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Logging layout without a mill ???
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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 01:10 am
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jsprister
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Although I have a reasonable amount of space for my layout in my basement, I am amazed by the realstate it takes to construct a realistic sawmill. Has anyone built an operational layout that transports logs from the forest to the log pond but avoided the modeling of a sawmill? I realize a recording of a sawmill operating in the distance, but not visable on the layout, is a consideration; but I would like to know if anybody has successfully accomplish that without compromising the enjoyment of a logging operations? 



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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 01:32 am
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Herb Kephart
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How about having the log pond towards the rear of the layout and the sawmill can just be a building without any real front to back thickness-- or even if you are artistic, or know someone who is- the mill could be painted on the backdrop---


Herb:old dude:



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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 02:20 am
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Paladin
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Firstly welcome.

You could have a standard gauge static display as a interchange from the On30  And ship the logs  to a mill off scene. Just a short length of track with a crane to offload to a couple of flat cars.

Don



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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 04:12 am
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hminky
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Here is how I am doing it on my 55n3 layout:

The loaded cars come through the hole in the backdrop from the woods, empties are pushed through



On the other side of the backdrop loaded cars are pushed through and empties are pulled out



The mill is only done as the backside with the lumber piles

Here is how it was done for quarry to crusher on the old on30 layout:

http://www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/4x8/operation/lilo/

Thank you if you visit
Harold

Last edited on Wed Feb 17th, 2010 12:21 pm by hminky

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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 12:38 pm
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Dave D
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I have seen a lot of logging layouts, where the builders modeled the Mill as a back drop building modeling only the front of the mill.

Just like Harold is working with only without the loads in empties out portion. ( I like that idea Harold )

They modeled the log pond, and the slip would rise into the backdrop mill.

I will see if I can find a photo and post one if and when I do.

There was also a little logging operation in the American Northwest. Washington state I think.

The Isthmus Lumber Co I believe it was called.

It was owned by a gent who bought out a failed mining operation and used the mining engines to build a few home made locos.

( I have collected the parts and will build one of those locos one day. )

These he used to haul logs out of the woods which were sold to a larger operation.

The logs were dumped into a river where they were floated down to that company's mill site.

So if you wanted, you could just build a log dump and tell folks that story...they get floated down to the mill which is located off layout.

I like the mill as a back drop idea best though.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 17th, 2010 12:48 pm
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Dave D
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This is the backdrop idea I was thinking about.



In fact, I believe I got this photo from Harold's old site, from one of the layouts he visited and photographed when the NNGC was in Santa Claira?

It may be Jim Vails HOn3 layout?

It could be done in O scale, with a minimum amount of pain, the supporting structures could be left out as well.

Dirty up the windows so you can't see in, and place your speaker in there and run the sounds.

It's your railroad...your choice, but I think something like this is the best compromise if you don't want to build an entire mill.

You want something there..otherwise we can just do an oval of track on a bit of plywood and as the train goes around we can say...this is the town "off layout" and this is the industry "off layout" and this is where it goes by mount Rushmore..."off layout". :bg: ;)

Hope that helps!



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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2010 03:21 am
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Garyshay
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WELCOME..from one newb to another,

I can't get enough of this site. I've discovered a wealth of information on this sight & the members are all willing to share great advice and ideas, without negativity.

For your trackplan, another concept that would work, would be to have the mill on the aisle side. In other words, as a viewer in the aisle you would be looking through the windows from the inside of the wall of the mill, toward the log pond. This 'false front' could be just the wall itself or you could even model some of the internal structure but all cut-away. Kinda inverse of Dave's suggestion, where the mill, 'false front', is on the backdrop.

This technique is used on the GATSME club model railroad, in Fort Washington, PA, USA,, albiet the viewer is looking out to a street through the windows of a series of row houses. The row houses are only a cast plaster false front, 1/4" thich. the aisle side is painted flatblack and the faces are fully detailed. It brings the viewer into the scene.

I also remember way back in the grey cells that there was a track plan of a logging railroad that used this false front sawmill technique with a logging road. Might have been '101 trackplans' or possibly another trackplan book.

Best of luck!

Gary 

 

 

 



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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2010 04:32 am
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Dave D
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Garyshay wrote: I also remember way back in the grey cells that there was a track plan of a logging railroad that used this false front sawmill technique with a logging road. Might have been '101 trackplans' or possibly another trackplan book.

Best of luck!

Gary

That's a great idea as well Gary.

I think I remember that plan.

The mill was sliced on an angle so you had a cut away view of the insides, cool idea.

My only thought on that would be to build a plexi panel or some kind of buffer to protect it from wayward body parts and/or clothing snagging it as you passed by as it was built right up against the layout edge.



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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2010 01:15 pm
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Dave D
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BTW,

If we are speaking of the same plan, it was in Model Railroaders booklet "48 Top Notch Track Plans".



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 Posted: Fri Feb 19th, 2010 09:40 pm
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lenelg
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Not all logging railroads ended up at a sawmill! Early logging in the Northwest started in coastal areas by cutting trees near the water and floating logs to a sawmill, which could be miles away. As the easily accessible trees were harvested, logging railroads were built from the logdump to increase the reach, but logs were still dumped into the water and floated to the mill. In some cases, elaborate techniques were developed to tie logs together into huge rafts which could withstand being towed in open seas.

Last edited on Fri Feb 19th, 2010 09:40 pm by lenelg

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