View single post by Keith Pashina
 Posted: Fri Apr 26th, 2013 06:00 am
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Keith Pashina

 

Joined: Sun Nov 4th, 2012
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
Posts: 777
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The Sn3 Symposium began registration last night (Wednesday) and resumed this morning. 



Today (Thurssday), in the afternoon, two layouts hosted operating sessions.  The first was Jeff Otto's huge, and I mean huge, HO Missabe Northern layout.  This has been published in magazines recently.  There were 26 people signed up to operate, and I will post photos from this session in a future post (I didn't attend, but a friend did).

The second operating session was Ed Petry's HO Sierra Railroad, which also features HOn3 Westside Lumber Company.  I will also make a future post of Ed's layout.




In the evening, clinics were held.  The first clinic was by Pete Nelson, and Pete showed a video originally shot by Helen Tatum of the Colorado & Southern narrow gauge's last passenger train from Denver to Leadville.  This was shot in the 1930s, and featured a lot of scenes I had never seen before.  I was particularly fascinated by the footage of ice harvesting operations in Platte River Canyon - the narrator said up to 80 cars of ice were shipped to Denver daily!



The second clinic was by John Niemeyer, and was on how to use LED lighting in models.  John specializes in using the extremely small LEDs to light his rolling stock, locomotives, structures, and figures.



Johns uses the micro-sized LEDs - one is shown here in an HO Grandt line lampshade.

John gave several examples of applications, and described his techniques on how he installed the LEDs in his models.



Above is an example of scale-sized marker lights in an HOn3 caboose.

Next up with Pete Smith's clinic on scratchbuilding models in styrene.  Originally, a clinic on DCC was to have been offered, but the presenter was ill and had to cancel. 




Pete graciously volunteered at the last minute to give a clinic.



Here is one of several of Pete's S scale models he described.  Many of his structures are built entirely of styrene, as shown here.



Above is one of Pete's completed models he described in his clinic.

I will post more tomorrow.

Keith

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