gauge track ran down the centre of the pig sties.
This modified Bachmann On30 loco although it only has four wheels runs superbly over the dead frog points.



A birds eye view of the yard showing the very simple track layout.



A view taken standing under the bridge as a Simplex rumbles towards the camera as it sets off for another day in the fields.

Peter M

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A few more pictures I have found, taken when I first got the new camera and was testing it out.













Peter M

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Hi Peter.

Nice pixs of the farm !

That new camera & natural light together look great...

...& of course AAA modeling !

You inspired me to try my hand at a Quad...

...nice kit; fair progress on it, nowhere near done yet though.

Cheers

Si.

Those spud-sacks are hyper-real !

Are you sure you didn't weave the cloth & put individual spuds in ?

Nar...

...you just Photoshopped real ones in, right ?

(wink)

Broadoak
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Hi Si,

Many thanks for your interest.

I can honestly say the potatoes in the sacks are what is called in a water colour painting a happy accident.
I probably couldn't get that effect again if I tried.

Kind regards Peter M

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I was given a Concor switcher to use as power for one of my special shunters down on the farm. I decided to cheat with the wheel arrangement and call it a 2-4-2. I fancied something built in the farm workshop so thought a wooden body would make a believable alternative to metal.
I have made it up as I've gone along and now it is finished I'm quite pleased with its rustic look. The doors actually open using vertical hinges in the door and frame. The holes in the frame at the bottom of the door were done using a hot pin heated in a blow torch. It was not possible to get my pin vise drill close enough to do the job. All a bit of a bodge but it worked.
Here is a selection of pictures of the device in the yard at Two Sisters.













Peter M

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I have been asked on another forum to take a few close ups of the wooden bodied Simplex, these only serve to show up its faults really.
So I used the opportunity to clean the track and wheels of the locos and stock and generally test the layout ready for its next outing in April.
















Peter M

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Faults?

Where?

I don't see any faults--

Herb

Broadoak
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Thanks Herb, you know what I mean whatever you do you often think I wish I had done it differently.

I had a wander round down the farm this morning and took a couple of pictures of the new shunter's crew. There are two of them the driver and his young son.
I can't run the loco with the doors fully open as there is not enough clearance with the bride supporting wall. I can run with them slightly open though giving the onlooker a glimpse, it is the sort of thing children like to look at while at shows.





Peter M

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Great photos, love the engines and shorty flat car. Hope to make some of my own for my HO

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Hi Peter.

AWESOME pix !

Just love that new wooden critter of yours !

It has that 'Deliverance' look to it !!!

I can almost hear the banjo sounds coming from the cab !

I wont be getting lost in the woods near Two Sisters !!!

All the best.

Cheers.

Si.

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Thank you Si I'm glad you approve. It will be interesting to see how she is received at my next show in a few weeks in Tring.

Peter M

Last edited on Tue Mar 24th, 2015 03:26 pm by Broadoak

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A few pictures taken at Beacon-Rail 2015 exhibition on 11th April, an enjoyable small show where we were sadly the only narrow gauge exhibit.















While exhibiting at Tring we gained another sister.

Peter M

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Hi Peter.

Great pix. from Tring !

Can you tell me what the corrugated-iron material on your green-shed is ?

I've seen a few options for 1:32/1:35 ...
...your shed-roof looks 'bang on'.

Cheers.

Si.

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Hi Simon, The material I used for the corrugated Iron was inside the wrapper of some things used to hold coffee and keep your hands from being burnt. I found them by accident after a shower had de-laminated them. I think craft shops sell brightly coloured stuff you could use instead.

Peter M

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Excellent photos, Peter. I look forward to Two Sister's installments. The detailing is wonderful and the equipment is really fine!
The corrugated material looks just right and I can't believe how much of it I have thrown away over the years! From now on, I am hoarding all cardboard materials, just can't tell what may work from the stuff we toss...

Woodie

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Peter, I continue to enjoy every photograph you post. Your little layout is always an inspiration and a favorite of mine.

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Thank you gentlemen you are too kind.


Regards Peter M

Broadoak
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I have been given a disc of photographs taken by my fellow operator Andy Knott some years ago, here are a few hopefully not seen before.







The Davenport in its original lightly modified condition, it later had a fuel filler and air cleaner added to make it look a bit more interesting.





Peter M

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The Massey Ferguson 35x getting some attention, she is used mainly for light work around the yard.







A view looking down the yard taken from the top of the engine house.





The yard foreman's hut is based on the ones we had at work, which have now been updated.

Peter M

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Love the scenery, your fiddle yard must be bigger than the layout now with all these critters you keep producing. :P

All the best cheers Dan

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Hi Dan,

The fiddle yard is quite small, only two tracks really. At shows I use a table behind the layout to store the rolling stock and power when not in use.
A couple of shots at a show I did last Saturday.





Peter M

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I like that!

What are the bodies? one looks like a 03 and the other US, the centre open cab is great touch.

cheers Dan

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Hi Dan,

The body is made from two American switchers, the one on the left is an SW7 yard switcher the chassis from this powers the device. The one on the right is from a GP7 a road switcher. The fiction being it is powered by a four cylinder diesel in the left side which powers a generator in right hand side. The generator powers the two trucks (bogies) and is also a mobile generator to be used in the fields to power any large electric tools or lights for instance. All nonsense of course, but that is what I like about free lance modelling.

Kind regards Peter M

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A few pictures taken by my fellow operator Andy K on his mobile phone at the Northampton and District Narrow Gauge Open Day. A most enjoyable show I must admit, with a friendly knowledgeable gathering of fellow enthusiasts.











Peter M

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I have been kindly given permission to post a few photographs taken by Mick Thornton, a specialist narrow gauge photographer, at an exhibition last November.
It was a specialist narrow gauge show that I found most enjoyable with a very friendly relaxed atmosphere.













Peter M

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I have kindly been given permission to post some of the superb photographs of Two Sisters Farm taken by Chris Nevard for Model Rail magazine. He came up last year to take the photos which appear in the July issue of Model Rail magazine no 223.

The pictures are in no particular order and will take a while as they all have to be re-sized.













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Great photos of great modeling. Excellent stuff and very inspiring. We can always stand much more!

Woodie

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Very nice!. Congratulations!. Jose.

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Thanks gentlemen, you've made an old man very happy.

Regards Peter M

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Beautiful modeling!

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:moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:

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Peter

So many great little details! Piles of junk--I love piles of junk. I have huge piles of junk of my own--1/1 scale. Makes me feel right at home.

Carry on!


Herb

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I don't know about the states but over here farmers never throw anything away. They just let it pile up, which is good from a modelling point of view.









Peter M

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That is it I'm afraid. Can I thank again Chris Nevard for taking the photos and Model Rail for letting me share them.

Peter M

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Thats some nice modeling right there :)

Broadoak
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This will be my last post on this thread.


After a great deal of thought I have decided to give up my internet connection.
I live in a tiny village and the use of aluminum wire in the telephone system causes all sorts of problems. Of late as the cost has gone up the service I receive has got worse, being very slow and often unusable.
As my only income now is my pension I think the money saved could be put to better use elsewhere.
I have enjoyed posting pictures and accounts of my layouts and will keep the PC for keeping and downloading my photographs.
Thank you all for the interest you have shown in my efforts over the years.


Regards Peter M


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Hate to see you go - I have enjoyed your work. Our son and his family lived in Seven Oaks for almost 5 years and we loved to tour the less developed parts of the countryside. Nothing like a self sustaining estate to give you modeling ideas.

Bill Uffelman

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Hi Peter,
I too will be sad to see you go, but I can understand the reasoning behind your decision.

"Two Sister's Farm" always had a special kind of magic about it for me. Your eye for detail is one of the best I've seen, as shown in photos of "Two Sister' Farm" that have been published here and elsewhere on the web.

Thank you from the other side of the world for the inspiration and the enjoyment I have drawn form your modelling work with "Two Sister's Farm".

Perhaps not "Goodbye', but hopefully "'til we meet again" if you can can find a cost-effective Plan B,

Broadoak
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I have got rid of the BT special deal, about £40 pounds plus per month for 12gb per month, this includes the line charge and then it was only working 50% of the time.

Now I am with Vodaphone which is high speed unlimited, with no line charge and comes with a discount at £20 per month. (my wife has a Vodaphone phone)

Seriously though, it is very good to be back.

Peter M

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:glad::glad::rah::rah::rah: He's baaaaccck!!!
Hi Peter,I'm glad that you've found a plan B that works for you 
The next question is: What have you been up to while you've been "missing"?? 

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The answer to that John is not a lot really if the truth be told. I've been fiddling about with an idea for a small steam locomotive, probably an 0-4-4 as I have a small 0-4-0 chassis that runs well. It is the superstructure I am undecided about, it's still at the pencil sketch stage.
Thanks for the welcome back.

Kind regards Peter M

Broadoak
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Joined: Fri Oct 1st, 2010
Location: Northampton, United Kingdom
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It seems the site that I uploaded my photographs on postimage.org is currently not working, so all my images have gone. I have had my suspicions for some time and recently started using Flickr instead.
This is the third time this has happened to me and if Flickr folds up I will not be posting any more photographs.
I am not the only one affected apparently some 140 million images are affected.
As there has been little interest in my postings of late this will be the last.


Peter M

Si.
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Joined: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012
Location: London
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Hi Peter :wave:



I've got NO IDEA what you mean about ... "As there has been little interest in my postings of late"

The number of views next to your Threads is MASSIVE ! ...

... and is increasing by THOUSANDS every week !!



You & others as well, may not get 20 tedious 'ataboys' every time you twitch ...

... but the numbers say EVERYTHING.



Of course we want MORE of 'Two Sisters Farm' ... MUCH MORE !



As for all the problems of late with EXTERNAL PHOTO HOSTS ...

... this is the exact reason that Freerails HAS ITS OWN PHOTOHOSTING !

More folk should take just a very few minutes, to understand it & use it.



Anyone who wants to have easy & reliable photohosting on Freerails, should go to the 'Photo Posting' Forum ...

... and follow the current recommendations in the 'WINDOWS 10' titled Thread there.


'WINDOWS-10' USERS and THE FREERAILS MEMBERS GALLERY


This method SHOULD work fine for MAC users & any other PC operating systems as well.



Try it and see ... it really is VERY EASY once you've put in a bit of effort to understand it.

Certainly no more difficult that 'PhotoBucket', 'Flickr' & all the other useless photohosts.



All the best.



:moose: :moose: :moose: :moose: :moose:



Si.



BTW Peter ... ATABOY !! ... I just LOVE IT down on the farm !  :bg:



Last edited on Mon Apr 16th, 2018 06:09 pm by Si.

southpier
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Broadoak wrote: It seems the site that I uploaded my photographs on postimage.org is currently not working, so all my images have gone. I have had my suspicions for some time and recently started using Flickr instead.
This is the third time this has happened to me and if Flickr folds up I will not be posting any more photographs.
I am not the only one affected apparently some 140 million images are affected.
As there has been little interest in my postings of late this will be the last.


Peter M
 I don't think it's fair to make your frustration with photo hosting sites the responsibility of folks following your thread, and this is what it feels like to me. there has been nothing but positive response and accolades for your work and continued participation in the forum.
not sure if there has been anything "new" posted since my last read-through, but i'll wager if you do, no one will complain.


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