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Dolly Varden Mines Railway
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 Posted: Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 11:51 am
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Paladin
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Thanks Dan

Great just looking at the pictures, almost as good as seeing the real thing.

One point, John's sections were modeled using basswood and Dan's sections mainly from balsa.

Dan tells me The Dolly Varden is booked up to tour many model  train shows,

It is layouts such as this that give people such as I the desire to improve our skills.

Again many thanks to John and Dan

Don

Last edited on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 11:52 am by Paladin



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 Posted: Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 12:27 pm
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madmike3434
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danpickard wrote:
  Sorry, there never really was a track plan as such, it just happened so to speak.

Dan Pickard


I think that is the best way to build a layout.  Have a general idea of what you want, then start at either end or the middle and have at it .

In the case of multiple modules like this one , a basic plan would work. ?

I have seen where people spend so much time, planning, planning, planning some more , then correcting, then more planning and then either never building anything because they are planned out trying to make the perfect plan . Then finding out that everything they wanted on the layout/module will not fit in the given space once its under construction.  If you think you will be short of space, YOU WILL .

my 3 cents canadian.....$ was up yesterday

mike

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 Posted: Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 12:56 pm
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Lucas Gargoloff
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Wooooooooooowwwwwwww!!!!!!

We have a guy here with big eyes to details!!! lol. I like the trees, bridges, water... everything!!! And most important, terrain is superb!

Thanks for sharing! :moose::moose::moose::moose::moose:



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 Posted: Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 01:48 pm
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Dave D
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Fantastic work and photos Dan.

I have seen various other shots, but these take the cake.

As Don mentioned, these are the types of scenery applications I too shall reference when that time comes for me.

Please tell, How did you like working with frocks?

Fantastic scenery planning as well, your separate sections blend seamlessly, had you not mentioned where the two came together, I would not have been able to guess.

Simply stunning........




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 Posted: Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 02:57 pm
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Herb Kephart
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Dan-

One of those times when words seem feeble in comparison to what you are trying to describe.

The ability to transport the layout to the viewers makes congratulations on the success of your efforts even more inadequate.

There are a number of overworked words that could be used.


Awesome, stunning, breath taking, inspiring---and many more


But I think you get the idea


Herb Kephart:old dude:



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 Posted: Sat Apr 25th, 2009 03:36 am
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Paladin
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I asked Dan what track they used

Wait for it

Peco- HO with every second tie removed

I think you will all agree it looks fantastic.

Don



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 Posted: Sat Apr 25th, 2009 03:54 am
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danpickard
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Don,

almost right...

The main track is Peco On30 flex stuff.  The "HO" stuff was just used for the trestle where it was "hand layed".  I built the trestle top first (stingers and ties), then removed around half the ties from a length of HO flex.  The track was then bent to the curve on the trestle top, and held in gauge by the plastic ties (they slotted in between the timber ties on the trestle).  Track was spiked across the bridge span, and then the plastic ties removed... handlayed track with minimal keeping in gauge issues.  Seen it done before on a whole layout, with all the ties put down, and cheap flex track with half the plastic ties removed used on top, hand spiked, then remove the rest of the ties.  Works well with narrow gauge stuff because the really backwoodsy lines often had plenty of space between the ties to work with.  Very successful method for the novice hand layer.

Generally, we aren't fans of hand layed track, especially with exhibition layouts.  Seems to be more issues with movement and gauging problems.  There was an interesting clinic on hand laying track.

"The novice builder starts using flex track, then as they get more experience, they use hand layed track, then as they get more experience, they use flex track." :)

Dan

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 Posted: Sat Apr 25th, 2009 04:46 am
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Paladin
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That's the story of my life.

ALMOST RIGHT.

The method you describe for laying the track on the trestle sounds easy, even for someone like myself.



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 Posted: Sat Apr 25th, 2009 09:16 am
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albula_de
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Dan,

this is an absolutly fantastic layout, one of the best I have seen the last years:thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb:

I also have a question:
how do you create the rocks on the layout?

At this point I work on my Romania logging layout, tunnel build in rock.

cheers
Kalle



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 Posted: Sat Apr 25th, 2009 11:02 am
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danpickard
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Kalle,

There is a mixture of real rock, plaster castings and soft rocks.  The large rock faces are soft rocks, like in the high rock cutting with the little Davenport sitting with the ore cars.

Use an old piece of foam, like an old seat cushion, or see a foam dealer for off cuts.  Basically any shape can become a soft rock, but in this case, that one rock face (nearly 3' long) was one piece of foam, cut to about 2" thick.

Start slashing the foam with a blade, saw etc, anything sharp really.  Look at pics of real rock faces for reference, in this case, the cutting would have been probably drilled and blasted, hence some of the angular looking cuts.  One the slashing is done, start picking at the foam with your fingers, pull out sections creating some depth to the face (thats why I start at 2" thick).  Some of the pieces I pulled out were then wedged back into cracks to for overhangs, glued in with gap filler.  Keep working the foam shape until happy with its profile.

Now the messy part.  I wet the foam first to help with the spreading, and use aliberal amount of an acrylic gap filler (ie no-more-gaps, any tube gap sealer really, I use the cheapest I can find @ about $2 a tube, since there is about 30 tubes used in the whole layout!).  Squeeze the gap filler all over the foam rock, put on some gloves, get some more water on the gap filler paste and massage it over and into the foam.  Massaging it in well removes the sponge look of the foam.  When well covered, might have to be left for about a week to dry properly, especially if the foam is really wet.

When dry, I started with a quick spray of a "rock colour", beige in this case.  I used a few different colour tile grouts, sprinkle on liberally while the "rock" is flat, and then grab an old paint brush.  Mist on some water, and the grout almost starts to turn into a texture paint, work it around the rock face with the old brush until happy.  A thin black wash can be put over when the grout is dry if desired.  I then finished with heavy dry brushing using a pallette of raw sienna, beige and pale grey.  Dullcote if required.

Given the soft rock is flexible, it can be easily shaped over the scenery shell, and held in place with liquid nails.  Also very forgiving as a transportable piece, less chance of cracking like with plaster, lighter than rock.  The plaster rocks on the layout were generally confined to sections that needed to be thin, like at the waterfall.

Hope this helps...

Dan Pickard

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