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HOn3 Hand laying track
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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2008 12:51 am
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Carson
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So i've learned that with HOn3 track there aren't very many dealers, and unlike HOn30 you can't use N scale track with it..  I am very constructive and I love scratch building things.  I have steady hands and i'm sure with my fathers help I could build pretty much anything I need for a nice looking layout.  So the question is... HOW exactly do you hand lay track?  What do you use for ties?  Would you have to strip HO flex track to get the material?  How would you re- .. errr ... get the track back on the ties:)

Links to how-to websites would be greatly appreciated!


EDIT: bleh probably wrong section, but yeah:doh:


- Carson

Last edited on Thu Jul 24th, 2008 12:52 am by Carson

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2008 01:51 am
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ytter_man
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I've never done it myself, because it takes a lot of patience and skill to do it right.

Ties are glued on a pre determined route on your layout with even spacing. Then you lay one rail spiking it into the tie every 4 or so ties with little tiny spikes, using a special tool or a needlenose pliers. For your next rail you'll need track spacers to keep things in correct gauge, and there's a certain way to use these on curves.

Turnouts... i dont even wanna go there...

TBH if you're getting into narrow gauge it'd be easier to buy things ready made.

Also, dont be afraid to build your first layout in standard gauge using redily availble flextrack and premade turnouts, it's what i'm doing and i have a logging layout going for me.

Bachmann's Shay and Climax and Rivarossi's Heisler dont come in HOn3 versions that i know of, and they're the easiest for someone who wants to model logging or mining to acquire, unless you're made of money and want brass.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2008 01:56 am
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Paladin
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Carson,

A few small points before you jump in the deep end:-

What size is the layout to be, a switching layout or mainline

Power to be what  DC or DCC

What era would you like

Permanent or pack away when not in use

As a rule of thumb Narrow gauge is more expensive than standard gauge.

Hand laying track is a good idea, does this mean you intend to build your own switches. There are commercial jigs available but they are not cheap unless you intend to build quite a few.

I suggest you give attention to the costs involved in what ever you choose to do, nothing worse than doing all the planning and getting a layout half built and then not  be able to keep moving forward due to the lack of funds.

Logging can be done with Standard Gauge (Most economical) Or Narrow Gauge in On30 ( Cheapest Narrow Gauge ) Unfortunately the smaller Narrow Gauge scales start to cost more, and you do not have a wide selection of stuff available.

What ever you decide we will help where ever we can. Remember its your railroad.

Have fun

Don




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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2008 01:58 am
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Carson
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For now I would just like to know so maybe I can get out some old flex track and try it for once.  I have a Rivarossi 3 truck heisler for HO scale and I used to have a 2 truck shay that I got off walthers.com, dunno the manufacteror, but I totally scrapped that. 

It's really just curiosity kicking in, something new to try:thumb:

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2008 01:58 am
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acousticco
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Hi Carson,
Check out the below links for some excellent handlaying track tips:
http://www.railwayeng.com/handlay6/hndly-h3.htm
http://www.railwayeng.com/rrhints.htm

That's essentially where I learned everything I know about handlaying. I've recently been using a jig from Fasttracks to build turnouts with, that I'm more or less happy with. They have lots of videos that might be useful: http://www.handlaidtrack.com/

Good Luck!

-Cody

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 Posted: Thu Jul 24th, 2008 02:38 am
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Dwayne
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Hey Carson, Woodie recently encouraged me to try handlaying the track on my 15" x 20" micro layout. I'm glad I did it as I found it to be an enjoyable aspect of the modeling experience.

It's not that difficult once you get started. Keep an eye on maintaining the track gauge and it should go just fine. :)



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 Posted: Tue Aug 5th, 2008 03:03 pm
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mopman
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There are dual gauge track guages available for spiking 3' or standard gauge track.  It only take 8 pieces of rail to lay a turnout - two for the outside stock rails, two soldered together to form the frog, two for the points and two short pieces for the guard rails.  If I'm at the top of my game, I can lay a turnout and install a ground throw in about 30 to 45 minutes (given the ties are already glued in place).  Now if you want to lay a dual gauge turnout, add another 20 - 30 minutes.  Handlaying track gives you many more options than using commercial turnouts plus you get to take credit for the incredible trackwork. :thumb:

PS: I glue my ties on cork roadbed but I use Kapler ties.  They are the best and hold spikes well.  I haven't had any problems with any of my current trackwork that was laid four year ago.

 

Last edited on Tue Aug 5th, 2008 03:09 pm by mopman



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 Posted: Tue Aug 5th, 2008 04:18 pm
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W C Greene
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Carson-Mopman is the horse's mouth. Whatever he says about handlaying track is the right thing. Guess what? Mopman admires Herb's track, it's kinda like DiVinci admiring Michaelangelo...Hmmmmm.  Don't listen to me unless you want to lay track that looks like Picasso drew it!

        Woodie



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 Posted: Tue Aug 5th, 2008 04:41 pm
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mopman
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Well in all fairness Woodie, you lay your track to look the way it does (narrow gauge funky).  And as long as everything stays on the tracks who cares.  Now that I think about it, you got me started with handlayed track some 30 years ago.  Damn, are we that old????



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