View single post by Keith Pashina
 Posted: Sat May 13th, 2017 07:48 am
PMQuoteReplyFull Topic
Keith Pashina

 

Joined: Sun Nov 4th, 2012
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
Posts: 766
Status: 
Offline
NEVADAVILLE
Wow!  Those are some great photos posted by James. Thank you for sharing these.
One thing that struck me was how Nevadaville's main street has not really changed all that much in the past 55 years.

Compare this picture taken in 2015 to the one James posted on May 10, taken in  1962. The trees have grown up next to the buildings and on Quartz Hill (at right side of photo), but all the buildings are still there and look about the same.  Amazing the town buildings have been stabilized as well as they have.
But, the mine building photos James posted show a lot of interesting structures that are long gone. James' photos show a lot of mine buildings on the north slope of Quartz Hill. Fortunately, the Pozo Mine shaft is still there, and it was partially restored several years ago. But, a lot of the other buildings just "disappeared."



Compare James' photos of Quartz Hill to this image, taken in 2015. The brick smokestacks help identify the location to the photos James posted on May 11.
SNOWPLOW
Si, that's a nice snowplow you're building in 1:35n2. The photo you included with your May 7th post, of the snowplow at the Eureka Gulch water tank, is about it. There are a few more, but they do not definitely show much more detail



This photo shows 2 shays at the snowplow at the Gold Collar Mine spur on the east side of Prosser Gulch. This doesn't show much detail at all, but notice how small this plow was compared to the engiineman standing next to the shay!
So, if you are building a model, I'd say use your imagination as to what looks correct - there will not be any photos to contradict what you build!
MEADE MILL WAGON RUTS
Helmut, I agree that there are very pronounced ruts in that road. However, I think they are just the result of many wagons pounding down a narrow road, where there is little room to maneuver to either side. For example, check out the photo below, showing several ore wagons lined up on a narrow dirt road. I think they would make ruts rather quickly after several passes.  But, that brings up another detail to model for this area - wagon wheel ruts in the road!



Keith






Close Window